If Employment Game Has Changed, Who's Teaching The Rules?

Story on NPR

It still pays to earn a college degree. That is, if you get the right one. Georgetown University published a report Wednesday that looked into this dilemma.

Conclusion of story: However, if the goal of higher education is to "help people live more fully in their time," as Carnevale puts it, they need more information.

"We don't want them feeling their way in the dark," he says.

Sounds like something librarians could help with.

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I think it would be helpful to redefine "college" as any post-high school education or training. Technically it is, but when people my age (younger boomers) complain about the high cost of college, they're usually not talking about sending their kids to a trade school. When my friends/colleagues and I talk about our kids' futures and their plans, I still detect a lot of last-century stereotyping about blue & white collar occupations, most of which are completely false.

My 21-year old son is completing a program in heavy equipment maintenance. His dad and I are happy that he enjoys it and is employable. Several relatives, however, have expressed disappointment in the fact that he will "only" earn an Associate degree. It's time to toss this outmoded viewpoint, present young people with all possible options and respect the decisions they make, even when the decision doesn't fit a 20th C. definition of success.

6:24 PM Sorry - I forgot to sign. My name's Geri and I work at a library in Washington State.

Agree

Every job is important and I think it is important for societies to recognize that.

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