kmccook's blog

To Be Translated or Not to Be

International PEN and the Institut Ramon Llull of Barcelona present To Be Translated or Not to Be, a report on the state of international literary translation. Librarian.

Doris Lessing Wins Nobel Prize for Literature

Doris Lessing wins Nobel Prize.

"that epicist of the female experience, who with scepticism, fire and visionary power has subjected a divided civilisation to scrutiny"

--Librarian.

Naomi Klein to visit CUPE library picketline in Vancouver

Naomi Klein to visit CUPE library picketline tomorrow to express support. Award-winning journalist, syndicated columnist and author of international bestseller No Logo is planning to stop in at the CUPE 391 picketline tomorrow during her world tour of her new book, the Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism to express her support for Vancouver's library workers and their right to "better pay".

Klein will also express her support for the city's civic workers that have been on strike for over 11 weeks now.

Librarians as Revolutionaries

Mark my words, librarians will be on the front lines when the revolution comes.

Vatican Investigates Ignacio Ellacuria prof. Phan

[diacritics alert...can't seem to put them in]..
Irony Abounds.
Rev.Peter C. Phan, Ignacio Ellacuría professor, is being investigated by the Vatican. It seems there is Vatican concern that Phan's Being Religious Interreligiously: Asian Perspectives on Interfaith Dialogue (Orbis, 2004) could conflict with a 2000 Vatican document, Dominus lesus.
See also the book, Paying the Price Ignacio Ellacuría and the Murdered Jesuits of El Salvador, by Teresa Whitfield.
Temple University Press.

Tour de Vancouver Public Library

Tour de VPL..Bike strike brigade hits all 21 branches closed since the strike .
Negotiations to resume next week.

Bush Flunkies Crush Dissent Screaming "USA! USA!"

NYTimes editorial 8/225/2007comments on the Bush administration's crushing of dissent.
Every White House stage-manages presidential events, but this level of obsession with silencing the vox pop is a symptom of this administration's broader problem honoring Americans' constitutional freedoms.

President Bush's encounters with ordinary Americans have been micromanaged and laboriously controlled for the past five years to weed
out the merest whiff of protest.
Citizen volunteers are enlisted to vet cranky-looking sorts outside the event, and "rally squads" of zealots are prompted to pounce on anyone who manages to slip through with an outspoken thought or an unscripted word.

The ACLU notes, "The Presidential Advance Manual is the Bush administration's guide for planning presidential events around the country, and it repeatedly instructs organizers about 'the best method for preventing demonstrators,' "deterring potential protestors from attending events," "designat[ing] a protest area ... preferably not in view of the event site or motorcade route,' and the like.'

View pdf of Presidential Advance Manual

The Washington Post: To counter any demonstrators who do get in, advance teams are told to create "rally squads" of volunteers with large hand-held signs, placards or banners with "favorable messages." Squads should be placed in strategic locations and "at least one squad should be 'roaming' throughout the perimeter of the event to look for potential problems," the manual says.

"These squads should be instructed always to look for demonstrators," it says. "The rally squad's task is to use their signs and banners as shields between the demonstrators and the main press platform. If the demonstrators are yelling, rally squads can begin and lead supportive chants to drown out the protestors (USA!, USA!, USA!). As a last resort, security should remove the demonstrators from the event site."

We believe in lifelong learning, truth, and social justice

Vancouver Public Library Workers Strike continues.

We are compassionate. We are honest. We are ethical. We are smart and creative. We believe in lifelong learning, truth, and social justice....Our actions right now-whether we're explaining to the public about waiving fines, keeping the press informed, or out there talking to our friends-are how we continue to demonstrate these values to our community as this strike continues. And we have every reason to be
proud.

Strike Continues at Vancouver Public Library

See video clip.
Vancouver Librarians Rally [short but inspirational].

Bargaining Updates.

Pay Equity is at Center of Vancouver Library Workers' Strike

Vancouver's three striking unions accused the city late yesterday of refusing to negotiate properly since negotiations resumed a week ago, leading the city to declare that talks had officially broken down because the unions ended the news media blackout.

A news media blackout had been in effect for a week, with no information escaping from either side. However, the union presidents decided to break that ban yesterday to discuss their frustration at how slowly negotiations had been progressing.
Alex Youngberg, the president of CUPE 391, the library workers union, said the library board refused to discuss pay equity, which has been the library workers' biggest concern since the beginning of the strike.

Marjorie Griffin Cohen, a professor of political science and women's studies at Simon Fraser University, said B.C. is one of the few provinces that do not have pay-equity legislation.

