By Douglass Shand-Tucci. The Crimson Letter.

By Douglass Shand-Tucci in the book The Crimson Letter page 350...
...
Nor do I mind as much as I should that the Boston Public Library still
refuses to publish (though they have duly paid for it) my evidently too
inclusive guide to that landmark.
...
pages 49 and 79...
...
We know something more of these clubs
[St. Botolph Club, Tavern Club]
from the more intimate memories of some of their leading members.

Theodore Dwight, for instance.

He was appointed director of the Boston Public Library on the eve of
the opening of its palatal new building Copley Square, and his
lifestyle sheds much light on these circles in the 1890's.
...
This at a time when Leaves of Grass, locked up at Harvard's library,
was also double-starred at the Boston Public Library--Lent only on
application to adult students.
...
Dwight was close to Henry Adams as well as to
Isabella Stewart Gardner, and also knew well the Harvard scientist
mentioned in Chapter 1, William Woodworth.

The nature of these intimacies?

Consider Dwight's correspondence with Gardner

"of a nature 'in his words' quite too confidential to have been written
  with propriety."
...
Homosexuality in Boston, particularly in this era, is itself very sotto
voce. But, like the figure in the carpet, if one listens and looks
hard, it can be pretty evident.
...

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