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Tuning into Mom: Understanding America's Most Powerful Consumer

Tuning into Mom: Understanding America's Most Powerful Consumer

American mothers are household CFOs, in charge of an estimated $2.45 trillion in direct spending. They are also an important influence on other family members' buying habits. Many organizations have identified moms as an important customer group, but the broad, age-based definitions these companies work with mask an array of different consumer behaviors. Written by two leading marketers, this book provides a new approach to understanding the American Mom market, examining the mom's influence on (or control of) the purchasing habits of children of all ages, from infants and toddlers to young adults, and bring focus to the frequently overlooked purchase influence of moms on teenagers. The authors combine large-scale quantitative research of more than 4,700 mothers with qualitative case studies from individual participants. Highly recommended for practitioners in retailing and product development, this book will also be a valuable supplemental text for college courses in consumer behavior and marketing strategy.

In Search of Paradise

In Search of Paradise: Middle-Class Living in a Chinese Metropolis

A new revolution in homeownership and living has been sweeping the booming cities of China. This time the main actors on the social stage are not peasants, migrants, or working-class proletariats but middle-class professionals and entrepreneurs in search of a private paradise in a society now dominated by consumerism. No longer seeking happiness and fulfillment through collective sacrifice and socialist ideals, they hope to find material comfort and social distinction in newly constructed gated communities. This quest for the good life is profoundly transforming the physical and social landscapes of urban China.

Li Zhang, who is from Kunming, the capital of Yunnan province, turns a keen ethnographic eye on her hometown. She combines her analysis of larger political and social issues with fine-grained details about the profound spatial, cultural, and political effects of the shift in the way Chinese urban residents live their lives and think about themselves. In Search of Paradise is a deeply informed account of how the rise of private homeownership is reconfiguring urban space, class subjects, gender selfhood, and ways of life in the reform era. -- Read More

The Blue Tattoo

The Blue Tattoo: The Life of Olive Oatman (Women in the West)

In 1851 Olive Oatman was a thirteen-year-old pioneer traveling west toward Zion with her Mormon family. Within a decade, she was a white Indian with a chin tattoo, caught between cultures. The Blue Tattoo tells the harrowing story of this forgotten heroine of frontier America. Orphaned when her family was brutally killed by Yavapai Indians, Oatman lived as a slave to her captors for a year before being traded to the Mohaves, who tattooed her face and raised her as their own. She was fully assimilated and perfectly happy when, at nineteen, she was ransomed back to white society. She became an instant celebrity, but the price of fame was high and the pain of her ruptured childhood lasted a lifetime.

Based on historical records, including letters and diaries of Oatman’s friends and relatives, The Blue Tattoo is the first book to examine her life from her childhood in Illinois, through the massacre, her captivity, and her return to white society, to her later years as a wealthy banker’s wife in Texas. This Bison Books edition features a postscript by the author with a newly discovered letter from Oatman.

Measurement

Measurement

From Harvard University Press

For seven years, Paul Lockhart’s A Mathematician’s Lament enjoyed a samizdat-style popularity in the mathematics underground, before demand prompted its 2009 publication to even wider applause and debate. An impassioned critique of K–12 mathematics education, it outlined how we shortchange students by introducing them to math the wrong way. Here Lockhart offers the positive side of the math education story by showing us how math should be done. Measurement offers a permanent solution to math phobia by introducing us to mathematics as an artful way of thinking and living.

In conversational prose that conveys his passion for the subject, Lockhart makes mathematics accessible without oversimplifying. He makes no more attempt to hide the challenge of mathematics than he does to shield us from its beautiful intensity. Favoring plain English and pictures over jargon and formulas, he succeeds in making complex ideas about the mathematics of shape and motion intuitive and graspable. His elegant discussion of mathematical reasoning and themes in classical geometry offers proof of his conviction that mathematics illuminates art as much as science. -- Read More

The Missile Next Door

From Harvard University Press

The Missile Next Door: The Minuteman in the American Heartland

Between 1961 and 1967 the United States Air Force buried 1,000 Minuteman Intercontinental Ballistic Missiles in pastures across the Great Plains. The Missile Next Door tells the story of how rural Americans of all political stripes were drafted to fight the Cold War by living with nuclear missiles in their backyards—and what that story tells us about enduring political divides and the persistence of defense spending.

