Libraries must find way to draw teens

Libraries must find way to draw teens, she says "As a general rule, libraries focus on little children but don't offer teens that much in the way of programming," she said. "We usually think they're too busy with gym, soccer, football and other activities," she said.

"They usually come back when they're older adults, but we usually miss serving those in their teen years."

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As hundreds of libraries have been doing for years

Hundreds--literally, and possibly thousands--of libraries have teen centers, teen blogs, teen advisory groups, teen programs, teen reading clubs, teen poetry circles, what have you, and have had for years.

Whenever someone says "as a general rule" about public libraries, my BS-meter goes up to 11. Maybe the libraries in her area aren't doing it, but lots of libraries (including most of those I'm acquainted with around here) certainly are.

Not that effective teen-oriented programs aren't good ideas; it's the "nobody does this" angle that peeves me.

Public libraries most especially

My first experience as a voluntary worker was at a public library and it involved assisting the librarians to lead young teenage reading groups. This particular programme was desinged to help teegagers develop their reading and literacy skills. There were occasions whereby, the turn-out in few of the branches were very impressive.

The Third Place

My local library in Auburn Indiana has three library buildings... The Main Library. The Geneological Library and The Third Place which is a teen library. As understand it, adults need to be escorted by the youths in The Third Place.

- Bill

Problem is ...

Whatever you do if the teens won't go in they won't go in.
People of every age both do and don't use libraries. You can't force them, just have what they might need when they do come in.

We see 100-150 teens every

We see 100-150 teens every day after school and have for the last 5 years. We offer everything from science programming (requested by teens who saw us doing it with elementary age kids), videogaming, book clubs, cooking classes, tutoring and financial aid help, animation programs (how to do), craft programs, cartooning programs and and and.....oh yeah and they check out real honest to goodness books. We even see our older teens coming in now that they are driving to get their own reading material.

Teen programming is a must for libraries just as adult and child programming is....

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