"That's why, when unions are negotiating for it, it's absolutely crucial, because that's the only way they're going to get it," Dr. Cohen said.

Vancouver librarians currently earn $7 less per hour than those in Toronto, which falls under Ontario's provincial pay-equity legislation.

Library Video of the Year! Vancouver Read-In

For the first time in 77 years, the workers of the Vancouver Public Library are on strike. On July 29th, 2007, a Read In was held at Library Square. An artful video clip filmed at LIBRARY SQUARE during the read-in is a call to arms to stand with the library workers of Vancouver.

Bad Night at Powell Library (UCLA)

Report on the UCLA Laser Incident:Bad Night at Powell Library

Gentle Sherpas of the Public Library

Read about the Gentle Sherpas of the Public Library in ongoing coverage of the Vancouver Public Library Strike.

Read or Die

A study of 3,260 Medicare patients ages 65 and older in Cleveland, Tampa, Miami and San Antonio, starting in 1997 found that older adults who cannot read and understand basic health information have a 50 per cent higher mortality rate over a five-year period than those with adequate reading skills.
Not being able to read properly impairs people's ability to obtain critical information about their health and can dramatically shorten their lives, concludes a study in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Read or Die.

Vancouver Library Workers Strike!

Vancouver Library Workers Strike!

Read announcement on the blog of President, Alex Youngberg, CUPE 391.

Mini-Penis Censored

Penis Censored in Children's Book. See photo here.

Nobel Pens.

Cleto Munari, designer and silversmith from Vicenza, Italy recently invited four international architects to help him design a new collection--pens dedicated to five Nobel Laureates in Literature. See picture here.

Borges by Adolfo Bioy Casares

One of the most popular quotes about libraries (included on a stamp) is from "The Library of Babel" by Jorge Luis Borges. So, this new book will be of great interest to us all.
"Yo, que me figuraba el Paraiso
Bajo la especie de una biblioteca."
"I, who imagined paradise as a kind of library."
=

Borges by Adolfo Bioy Casares, Ediciones Destino .

So far only in Spanish. Review here by David Gallagher author of Modern Latin American Literature.

Adolfo Bioy Casares had his first conversation with Jorge Luis Borges in 1931 or 1932, when Bioy was about eighteen and Borges was thirty-two. From then on they enjoyed an extraordinarily intense literary friendship which lasted until Borges's death in 1986. In 1947 Bioy started to write a diary, in which he recorded the often daily conversations that make up this gargantuan book.

[for more since LISNews doesn't do diacritics, see Librarian].

Librarian Response to the "War on Terror."

Library Juice reports:

Elaine Harger, outgoing coordinator of the ALA Social Responsibilities Round Table, compiled a list of resolutions by ALA Council on the War on Terror, for distribution to congressional offices on Tuesday, which was a day of lobbying during the ALA Conference in Washington, DC. The list is online at Library Juice in PDF form, and also here:

American Library Association statements re: the "War on Terror"

Since the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, the United States government has implemented policies, practices and legislation that have compromised the democratic ideals of our country. These include activities that violate the constitutional rights of American citizens, promote a war based on a campaign of disinformation, and continue to bring about widespread destruction and loss of life abroad. The American Library Association has passed numerous resolutions addressing these concerns, excerpts of which appear below.

Brought to your attention by the Social Responsibilities Round Table of ALA-Washington DC, June 26, 2007.

2003- ON CIVIL LIBERTIES & USA PATRIOT Act

Resolution on the USA PATRIOT Act and Related Measures that Infringe on the Rights of Library Users

"RESOLVED, that the American Library Association considers sections of the USA PATRIOT Act are a present danger to the constitutional rights and privacy rights of library users..."
Adopted by the Council of ALA, January 29, 2003

2003 - ON DESTRUCTION OF CULTURAL RESOURCES IN IRAQ

Resolution on Libraries and Cultural Resources in Iraq

"RESOLVED, that the American Library Association (ALA) deplores the inaction of the U.S. and British authorities to secure cultural institutions to prevent the loss of precious cultural resources in Iraq; and be it further...RESOLVED, that ALA urges the U.S. government to provide funding for the reconstruction and rebuilding of libraries and other cultural institutions in Iraq and to collaborate with UNESCO and other international and national bodies working to remedy this loss to the cultural record of humanity..."
Adopted by the Council of ALA, June 25, 2003

2004 - ON TORTURE

Resolution Against the Use of Torture as a Violation of the American Library Association's Basic Values

