Amazon Kindle Begins the Removal of Hundreds of Books

Scott Douglas:My guess is there’s going to be some bigger announcement by Amazon regarding public domain by the end of the year. Which begs the question: what happens if I want to re-download a book that was removed because of this new policy? And further isn't this make a little bit too much of a monopoly for the company? Publishers big and small have successfully republished public domain works with new covers and different authors providing introductions for the past hundred years. A larger percentage of the publishing industry is made up of this kind of practice. For Amazon to say that they will only let one publisher sell something like Huck Finn seems a little odd, and frankly illegal to me.

Comments

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

I am noticing one of our

I am noticing one of our books (albeit an old edition of the book) can be downloaded as a Kindle Edition. We never gave any one the right to use any of our books, regardless of how old the edition, so how is it possible that we are seeing that it is available to purchase. How does one track the sales of Kindle books?

I am noticing one of our

I am noticing one of our books (albeit an old edition of the book) can be downloaded as a Kindle Edition. We never gave any one the right to use any of our books, regardless of how old the edition, so how is it possible that we are seeing that it is available to purchase. How does one track the sales of Kindle books?

use of material for Kindle Store

I am noticing one of our books (albeit an old edition of the book) can be downloaded as a Kindle Edition. We never gave any one the right to use any of our books, regardless of how old the edition, so how is it possible that we are seeing that it is available to purchase. How does one track the sales of Kindle books?

CAROL

Let's not get carried away

The Project Gutenberg books are directly downloadable to the Kindle and have been for some tme. That's 30,000 books. The steps for doing this are on my site and others'.

Those who Kindle can get books direct to the Kindle from feedbooks.com, manybooks.net ( use mnybks.net to actually download the books to Kindle) and even fictionwise.com now owned by Barnes & Noble.

Amazon will not, after '1984gate' be deleting any books you've purchased which were uploaded to Amazon... mainly because they'd lose their entire Kindle crowd if they did that again and they know it.
And they certainly won't be deleting material you got elsewhere.

On the Amazon forums there is a popular and humongous thread of about 1200+ posts from which many learn about how to get books from everywhere else, and how to quickly convert them, as needed, for the Kindle.

And I've written a piece on how to quickly convert any of the million free Google books so you can read them on the Kindle.

As for the public domain books, we can get them from just about anywhere. What customers have complained about is the never-ending proliferation of public domain books on Amazon, some of which have no table of contents, are badly formatted, have all kinds of errors, because Amazon had let everything up in the digital-publishing upload area, within a day.

They are now, from what I read on Amazon forums, doing 5-day reviews of uploaded material. Harry Potter books were uploaded almost daily - but the author refuses to make them available for the Kindle and those are then obviously illegal uploads. Amazon customers reported lots of occurrences of such things.

If Amazon will have only one version of a public domain maybe they'll choose only those with working Table of Contents hyperlinks and correctly formatted etc. My guess is they'd have two or or most three Amazon chosen ones for the free-option. If it were only one and the best in their minds, for free, then that's their prerogative and we have less work to do when trying to get a book. I had to download and check out samples for about 12 versions of the Devil's Dictionary and most were missing essential things like working Table of Contents.

As it turns out, the best one I found came from an individual posting at Mobileread forums and was free. So that's what I'm using.

Remember we can read MOBI or PRC files on the Kindle and rights-unprotected documents will be converted by Amazon (for free if you send it to [you]@free.kindle.com] and then move the converted copy to the Kindle yourself. Many of us just run it through a free converter ourselves.

- Andrys
kindleworld.blogspot.com

I don't know the T&C's you take on with a Kindle

As we don't have them in the UK! but I suppose that could set out a lot of things.
It might stop you downloading any material that is not authorised or from Amazon, which would be unlikely from everything I've read, but if it was in the T&C's it would be enforceable.
Amazon itself could certainly say it's only selling Huck Finn from one company, they are a business that can decide what they do or don't want to sell. Whether or not they could stop you having in on their kindle depends on what you've agreed to.
I can't imagine that use of copyright free (Guttenberg etc) resources are not allowed, but I'd bet that Amazon would say, if it doesn't come from us how do we know that it's not just the text of something you've bittorrented and it's not actually public domain? I can see a lack of responsibility clause being hidden away somewhere that could explain some actions.

Syndicate content