How To Save Newspapers

David Carr of the NYT imagines a secret meeting of top newspaper people complete with cigars and cognac. On the Agenda:

  • No more free content
  • No more free aggregators
  • No more commoditized ads.
  • Throw out the newspaper Preservation Act.

    United, newspapers may stand.

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    Must suck, being on the

    Must suck, being on the wrong side of history like that. Suddenly putting a paywall on the whole NY Times wouldn't work, it would cause people to abandon it in droves.

    I also think

    The papers cannot blame everything on the web. They have to look at their actual content and other reasons why people might not be buying their papers anymore. Is there really anything worth reading? Some papers don't do any sort of investigative reporting anymore, there is just the same editorialising over the major events and the same information that you already saw on the tv, let alone the internet. If you watch the morning news on tv there is little reason to read a paper in some places. The papers might also be out of date by the time you read them, especially on breaking stories.
    Of course the web is a massive part of it (I personally rely on BBC News Online for most of my news) but it's not the only reason their market has collapsed.
    I've personally nearly given up watching breakfast news programmes as theres nothing interesting on that anymore, I listen to the radio instead, and not for the news!

    well, there you go

    I think opaqueentity has stated it well in explaining hr/s consumption habits. The market for reporting has collapsed, at least for now. Free stuff reigns. It's candy picked up at the parade. The idea that TV trumps print reporting is pervasive, but profoundly wrong. They pick up stories out of the NYT and WSJ all the time, late. When the big dailies go, with their substantial reporting budgets, world news will become fiction. What other press tradition outside of the U.S. and Britain will, or even can, pick up the slack? It's a sad time for liberal democracy. Blogs? Wait 'til the first big lawsuit. The noise will drop to a low mezmerising drone. I hope the newspapers can figure it out.

    And oddly enough theres this on BBC News ONline

    A comparison of 4 different UK newspapers over the last 20 years and their downwards spiral into triviality and lazy 'journalism'

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/7855798.stm

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