Blogs

Tubes: A Journey to the Center of the Internet

In Tubes, Andrew Blum, a correspondent at Wired magazine, takes us on an engaging, utterly fascinating tour behind the scenes of our everyday lives and reveals the dark beating heart of the Internet itself. A remarkable journey through the brave new technological world we live in, Tubes is to the early twenty-first century what Soul of a New Machine—Tracy Kidder’s classic story of the creation of a new computer—was to the late twentieth.

On sale on Amazon for $1.99

Cites & Insights 13:9 (September 2013) available

Cites & Insights 13:9 (September 2013) is now available for downloading at the Cites & Insights homepage.

The early, special issue is 10 pages long. If you're reading online or doing anything other than printing it out, you're much better off downloading the single-column online edition, which is 24 pages long, as most of the special issue is a rough draft of a book chapter that includes graphs and tables, which had to be compressed (reducing the type size in the tables quite a bit!) to fit into the narrower columns of the print version.

The issue consists of a single essay (albeit one that includes a draft book chapter as an example):

Libraries
$4 to $1: Public Library Benefits and Budgets--Help Needed pp. 1-10

I've started the followup to Give Us a Dollar and We'll Give You Back Four (2012-13), and I'm trying to crowdfund inexpensive or free versions of the book (and presell copies) through an Indiegogo crowdfunding campaign.

This issue describes the project: Two books (one with libraries by size, one with libraries by state) combining tables, graphs and commentary to offer reasonably detailed pictures of countable public library benefits for FY2011 and how they've changed from 2009 to 2011, and A Library Is..., a collection of public library slogans and mottoes. -- Read More

Cites & Insights 13:8 available

Cites & Insights 13:8 (August 2013) is now available for downloading at http://citesandinsights.info/

The regular two-column print-oriented issue is 28 pages long; the online-oriented 6x9 single-column version is 54 pages long.

The issue includes:
Perspective: Differences pp. 1-7

Yes, Perspectives is back--this time with an essay about perception and value.

Social Networks pp. 7-21

A summer essay with relatively old material--mostly on Delicious, the early days of Google+, and the Great Pseudonymity Discussion.

Media: Mystery Collection Part 6 pp. 21-28

Discs 31-36 of this 60-disc 250-movie collection.

 

the evolution of 3D printing at the library

The smile of a lonely realist

Sometimes a book is worthwhile for one good line in the book.
This line from the book "Old Glory : A Voyage Down the Mississippi by Jonathan Raban" made the entire book worthwhile to me.

-----------------------

The man smiled with exaggerated patience. It was the smile of a lonely realist stranded in the society of cloud-cuckoos.

Old Glory : A Voyage Down the Mississippi by Jonathan Raban (page 19)

'Pernicious' Effects of Economic Inequality

It's been said that money is the root of all evil. Does money make people more likely to lie, cheat and steal? Economics correspondent Paul Solman reports on new research from the University of California, Berkeley about how wealth and inequality affects us psychologically.

Peter Singer: Authors at Google

Sidewalk poetry box

Sidewalk poetry box wins more fans for free verse
http://articles.latimes.com/2013/jan/01/news/la-lh-silver-lake-poetry-box-peleg-top-20121227

Poetry boxes at the library?

In 'Little Green,' an Old Character Makes an Easy Comeback

Cites & Insights 13:7 (July 2013) available

Cites & Insights 13:7 (July 2013) is now available for downloading at http://citesandinsights.info

The regular PDF version (two columns, 8.5x11", designed for print) is 26 pages.

The "online version" (also PDF, one column, 6x9", designed and optimized for online reading) is 52 pages.

Note that this is another case where the online version will offer a better display of one article (the first one) because of graphs.

The issue includes:
Libraries
The Big Deal and the Damage Done pp. 1-6

If you're in an academic library, you need to be aware of this study, now available in three versions: A regular PDF (no DRM) for $9.99, a paperback for $16.50 and, especially suitable for library schools and any library wishing to make it broadly available, a campus license PDF version for $40 that explicitly allows mounting the book on a campus ebook or other server that allows multiple simultaneous access or downloading by authorized students and other users.

This article includes Chapter 1 of the book and a segment of the concluding chapter. It includes eight graphs that will be easier to read in the one-column version, although they're all entirely readable in the two-column version.

Technology pp. 6-10

A dozen little essays about a dozen specific technologies.

The CD-ROM Project pp. 10-16

Moving toward the finish line: Possibly the last installment in this series, mostly a set of disappointments with two bright spots.

Media -- Read More

To Save Everything, Click Here

Book: To Save Everything, Click Here

In the very near future, “smart” technologies and “big data” will allow us to make large-scale and sophisticated interventions in politics, culture, and everyday life. Technology will allow us to solve problems in highly original ways and create new incentives to get more people to do the right thing. But how will such “solutionism” affect our society, once deeply political, moral, and irresolvable dilemmas are recast as uncontroversial and easily manageable matters of technological efficiency?

