Closing the Book on Gourmet

It's the end of the road for Gourmet Magazine. Petit fours anyone?

But what does a world without Gourmet portend for an age when millions prefer to share recipes online, restaurant criticism is becoming crowd-sourced and newspaper food sections are thinner and thinner?

“It has a certain doomsday quality because it’s not just a food magazine. It represents so much more,” said James Oseland, editor in chief of Saveur, a smaller, younger food magazine. “It’s an American cultural icon.”

The magazine, founded in 1941, thrived on a rush of postwar aspiration and became a touchstone for readers who wanted lives filled with dinner parties, reservations at important restaurants and exotic but comfortable travel.

Issues remain about who will inherit the archives and enormous recipe database. There's also a new book edited by Ruth Reichl, Gourmet Today, which came out just last month.

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It just figures...

I just renewed my subscription for two years.

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