By scattering the missiles in out-of-the-way places, the Defense Department kept the chilling calculus of Cold War nuclear strategy out of view. This subterfuge was necessary, Gretchen Heefner argues, in order for Americans to accept a costly nuclear buildup and the resulting threat of Armageddon. As for the ranchers, farmers, and other civilians in the Plains states who were first seduced by the economics of war and then forced to live in the Soviet crosshairs, their sense of citizenship was forever changed. Some were stirred to dissent. Others consented but found their proud Plains individualism giving way to a growing dependence on the military-industrial complex. Even today, some communities express reluctance to let the Minutemen go, though the Air Force no longer wants them buried in the heartland.

Complicating a red state/blue state reading of American politics, Heefner’s account helps to explain the deep distrust of government found in many western regions, and also an addiction to defense spending which, for many local economies, seems inescapable.

IndiGoGo Campaign for Children's Books

A friend of mine is an artist and designer who created a children's book character, "Coach Gator the Motivator," to teach children good habits. A coloring book is already available for sale, but he is looking for financial assistance in getting other projects for this character off the ground. This is a guy who loves kids and is an excellent artist, so please consider donating to this campaign.

http://www.indiegogo.com/projects/234763

First Position

DVD: First Position

Dave Eggers' wish: Once Upon a School

Accepting his 2008 TED Prize, author Dave Eggers asks the TED community to personally, creatively engage with local public schools. With spellbinding eagerness, he talks about how his 826 Valencia tutoring center inspired others around the world to open.

http://www.ted.com/talks/dave_eggers_makes_his_ted_prize_wish_once_upon_...

Libraries might not be able to duplicate what Eggers has done but I think there are seeds of ideas that could be used from what Eggers has done.

Cites & Insights 12:9 (October 2012) available

The October 2012 issue of Cites & Insights (12:9) is now available for downloading at http://citesandinsights.info/civ12i9.pdf

The issue is 24 pages long. A single-column 6x9" version, designed for online reading (and optimized for online display rather than printing), 46 pages long, is at http://citesandinsights.info/civ12i9on.pdf (It's a much smaller file than the two-column version, if that's an issue.)

The issue contains the following essays, available as HTML separates through the links below (if you're viewing a web page) or from http://citesandinsights.info:
The Front:
Give Us a Dollar and We'll Give You Back Four (2012-2013) pp. 1-4

Information on my new book, designed to be a tool for public libraries aiming to improve or retain funding, including its availability as an $11.99 PDF, $21.95 paperback or $31.50 hardcover. While it's a tool, it's also an interesting set of detailed tables on the activities of public libraries--if you're numerate, since the tables deliberately lack textual commentary.

Words: -- Read More

Audiobook Publisher Issues 120-Disc Version of Proust

Lovers of Proust, get out your headphones: Naxos AudioBooks, a British division of the classical music label, has recorded all seven volumes of “Remembrance of Things Past” on CD — 120 discs, which will take 153 hours to get through. The last one comes out on Oct. 29.

Nicolas Soames, the publisher, said in an interview that the new version replaces an earlier, abridged edition — just 36 CDs — that the company recorded between 1996 and 2000. He believes the 120-disc edition (also available for download), which will cost £380 (about $600), to be the longest audiobook in existence.

http://artsbeat.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/09/07/audiobook-publisher-issues-120-disc-version-of-...

Konrath and Crouch on Libraries

Interesting piece at Teleread

Konrath and Crouch on Libraries
http://www.teleread.com/drm/konrath-and-crouch-on-libraries/

Amazon Anticipation

Leading up to the probable announcement next week of a new Kindle Fire and Kindle e-reader, Amazon is teasing us with some never before released information about their products and services. The company, who says their Kindle Fire tablet is sold out, claims their small tab is responsible for 22% of U.S. tablet sales. This translates to an estimated 6.1 million devices flying off of the shelves since it's debut last November. Amazon has also released some information on their Amazon Prime service, including the top four items ordered with Prime, the most watched movie and TV show in the Prime Instant Video Catalog, and the number of books in the Kindle Owners’ Lending Library.

