Blogs

It Wasn't Fancy But It Worked (most of the time)

I don't know about you all but I'm so tired of sacrificing computer program dependability for supposed ease of use , apps on top of apps, spyware, etc...Is it just me or is the Windows desktop circle spinning more slowly and longer than ever? Oh for the days of DOS and WordPerfect 5.0..(my new-old computer is a ThinkPad with Windows 7, Office 2010, etc.)


  1. Usually both worked on the first try.
  2. If something didn't work in Windows you could try a DOS command line.
  3. Figuring out the commands and key combinations was challenging but so much more rewarding than point and click.
  4. Less things to distract you, e.g., email, Facebook, Netflix, etc.
  5. You didn't have to wait for all of the add-ons to load...
  6. The black and blue screen backgrounds were non nonsense and attractive in their own way. :)

New Books in Amazon Top 100

Libraries: Widening the Digital Divide.

So I don't know if you've noticed, but there seems to be a digital divide. The reason why I ask is because I don't know what the digital divide is supposed to be. I thought the digital divide was about access to digital and electronic resources. But if that's the case, then why are libraries working to make access to information even more difficult for anyone without the technology to access it?

I don't understand how it happened, but libraries are actually, make that ACTUALLY, widening the digital divide.

First, a little simple understanding: I feel, and I feel this is a truth, that the more steps it takes to reach a goal, the farther that goal is from achieving.

So if information is shared from person to person, the steps are small. We should speak the same language and not be insane or not eating food or any other logical thing that normally happens when people communicate. Remove idiotic barriers and we communicate.

If we print out the information, similar rules apply. We don't print the information in the sand inches from the rising tide that begins to wash it away; we don't spell it out with breadcrumbs so that birds eat it; we don't brand symbols into another person's skin with hot iron, unless they've signed a release, and we don't intentionally scribble the text in characters that others can't understand.

So in this world, we print with inks onto sheets of paper and we share those ideas with others who understand the languages we use. And that, I think, is a very short path between having information and sharing it with others. -- Read More

Seattle Mystery Bookshop declines to work with Amazon

The Seattle Mystery bookshop was asked by an author if they could have a signing at the bookshop. Problem was the book was being published by Amazon. The answer was "no".

Blog post discussing incident: Can't Shake the Devil's Hand and Say You're Only Kidding

How Twitter and YouTube Took Unfinished Book to No.1

In a feat that even the best-selling writers might envy, young-adult author John Green's latest novel is No. 1 on Amazon.com and Barnes & Noble.com even though he's still working on it from his comfy La-Z-Boy in Indianapolis.

With "The Fault in Our Stars," the author has overtaken hot books by Suzanne Collins and Laura Hillenbrand. His book won't be published until the spring of next year.

Full article in the WSJ

Book on Amazon: The Fault in Our Stars

Another article that mentions the book: Book industry balance continues to tilt towards the author

Amazon Buys U.K. Online Bookseller

Amazon.com Inc. agreed to buy U.K.-based online book retailer Book Depository International for an undisclosed sum.

Amazon's move to buy Book Depository came six months after the U.S. company acquired European movie-rental site Lovefilm International Ltd.

Book Depository's founder, Andrew Crawford, said in a prepared statement Monday that his company looks "forward to continuing our growth and providing an ever-improving service for readers globally" with Amazon's support.

Read more: http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052702304760604576425752950867920.html#ixzz1RCisjBip

Shatzkin comments on this Amazon acquisition.

Programming Note Relative To 4 July 2011

There will be an episode of LISTen: An LISNews.org Program released on 4 July 2011 notwithstanding the holiday in the United States of America.

Tales from the library...

http://libtales.blogspot.com/

After working in a public library for several years I have accumulated all kinds of crazy stories to tell. After my animated re-tellings, friends and family often joke with me about how I should create a website to share some of my funny, crazy, and touching experiences from work - so this blog has been long overdue!

Please feel free to submit some of your own "tales from the library" - whether you are a patron or an employee! The good, the bad, the unexpected, scary, hilarious, horrendous, enlightening - you can email them all to me, along with your name, at librarytales01@gmail.com
(Neither your email nor your last name will be published - only your first name or screen name.)

I look forward to hearing from you all, and to sharing some of my own experiences with the world as well!

Netflix Helps People Cut Cable Cord, Report Says

Article in the NYT: Netflix Helps People Cut Cable Cord, Report Says

Summary: A new survey notes that customers who use Netflix streaming video are twice as likely to cancel or slim down their cable services as they were this time last year.

Comment: I cancelled cable this year. Netflix combined with over the air television has worked good for us. Having a device like a Roku or Wii that will allow you to put the content on your tv instead of just watching on laptop I think really pushes this idea over the tipping point.

Kindle price melts

In the comments to this story on LISNEWS there is a comment about buying the book Ice Diaries in print instead on ebook format because of price.

Part of what the commentor said: "From what I have seen ebook buyers are very price conscious. When Amazon came out with the Kindle and said that they were going to try and set ebook prices at $9.99 I did not think that was cheap. I wanted ebook prices to range from .99 to $2.99."

