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Lincoln's Code

Jan 11 Book Calendar - Lincoln's Code: The Laws of War in American History

Cites & Insights January 2013 (13:1) available

I probably said it would be out the first week of January 2013, but it was ready, so...

Cites & Insights 13:1 (January 2013) is now available for downloading at http://citesandinsights.info/civ13i1.pdf

The issue is 40 pages long.

The "online edition," designed for faster downloading and easy reading on most e-devices larger than phones, is also available; it's 77 pages long.

I'm now consistently creating the PDFs directly in Word, which means they may be somewhat larger but willhave bookmarks for all article headings.

This issue includes the following essays--also available as HTML separates at http://citesandinsights.info, although this may be the last issue for which that's true (see the first essay for details)

The Front pp. 1-4

Of books and journals: notes on my forthcoming (or here now?) ALA Editions book, changes in other recent books, the annual edition of C&I--and the results of the reader service. Ends with a straightforward challenge: If you want HTML separates to continue, you'll need to contribute to C&I.

Intersections: Catching Up with Open Access 1 pp. 4-40

The first half of a roundup on Open Access covering portions of the last couple of years. This half includes citations and commentary on advantages, colors & flavors, repositories, mandates, problems, PeerJ, history, philosophy and miscellany, ethics, tactics and strategies, and scholarly societies. (The second half will appear in the February 2013 issue.)

Salumi

January 7 book for the book calendar - Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing

If you look at the calendar in flip card mode you can browse over all the titles selected so far.

Dodos

21st Century Dodos

Book that looks at technologies that have gone extinct.

Coke can ring pulls, telephone boxes, VHS, cassette tapes, village post offices, the test card, hand-written letters, classic TV ads of yesteryear -- all of these and many, many more are bid a fond farewell in this affectionate, but slightly irreverent tribute.

Listen to Great Music

Book Calendar selection for January 4 - Listen to Great Music

The Universal Sense

January 3 Book Calendar entry -The Universal Sense

Book Calendar - January 2

Post for January 2

Book Calendar - January 1

The Book Calendar has posted the January 1 entry.

Book Calendar 2013

Site that features a new book everyday - Book Calendar 2013

100 Notable Books of 2012

NYT has a list of a 100 notable books for 2012. You can see all the books here.

Favorite Books of the Year... Everywhere

"What are your favorite books from 2012?" Tis the season when this question starts firing up libraryland and produces massive amounts of list serv posts with you-absolutely-have-to-read-this-book
recommendations. This topic is also an easy way for business, science and other non-library type of publications and websites to reach out to readers. (I find that many of the books that top these lists are more obscure titles that are not on the best seller lists, but that's whole other post.)

Have you ever contributed to one of these lists? Do you use any of these lists for your own personal reading recommendations? If so, which ones?

Children and E-Books

A couple of months ago I offered to give a talk on Children and e-books. Who is reading them, what they are reading them on, where the books come from, etc.
A lot has been written on adults and ebooks, a bit less on teens and ebooks and next to nothing on kids and ebooks except for the pieces on pre-schoolers and iPads.
Clearly, the organizers of the conference thought that there wasn't enough discussion on this topic and agreed to have me speak. But it turns out to be a Catch-22. What do I speak on, if there isn't enough information out there?

One solution I have come up with is to create a short survey. This survey: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/kidsebooks

The one that I hope anyone reading this, will take. I made it general so that anyone with any experience of kids and ebooks can answer the questions.
My audience will thank you.

Cites & Insights 12:12 (December 2012) available

Cites & Insights 12:12 (December 2012) is now available for downloading at http://citesandinsights.info/civ12i12.pdf

The print-oriented PDF is 38 pages long. A single-column 6x9" PDF designed for online reading is also available at http://citesandinsights.info/civ12i12on.pdf. That version is 73 pages long. Both versions include bookmarks for all sections and subsections, one reason they're fairly large.

The issue includes the following (also available as HTML separates from the essay titles or at http://citesandinsights.info):
Policy:
The Rapid Rout of RWA (pp. 1-25)

A comedy in four acts over seven weeks, from AAP/PSP's endorsement of HR3699, the Research Works Act, on January 5, 2012, to Elsevier's withdrawal of its support for RWA (which mysteriously caused the near-instantaneous death of the bill, introduced as it had been by wholly independent Congresspeople) on February 7, 2012. It's a story that I believe and hope will resonate with scientists and others...