Reinventing Summer School to stop kids' Learning Loss

Making Original Copies

"The Story" on APM had this piece:

Ken Perenyi paints like Rembrandt - and Modigliani and Picasso. He can forge a brush stroke better than most, and for a time he actually sold his works as originals in the big auction houses. He had a close call with the F.B.I., and now he makes pieces that are labeled as copies. He calls himself a "master forger," and he tells his story in his book Caveat Emptor: The Secret Life of an American Art Forger.

Download MP3 here

After the forgery piece there is a segment called Noun Project. Here is the description. If you get the MP3 this is part of it so you can decide if you also want to listen to this part.

Description of "Noun Project"
Edward Boatman started designing symbols to use in his presentations at work, and soon his library grew to hundreds of icons. Now, people around the world are sending him symbols – for the brain, a key or a prayer – to include in the library he has called the Noun Project.

Comment on political post

We are nearing the election and some news stories and books may be appearing that are relevant for LISNEWS posts. I wanted to give some background on my thought process in regards to political posts.

I have zero interest in endorsing any candidate in this forum.

My posting a story that has a political topic, theme is not an endorsement of the specific article. If I am not endorsing the article why I am posting it would be a valid question. My answer would be that there are many articles and books that are good to be aware of whether you agree with their content or not. I would expect this to be a view held by many librarians but I have been surprised how often this is not the case. Too many times I have received a response to an article that assumes my motive in posting a story is me saying - "You must believe what is in this article" as compared to what I was trying to do was make people aware of an article.

If you think an article does not belong on the site say so. If you think an article makes a good point consider leaving a comment mentioning what that is. If an article makes a bad point consider commenting on that. More discussion is better than less discussion. -- Read More

When the Network Effect Goes Into Reverse

The more users a social network site like Facebook attracts, the more others will want to use it. But a site’s audience can decline just as quickly as it grows.

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/08/18/business/Sites-Like-Groupon-and-Facebook-Disappoint-Invest...

Perhaps the revolution has reached an evolutionary stage

Perhaps the revolution has reached an evolutionary stage
http://www.idealog.com/blog/perhaps-the-revolution-has-reached-an-evolutionary-stage/

Excerpt: The dizzying pace at which US consumers were switching from print to digital couldn’t last forever. Based on the numbers being published by the AAP, with a huge assist in interpretation by Michael Cader at Publishers Lunch, it seems that the slowdown has become very noticeable in the past 12 months.

Between late 2007 when the Kindle came out and late 2011, ebook sales doubled or more every year. Since September 2011, during which Cader reckoned sales were double the year before, the monthly numbers are showing much lower (and declining) year-on-year growth. The April numbers showed only a 37% increase from the year before.

I’ve been pondering this question about when ebooks uptake would slow down for a long time. In March of 2010, 17 months ago, I wrote that my hunch was that the switchover “won’t start slowing down until ebook sales are 20-25% of what a publisher expects on a new title.” And I guessed that would occur before the presidential election of 2012. That feels reasonably consistent with what appears to have happened.

Full blog post:
http://www.idealog.com/blog/perhaps-the-revolution-has-reached-an-evolutionary-stage/

Google Plans to Buy Frommer’s Travel Guides

Google Plans to Buy Frommer’s Travel Guides
http://mediadecoder.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/08/13/google-to-buy-frommers-from-wiley-publishing/

Cites & Insights 12:8 (September 2012) available

The September 2012 Cites & Insights (12:8) is now available for downloading at http://citesnadinsights.info/civ12i8.pdf

The issue is 36 pages long. The single-column 6x9 version, designed for online reading, is 67 pages long.

The issue includes these articles (available as HTML separates from http://citesandinsights.info or via the article name links):
Libraries
Public Library Closures: 2010 Update (pp. 1-2)

A brief look at reported library closures in the FY2010 IMLS tables, updating previous Public Library Closure articles.

Words
Thinking About Blogging, Part 1 (pp. 2-34)

Catching up on a few interesting blogging-related items. (Part 2, next issue, focuses on libraries, liblogs and starting, stopping and pausing. Part 1 focuses on issues such as names, comments, science blogging, Brilliant Statements--or, if you prefer, Bewildering Stuff, gengen, technology and the philosophy of blogging, and the power of blogging. Note that this essay prints out as roughly 57 pages in HTML form; if you want it printed, save paper and download the whole issue. -- Read More

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