Bibliofuture's blog

Mourning A Mentor: Students Pay Tribute To Marable

Columbia University professor Manning Marable did not live to see the publication of his life's work, a new biography called Malcolm X: A Life of Reinvention. The book was released Monday, just days after Marable, 60, died Friday of complications from pneumonia.

Marable was the author of 15 books and a multitude of scholarly articles. He founded Colgate University's Africana and Latin American Studies program as well as the Institute for Research in African-American Studies at Columbia, where he was a mentor to countless students. Three of them gathered in the late scholar's office over the weekend to discuss why Marable was such an important influence on them — and on African-American research in the U.S.

Full piece on NPR

Netflix Nabs Rights to Stream 'Mad Men'

Netflix has inked a deal with Lionsgate TV for streaming rights to Mad Men reruns.

The video service paid nearly $1 million per episode for all seven seasons of the AMC drama, which will begin airing July 27.

Full story

Amazon underbidder on frontlist auction

Amazon underbidder on frontlist auction

Amazon has emerged as the surprise underbidder on a multi-million dollar auction for a self-published author, the first time the retailer is believed to have bid on frontlist.

Full article here.

Publishing consultant Mike Shatzkin comments on the article.

E-Reserves Lawsuit / Kindlefish

Judge Sets Trial Date in Georgia State University E-Reserves Lawsuit
http://bit.ly/hnKdZM

Kindlefish Turns Kindle Into Worldwide Translator
http://bit.ly/dHbOfG

Should physical & e-book sales be protected from the elusive danger of library e-book checkouts?

Radio story

When a library buys a book, it buys it once. This was the case for e-books as well. Now, HarperCollins is making its e-books expire for libraries after 26 checkouts. In other words, it’s treating an e-book like an e-subscription to a magazine, such that the library never actually owns the book outright. And libraries are outraged; some are even boycotting all HarperCollins books, which include those by Anne Rice, Sarah Palin, and Michael Crichton. Libraries claim that, as demand for e-books skyrockets, they cannot afford to re-buy e-books. HarperCollins, which is owned by Rupert Murdoch, claims that this move is necessary to protect e-book retail sales, physical book sales, and brick-and-mortar bookstores. Do you think that all publishers should take this move to protect book sales? Or do you side with libraries, which are already pinched for money as state budgets are slashed across the country? Would you like to see the price of e-books be kept from going too low or do you see e-books as a natural progression that should not be tampered with?

Download MP3 here

Webpage of story here.

Creating a digital public library without Google's money

Like other authors and researchers, I'm conflicted about the project. On the plus side, the vision of a widely accessible digital library is a worthy one that is, for the first time in human history, technologically achievable.

On the other hand, Google was plotting to acquire effective control over millions of works whose copyrights belong to others.

Full article in the LA Times

Noted Self-Publisher May Be Close to a Book Deal

Amanda Hocking, the darling of the self-publishing world, has been shopping a four-book series to major publishers, attracting bids of well over $1 million for world English rights, two publishing executives said.

Full post at NYT.com

"The Rise and Fall of the Bible": Rethinking the Good Book

Recently I found myself explaining to a group of surprised friends from Protestant and secular backgrounds that, despite being educated in the Catholic faith up to the sacrament of confirmation at age 14, I didn't read the Old Testament until I was assigned it in a college literature course. Traditionally, the Catholic Church did not encourage its congregation to read the Bible; we had the priests to explain it to us. In fact, the church once took such a dim view of the idea that, in 1536, the English reformer William Tyndale was tried for heresy, strangled and burned at the stake, largely for translating the Bible into English for a lay readership. Tyndale House, a major American Christian publisher, is named after him. -- Read More

Eisler’s decision is a key benchmark on the road to wherever it is we’re going

I wasn’t planning to write a post this past weekend for Monday morning publication. But then Joe Konrath and Barry Eisler contacted me on Saturday to tell me what Barry is up to. I’ve read their lengthy conversation about Barry’s decision to turn down a $500,000 contract (apparently for two books) and join Joe (and many others, but none who have turned down half-a-million bucks) as a self-published author.