Amazon is currently holding an ebook sale and they have the book The Ice Diaries: The True Story of One of Mankind's Greatest Adventures for $1.99 as an ebook. What is the range for the books in the Amazon sale? It is $0.99 to $2.99

I find it ironic that the book mentioned by the person ends up in a sale that had a price range that matches the range that they thought was fair. Here is a link to the sale.

Pawn Stars

Rick Harrison of the History Channel show Pawn Stars has a book out. You can see the book here.

He was interviewed on the NPR radio show "Fresh Air". You can listen to the interview here.

If you do not have speakers on your computer there is a button you can click at the NPR site that will give the entire transcript. Here is a direct link to the transcript.

The YA Literature Rant and Rail

I’m not sure what angers me more about the recent article by Meghan Gurdon in the Wall Street Journal about the coarseness, violence, and overall lack of quality in young adult books today: her insistence that any books that give teens a look at reality is bad for them or can even promote destructive and infectious behavior, or the list of “Books We Can Recommend for Young Adult Readers” on the side of article, broken down into books for boys and girls.

Full article: http://www.closedstacks.com/?p=3336

Can Work Previously Held In The Public Domain Be Recopyrighted?

A legal battle that examines whether Congress has the right to recopyright works that were already placed into the public domain will take place during the Supreme Court's October session. The plantiff is Lawrence Golan a conductor at the University of Denver where the decision has been detrimental to his program as the increased cost of newly copyrighted works has placed a large selection of previously accessible material off limits. The law which was passed in 1994, gave foreign works the same legal protection that US works enjoy. This has huge implications for the digitization efforts of libraries across the country. If Mr. Golan wins his suit, libraries will feel much more comfortable making a great number of foreign-produced work more accessible through digitization.

http://chronicle.com/article/A-Professors-Fight-Over/127700/

Apple Patents Way to Prevent Concert Piracy

A new patent filed by Apple could help the music and movie industries thwart copyright violation by disabling mobile phone cameras that try to record concerts and movies.

Full story

The library at Schipol Airport in the Netherlands

Recently went through Schipol Airport and had a chance to visit the little library that was mentioned in a LISNews article last year. Really nice when you're stuck for something to do (besides buying tulips or chocolate!)
Here are photos that my husband took with his iPhone:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/abirdie/5793384429/in/photostream
http://www.flickr.com/photos/abirdie/5793383449/in/photostream

Amazon Sunshine Deals

Amazon is having a sale on 600 Kindle books through June 15. The books are price from $0.99 to $2.99.
You can see them here.

A few selections:

Write Great Fiction - Plot & Structure $1.99

Young Men and Fire $1.99

If a Pirate I Must Be...: The True Story of Black Bart, King of the Caribbean Pirates $1.99 -- Read More

New to Blogging

Hello! I am a Certified School Library Media Specialist and I have started my own blog with Blogger. I am trying to include things that will make my blog unique, useful, and worth the time to visit. What type of information do you feel is really needed in a Library Blog? Book reviews? Lesson plans? Any advice is appreciated. jfsanborn.blogspot.com

Interesting Debate on the Role of the DPLA

The Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) recently asked the library community to join together and take part in their Beta Sprint. The idea is to move away from theory and actually start building some ideas. Still, like any ambitious idea such as this, it is unclear what role the end product will serve.

For those looking to learn more about this project or just to read an interesting debate on the role of massive digital libraries, the Library Journal has posted a Point-Counterpoint consisting of David Rothman who believes that there should be at least two versions of the DPLA and that it one of those versions should fulfill a primarily "public library" role as opposed to the other more scholarly projects that already exist versus John Palfrey who believes all hands need to work together on a unified project at first that can be carved up later as needed.

http://www.libraryjournal.com/lj/home/890732-264/a_point-counterpoint_on_the_digital.html.csp

Gaming the Archives

From the Chronicle of Higher Ed
May 23, 2011, 5:13 pm
By Jennifer Howard

There’s no shortage of fabulous archival material lurking in college and university collections. The trick is finding it.

Without good metadata—labels that tell researchers and search engines what’s in a photograph, say—those archives are as good as closed to many students and scholars. But many institutions don’t have the resources or manpower to tag their archives thoroughly.

Enter Metadata Games, an experiment in harnessing the power of the crowd to create archival metadata. A team of designers at Dartmouth College, working with archivists there, has created game interfaces that invite players to tag images, either playing alone or with a partner (sometimes a human, sometimes a computer). Solo players think up tags to describe the images they see; in the two-player scenario, partners try to come up with the same tag or tags.....Read the rest here....

Why is the Nook Color a hit among women?

While plenty of people still aren't quite sure what to make of Barnes & Noble's Nook Color, the device seems to have homed in on one target market with laser precision — women. According to The New York Times, publishers have been surprised to see sales of women's digital magazines soar on the Nook, at times even eclipsing issue sales on the far more popular iPad. Cosmopolitan, Women's Health, and O, The Oprah Magazine were among the Nook e-publishing success stories cited.

Full article

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