Remembering Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

kathleen de la pena mccook writes "Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. at the Library of Congress, Washington D.C. Public Library and Stanford University.

"I refuse to accept the view that mankind is so tragically bound to the starless midnight of racism and war that the bright daybreak of peace and brotherhood can never become a reality."

Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.,
"Nobel Prize Acceptance Speech,"
December 10, 1964.

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Nobel Prize Lecture is avalable January 15 in history at the Library of Congress.

For hundreds of thousands of Americans across the country, January 16 will be a day "on" for service -- not just a day off from work -- as they honor Martin Luther King Jr. by engaging in service activities for their communities and neighbors. Citizens in every state will join together to tutor children, build homes, clean parks, paint classrooms, deliver meals, and perform countless other acts of service.

Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial Library in Washington, D.C.
The King Mural, © the District of Columbia Public Library, by artist Don Miller, is a tour de force --the nation's definitive visual documentation of Dr. King's great influence on modern American society.

Martin Luther King Jr.-King Papers Project at Stanford. The King Papers Project's principal mission is to publish a definitive fourteen-volume edition of King's most significant correspondence, sermons, speeches, published writings, and unpublished manuscripts.

"If we do not act, we shall surely be dragged down the long, dark, and shameful corridors of time reserved for those who possess power without compassion, might without morality, and strength without sight."
— King, Martin Luther, Jr.

Beyond Vietnam
New York, N.Y.
4 April 1967."

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