To use a metaphor that connects with the current news: this is a very major earthquake. This one won’t cause a tsunami and a nuclear meltdown, but you better believe it will lead everybody living near a reactor — everybody working in a major publishing house — to do a whole new round of risk-assessment. Because, in its way, this is more threatening than the earthquake that just hit Japan. This self-publishing author will much more assuredly and directly spawn followers.

As news of Eisler’s decision spreads, phones will be ringing in literary agencies all over town with authors asking agents, “shouldn’t I be doing this?”

Full blog post

Renee Zellweger Grabs Some Inspirational Reading in NYC

Newly single Renée Zellweger spent some time shopping at a local book store on the Upper East Side where she bought an interesting choice: The Social Animal: The Hidden Sources of Love, Character, and Achievement by David Brooks. Looks like her break from Bradley Cooper has her searching for some guidance!

http://www.okmagazine.com/2011/03/renee-zellweger-grabs-some-inspiration...

Colorado Publishers and Libraries Collaborate on Ebook Lending Model

Libraries would own ebooks and offer purchase through catalog.
http://www.libraryjournal.com/lj/home/889765-264/colorado_publishers_and_libraries_collabora...

James Gleick’s History of Information

Review in the NYT Sunday Review of Books

Book on Amazon: The Information: A History, a Theory, a Flood

Book trailer

If You Knew Then What I Know Now from Sarabande Books on Vimeo.

This book trailer got a good write up at Publisher's Weekly.

Richard Curtis 1999

Richard Curtis, veteran literary agent and president of Ereads.com, shared a few publishing predictions for 2011.

Here is a talk by Curtis in 1999 called Content Spoken Here

Intellectual Property’s Great Fallacy

Abstract:
Intellectual property law has long been justified on the belief that external incentives are necessary to get people to produce artistic works and technological innovations that are easily copied. This Essay argues that this foundational premise of the economic theory of intellectual property is wrong. Using recent advances in behavioral economics, psychology, and business-management studies, it is now possible to show that there are natural and intrinsic motivations that will cause technology and the arts to flourish even in the absence of externally supplied rewards, such as copyrights and patents.

Download full PDF here

Data Seen Overwhelming Cell Networks

As the popularity of smartphones continues to grow, the challenge, on a global scale, may only get greater.

Full article

Google Digitizes Back Issues of 'Spy' Magazine

The defunct satirical publication that launched a thousand magazine careers and dodged a thousand lawsuits is now available digitally — thanks to Google.

One minute piece on NPR

Searchable archive of Spy Magazine on Google

Trespass: A History Of Uncommissioned Urban Art

Trespass: A History Of Uncommissioned Urban Art

Graffiti and unsanctioned art—from local origins to global phenomenon

In recent years street art has grown bolder, more ornate, more sophisticated and—in many cases—more acceptable. Yet unsanctioned public art remains the problem child of cultural expression, the last outlaw of visual disciplines. It has also become a global phenomenon of the 21st century.
Made in collaboration with featured artists, Trespass examines the rise and global reach of graffiti and urban art, tracing key figures, events and movements of self-expression in the city's social space, and the history of urban reclamation, protest, and illicit performance. The first book to present the full historical sweep, global reach and technical developments of the street art movement, Trespass features key works by 150 artists, and connects four generations of visionary outlaws including Jean Tinguely, Spencer Tunick, Keith Haring, Os Gemeos, Jenny Holzer, Barry McGee, Gordon Matta-Clark, Shepard Fairey, Blu, Billboard Liberation Front, Guerrilla Girls and Banksy, among others. It also includes dozens of previously unpublished photographs of long-lost works and legendary, ephemeral urban artworks.

The Wristwatch Looks For a New Use

As people stop telling the time using their wristwatches and use their mobile phones instead, a new genre of device takes up the vacant real estate on their wrists.

Article mentions the wrist watch being used as a "third screen" to present information.

Full article

$467 Book

$467 book that made it into the Amazon top 100 books.

Modernist Cuisine: The Art and Science of Cooking

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