"RESOLVED, that ALA condemns the use or threat of use of torture by the U.S. government as a barbarous violation of human rights, intellectual freedom and the rule of law.'
Adopted by the Council of ALA, June 30, 2004

2005 - ON GOVERNMENT DISTORTION & DESTRUCTION OF INFORMATION

Resolution on Disinformation, Media Manipulation & the Destruction of Public Information

"RESOLVED, that the American Library Association goes on record as being opposed to the use by government of disinformation, media manipulation, the destruction and excision of public information, and other such tactics;.."
Adopted by the Council of ALA, June 29, 2005

2005 - ON U.S. TROOP WITHDRAWAL FROM IRAQ

Resolution on the Connection Between the Iraq War and Libraries

"RESOLVED, that the American Library Association calls for the withdrawal from Iraq of all U.S. military forces, and the return of full sovereignty to the people of Iraq..."
Adopted by the Council of ALA on June 29, 2005

2006 - ON GENOCIDE

Resolution on the Darfur Genocide

"WHEREAS, over the past three years between 180,000 and 400,000 civilians have been killed in the Darfur region of Sudan, 2,000,000 people have been displaced, 2,000 villages have been burned and their wells poisoned, and women of all ages have been raped by government-supported Janjaweed militias..;

RESOLVED, that the American Library Association Council urges all the relevant ALA units and the profession-at-large to highlight and explain the Darfur genocide through collections, programs, displays, resource guides, and other suitable means..."
Adopted by the Council of ALA on June 27, 2006

Loriene Roy, ALA President 2007-08; Blog & Website

President Roy's e-mail to ALA Council has many links to her presidential projects, Working Circles, and more.
=======
Dear Council,

I look forward to working with and learning from you over
the upcoming year.

Feel free to visit my website for updates on my activities.
You'll find these at http://www.lorieneroy.com.
Features of the website include:

1. A News section.
Here is a link to my diary-format blog, a link to
a biographical article that appeared in our Austin
American Statesman on 28 June 2007, and YouTube
clips of Bella Corda, the young person's strings
group that performed at the inaugural banquet.

2. A Platform section that provides an overview of our work.

3. A Working Circles section identifying our Task Forces and
their charges.

4. Media & Schedule.
You can check here to see if I might be traveling
to an event near you. My next event is the Trejo
Foster Foundation Institute in Tucson, 12-14
July 2007.

I also post diary-format notes on my blog
(www.lorieneroy.blogspot.com). I invite comments on our
task force efforts through the subject blogs (linked under
the "Working Circles" area on the website). You can also
email me at loriene@ischool.utexas.edu with any questions
or comments.

Basil Johnston reminds us, that according to traditional
Anishinabe (Ojibwe or Chippewa) culture:

"Leadership is predicated upon persuasion.
[It is] exercised upon circumstances and need.
[It is] temporary and intermittent.
The act of leading is without compulsion--
followers follow freely and are at liberty to
withdraw.
Leadership is a burden, not to be sought, but perhaps,
even to be avoided.
In the exercise of leadership, a leader does not act
upon his own initiative.
In matters that concern the community, he is expected
to seek and rely upon the guidance of a
council."

[Johnson, Basil. Ojibway Heritage (Lincoln; London:
University of Nebraska Press, 1976), 61-63.

Megwitch, thank you, for the opportunity to serve
you.

Loriene Roy
Your ALA President

+++++*********************************************************************+++++
ALA President. http://www.ala.org
Presidential Initiatives Focus on Libraries: Celebrating Community, Collaboration,
and Culture

ALA-Allied Professional Association President.
http://www.ala-apa.org

Professor
School of Information, The University of Texas at Austin
1 University Station D7000 Austin, TX 78712-0390

Professor
Center for Women's and Gender Studies
The University of Texas at Austin

Phone: (512) 471-3959; Fax: (512) 471-3971; E-mail: loriene@ischool.utexas.edu
Faculty website: http://www.ischool.utexas.edu/~loriene
ALA, ALA-APA President website: http://www.lorieneroy.com
Blog: http://lorieneroy.blogspot.com

Project Director, "If I Can Read, I Can Do Anything", a national reading
club for Native children: http://www.ischool.utexas.edu/~ifican
Principal Investigator: "Honoring Generations": Developing the Next
Generation of Native Librarians. Funded by the U.S. Institute of
Museum and Library Services, a federal agency that fosters innovation,
leadership, and a lifetime of learning: http://www.ischool.utexas.edu/~hg

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