And it's not directly related to the other essay, but some might see connections:

Libraries:
Walking Away: Courage and Acquisitions (pp. 25-38) -- Read More

World's Fastest Number Game Wows Spectators And Scientists

The Japanese have stumbled upon an extraordinary way to do mental arithmetic very, very fast: Become proficient with an abacus, then discard it and do your calculations using a mental image of one. The results are mind-boggling

http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/alexs-adventures-in-numberland/2012/oct/29/mathematics

British Airways Boeing 747-400 in D-Check

British Airways Boeing 747-400 in D-Check

Pocket Neighborhoods

Pocket Neighborhoods: Creating Small-Scale Community in a Large-Scale World

Pocket Neighborhoods: Creating Small Scale Community in a Large Scale World introduces an antidote to faceless, placeless sprawl — small scale neighborhoods where people can easily know one another, where empty nesters and single householders with far-flung families can find friendship or a helping hand nearby, and where children can have shirt-tail aunties and uncles just beyond their front gate.
The book describes inspiring pocket neighborhoods through stories of the people who live there, as well as the progressive planners, innovative architects, pioneering developers, craftspeople and gardeners who helped create them. -- Read More

I Want My MTV

I Want My MTV: The Uncensored Story of the Music Video Revolution

I Want My MTV tells the story of the first decade of MTV, the golden era when MTV's programming was all videos, all the time, and kids watched religiously to see their favorite bands, learn about new music, and have something to talk about at parties. From its start in 1981 with a small cache of videos by mostly unknown British new wave acts to the launch of the reality-television craze with The Real World in 1992, MTV grew into a tastemaker, a career maker, and a mammoth business. Featuring interviews with nearly four hundred artists, directors, VJs, and television and music executives, I Want My MTV is a testament to the channel that changed popular culture forever.

I Want My MTV: The Uncensored Story of the Music Video Revolution

FASTER patron-driven acquisitions (PDA): a library model

OUR LIBRARY has pioneered what we believe is the first program of its kind in patron-driven acquisitions.

One of the problems with most library collections is that although they may be extensive, they can never be complete. And when the patron requests books on a topic, for example, "theoretical experimental particle physics," although the library may pride itself on its exhaustive collection, with current on-demand and online publishing it can't ever call its collection complete. So when the patron is given ten current books on "theoretical experimental particle physics," it is still a common occurrence whereby the patron will respond with infantile disappointment.

So the current model of collection development is broken. Libraries can't ever hope to meet every need. We buy and buy, but it's never enough for some people. So our library has adopted a new model that reduces our inability to fulfill our patrons' requests down to nearly zero. If the material exists, we can get it.

Here is a typical PDA transaction at our library:

The patron has expressed a need for some online content and the librarian assesses the system requirements of the content and the system configuration held by the patron to verify a match. When a match is found, for example, an iPad, the librarian will initiate the purchase by locating the item in the app and downloading it to the patron's device.

"Enter your password."

"But..."

"This is how it works. Just do it."

"Okay..."

"Now tap that."

"But.."

"And it's downloading to your iPad. And you can read it right now. Pretty cool, huh."

"But I didn't want to spend *my* money! That book was four *hundred* dollars!"

"But the library already spends your money through the taxes you pay. This is faster."

"You DICK!"

As you can see from the model, the patrons get what they want, when they want it, but the cost to the library has also been reduced to nearly zero. -- Read More

New books in Amazon Top 100

New books in Amazon Top 100
http://nonstopbooks.blogspot.com/2012/10/new-books-in-amazon-top-100.html

Includes links to media pieces that discuss books.

Cites & Insights 12:11 (Fall 2012) available--special added issue

Looks like there will be 12 issues of C&I this year...

An added Fall 2012 issue of Cites & Insights is now available for download at http://citesandinsights.info/civ12i11.pdf

The issue is 20 pages long. A single-column 6x9" version intended for online/ereader reading is also available, at http://citesandinsights.info/civ12i11on.pdf. The single-column version is 43 pages long (and tables do break across pages in some cases): Please don't use this version for printing!

This issue consists of a single essay (also available in HTML form, if you absolutely hate PDF--but that one prints out as 40 pages, so again please don't use that version for printing):
Libraries
Give Us a Dollar and We'll Give You Back Four (2012-13): Commentary, Part 2 pp. 1-20

This essay consists entirely of notes about Chapter 20 of Give Us a Dollar and We'll Give You Back Four (2012-13): "Libraries by State." It also adds a new table for each state section (except DC and Hawaii), showing libraries in each size category.

I'm doing this added issue because one fairly long and reasonably timely essay is almost done--and should be paired with another shorter and somewhat more timely essay. Since I'd like to publish those some time in November, and since adding those to this 20-page essay would make for an uncomfortably long issue, I'm putting this out now.

Oh, and do go buy the book...these notes aren't nearly as useful without the book.

 

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