Stereotypes still an issue

The Dallas News has this article on librarians and stereotypes. There is a special section of librarian jokes and how some are fed up with it. I happen to love librarian jokes...if you have any, please post them.\"Stereotypes are stereotypes, and whatever the field or profession, it\'s a matter of taking a look at the person as an individual,\" said Kathleen Walsh, Chicago Public Library spokeswoman. \"But librarians are probably some of the most articulate, smart and energetic people you\'ll come across.\"

\"The Internet is full of librarian humor. Yahoo! even has a separate category for it.\"

\"But Caron Viglianco, 38, a librarian at John Carroll University in Ohio, isn\'t laughing.We fight against that a lot,\" she said. \"It always angers me when I hear that \'Car Talk\' [National Public Radio] program, because those two guys always are putting librarians down.\"

\"Others say the stereotypes aren\'t worth fretting about.\"

\"Some people in the profession get hot and bothered by it,\" said Sue Woodson, a librarian at Johns Hopkins University who enjoys wearing comfortable dresses. \"I don\'t care. They can think what they want. It\'s a profession that encompasses a lot of different jobs.\"

\"Some are moving away from the librarian title. Companies now advertise for information specialists rather than librarians, Ms. Atkinson said.\"

\"They\'re probably changing the name because of stereotypes,\" she said.\"

\"As evidenced at the conference, librarians deal with issues well beyond cataloging. One hot topic was the legislation that recently passed Congress mandating filters on library computers. Today, 15 percent of public libraries have Internet filters, said association president Sarah Long.\"

\"It\'s better if people learn how to use the Internet without having for-profit corporations deciding what people can see and what they can\'t,\" Ms. Long said.\"

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