Gov Docs Digitization Ranking Survey respond by Jul 23

Daniel writes "The Government Printing Office is in the processing of selecting "legacy" (i.e. in print or microfiche) government publications to digitize and place on the Internet. If your library would like to express an opinion of what should go up first, point your browser to:gpoaccess.govHere's a brief background on the survey from GPO:----------GPO recently conducted a survey to compile a list of priority government documents titles or series that should be among the early items to be digitized. This list has been compiled and is now available for ranking, which is open to all. All non-depository votes will be tallied separately. The ranking period will close on July 23rd.When the ranking is completed, GPO will make the results known, both as a single consolidated list, and also as separate lists by library type. This will make it possible to identify the overall priorities of the community as well as to identify the titles that are of greatest interest to specific types of libraries, such as public libraries, law libraries or state libraries. The lists will serve to focus attention on high interest titles and provide suggestions for institutions that are planning digitization projects. Libraries will be free to digitize other parts of the legacy collection based on institutional interests and local needs.Please note: Each library may submit a list of up to 10 titles and may only submit once. If multiple submissions are received, the LAST submission will be tallied. You may also view a list of titles without submitting in HTML or Excel (XLS, 57KB).-----------Please take the survey. It's your information. Use it!"

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Digitized government titles

Some of these titles may already be available online. For example, Cornell has done a nice version of the Records of the War of the Rebellion in their Making of America collection and the Library of Congress is posting Serial Set volumes as part of the American Memory project. I'm going to pick my top 10 (a hard choice) and then doublecheck for online versions to make sure my votes are for things I can't see now. This is a wonderful project for those of us without easy access to a large documents collection.

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