More details here

Marketing Libraries to Men: Beyond Tom Clancy and W.E.B. Griffin

My thoughts began whirring after reading an article entitled On Men, Elevator Speeches and Market Segments on the Marketing for Libraries. by Library People blog. I had already posted a comment on my elevator speech to the article and then began to thinking about men as a market segment. These thoughts come not from any particular formal research, but from thirteen years of experience in circulation, readers' advisory and reference along with fifty-one years of being a male. Women have two more reasons for gravitating toward the library as men: 1. They tend to come to the library, for the sake of their children, or grandchildren and 2. Women tend to read more for pure pleasure than do men. Let me say about these observations, they are based on my experience with one library in Nebraska. Also these reasons may evolve a great deal as sexual roles and family roles evolve. 1. Women tend to come for the sake of children and grandchildren. Since in traditional roles, women were home with the children, while men worked, women tend to be more interested in nurturing the education of their children and grandchildren. This tendency has tended to remain in our community, even after the majority of women have entered the workforce. This means that adult women come back to the library sooner and remain involved longer than their male counterparts. 2. Women tend to read more for pure pleasure/ entertainment. This is based on three observations: a. Women tend to check out more fiction, narrative nonfiction and biographies/ memoirs than to men. b. Women tend to have a greater variety of genres that entertain them, than do men. -- Read More

Every Book Its Reader: The Power of the Printed Word to Stir the World

Every Book Its Reader: The Power of the Printed Word to Stir the World
http://bookcalendar2013.blogspot.com/2013/04/every-book-its-reader.html

The Bradbury Chronicles

May 2nd posting at the 2013 Book Calendar

http://bookcalendar2013.blogspot.com/2013/05/the-bradbury-chronicles-life-of-ray.html

Cites & Insights 13:6 (June 2013) now available

The June 2013 Cites & Insights (13:6) is now available for downloading from http://citesandinsights.info/

The issue is available as a 42-page print-oriented two-column PDF or an 81-page single-column 6x9" online-oriented PDF.

You might think of this as a side-effect issue, as both pieces grow out of work done for the Open Access preconference I did at the Washington/Oregon Library Associations joint conference last week:
The Front: The Big Deal and the Damage Done: Available Now (pg.1)

The Big Deal and the Damage Done ($9.99 PDF ebook, $16.50 paperback) is a study of U.S. academic library spending between 2000 and 2010 for current serials, books (and all other acquisitions), and everything else--showing the effects of Big Deals and other constantly-rising serials prices. It looks at libraries by size, by sector and by Carnegie classification. The damage done? Primarily to the humanities and other fields that depend on monographs, to the ability of libraries to maintain the record of human creativity--and to library flexibility to do anything except write checks for current serials. (20% off through May 2, 2012, using code SILEO at checkout.)

Intersections: Hot Times for Open Access (pp. 1-42)

Mid-December 2012 through March 2013 has had a lot going on with OA--enough that I abandoned my plan to ignore OA for the rest of 2013 (after devoting most of the January and February 2013 issues to the topic).

This roundup looks at current issues in defining the terms, CC BY, the Gold and the Green, problems, OA in general, specific recent developments, the White House actions, OA in the humanities and social sciences, direct actions and libraries.

Brought to You by Mountain Dew

A PIONEER in what has become a hot trend on Madison Avenue — going beyond the realm of traditional advertising and into the world of editorial and entertainment known as content marketing or branded content — is hoping to ramp up its efforts by joining forces with a content specialist.

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/04/26/business/media/mountain-dew-to-introduce-a-sponsored-web-s...

Book: Fear Less

The End of Power

Moises Naim's new book, "The End of Power," aims to track the history of political power and answer why being in charge isn't what it used to be. Ray Suarez talks with Naim, also a senior associate at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, about why power is both harder to use and to keep today.

If you don't read my dog, I'll shoot this book.

So I haven't been contributing to LISNews for a long time. Hooray for LISNews.

But the bad news is that I wrote a book. And it's free. Or about a buck, depending on your need to make Amazon richer... I almost wrote reicher, which probably isn't wrong.

But the book exists and you can read the poorly edited version in EPUB for free or pay for the Kindle version which corrected some typos, but probably added different ones.
The free version is here
The Kindle version is here.

here's the blurb:
Billionaire Goldcock is your usual, run-of-the-mill trillionaire time-traveler from another world here to save the Earth from impending doom. But he failed. Sixty-two times. This story tells what happened during the sixty-third attempt. Innocent Peece is the Earth woman who helps him. There's sex, death, rock-n-roll and visits with the President. Then the Sun burns up the Earth and everybody dies. Mostly everyone.

Cites & Insights 13:5 (May 2013) available

The May 2013 issue of Cites & Insights (volume 13, number 5) is now available for downloading at http://citesandinsights.info

[If you want a shorter URL, http://cical.info will also work.]

The two-column PDF version is 28 pages long, The 6x9" single-column version, designed and optimized for e-reading, is 60 pages long.

Unless you plan to print out the issue, the single-column version may be preferable: the issue includes 31 graphs, each of which is nearly twice as large (40% wider, 40% taller) in that version, frequently with more detail.

The issue consists of one essay:
Libraries: The Mythical Average Public Library

There is no such thing as the average library. That may be obvious--but you might be surprised at just how far away from average most measures for most libraries are. For that matter, for any derivative measure, which average is average?

This essay discusses averages and a few low-level statistical terms, then shows where American public libraries stand--not only for 2010 (the most recent IMLS data) but for changes from 2009 to 2010. I believe you'll find it revealing and interesting.

Announcement links now go to the home page, where I hope you'll note "Pay what you wish" before going on to the issue itself.

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