5 reasons you should have a library card

In his Search/Research blog, Google's research scientist Daniel Russell has this to say about using all the research tools at your disposal, the most important of which just may be the humble library card.

"One of the more powerful research tools you can have is a library card.

I’ve written about why libraries are great before, but this is worth repeating: A library card is instant access to a world of resources. Both offline AND online.

That might surprise you, but here are 5 reasons why you want a library card to be a great researcher."

The Jacket Designer's Challenge: To Capture A Book By Its Cover

Peter Mendelsund estimates he's designed "somewhere between 600 and 1,000 book covers," ranging from Crime and Punishment to Girl with the Dragon Tattoo. But the self-taught, sought-after designer says he spends a lot of time reading, too.

"It's always surprising to people when they come to my office or they walk by my door and they see me with my feet kicked up with a manuscript," he tells Fresh Air's Dave Davies. "But I read constantly from the moment I wake up to the moment I go to sleep."

Now Mendelsund has designed the covers for two new books of his own. Cover is a collection of hundreds of his book covers, including many that were rejected, along with commentaries on his technique. What We See When We Read is about how words give rise to images in our minds.

Full piece here:
http://www.npr.org/2014/10/16/345548582/the-jacket-designers-challenge-to-capture-a-book-by-...

A girl with a book

From YouTube Stars, Literary Lions

Book Publishers Sweep Video Site for a New Wave of Authors

Publishers seeking the next hit author have a new hunting ground: YouTube.

A wave of titles written by YouTube personalities is hitting the shelves this month as book publishers bet on the power of online media. They made a similar bet several years ago on books by popular food bloggers, such as Ree Drummond and Julie Powell.

http://online.wsj.com/articles/from-youtube-stars-literary-lions-1413150001?mod=WSJ_TechWSJD...

Scrolls

‘Innovators’ tells story of digital revolutionaries

Print book retailing economics and ebook retailing economics have almost nothing in common

There has been a lot of conversation lately about the differences between wholesale pricing and agency pricing for ebooks and about what constitutes a “fair” division of revenue between publishers and retailers. Since the economics of bookstores have been generally misunderstood for years, it is not surprising that the understanding of what changes make sense as we switch to digital have also been misunderstood. A better grounding in the print book economic realities might enable a more informed discussion of what makes sense for digital.

http://www.idealog.com/blog/print-book-retailing-economics-ebook-retailing-economics-almost-...

As You Wish

Let me ‘splain… no, there is too much. let me sum up.

Actor Cary Elwes, best known for his dashing performance as the heroic farm boy Westley in The Princess Bride, has a new book out, full of memories from the cast of the cult classic.

Full piece on NPR

The Copyright Wars: Three Centuries of Trans-Atlantic Battle

The Copyright Wars: Three Centuries of Trans-Atlantic Battle

Today's copyright wars can seem unprecedented. Sparked by the digital revolution that has made copyright--and its violation--a part of everyday life, fights over intellectual property have pitted creators, Hollywood, and governments against consumers, pirates, Silicon Valley, and open-access advocates. But while the digital generation can be forgiven for thinking the dispute between, for example, the publishing industry and Google is completely new, the copyright wars in fact stretch back three centuries--and their history is essential to understanding today's battles. The Copyright Wars--the first major trans-Atlantic history of copyright from its origins to today--tells this important story. -- Read More

Big Apple News: Amazon To Open Brick-And-Mortar Store

Amazon, the giant Internet retailer, is taking a step into the physical world with plans to open a brick-and-mortar store in New York City.

Full piece here.

Someone's Reading that ebook Along with You, Could Be the NSA

Via ars Technica : Adobe's ebook reader sends your reading logs back to Adobe in plain Text. Doesn't this go against a basic rule of librarianship?

Boston Archivists Demand Patience

A copper box sealed for over 113 years inside the head of a piece of statuary, a lion, at the Old State House in Boston has finally been opened.

Inside... there was a surprise book with a red cover...but we don't know the title or contents. Historians deem the book and other contents of the box too fragile to be quickly examined. They will need to be examined in a temperature and pressure controlled environment.

The society first learned of the possible existence of the time capsule three years ago from the great-great-granddaughter of Samuel Rogers, a craftsman who had worked on renovations to the building and was believed to have placed the box in the lion's head and catalogued its contents. A 1901 article from The Boston Globe surfaced later, alluding to contents of a copper box "which will prove interesting when the box is opened many years hence."

More from ABC News.

Library Cloud Formations of the PAST and the FUTURE

From The Atlantic.

THE PAST

THE FUTURE

Books are still there. What do you think?

Intertwingled: Information Changes Everything From Peter Morville

http://semanticstudios.com/nature/

This is a book about everything. Or, to be precise, it explores how everything is connected from code to culture. We think we're designing software, services, and experiences, but we're not. We are intervening in ecosystems. Until we open our minds, we will forever repeat our mistakes. In this spirited tour of information architecture and systems thinking, Peter Morville connects the dots between authority, Buddhism, classification, synesthesia, quantum entanglement, and volleyball. In 1974 when Ted Nelson wrote "everything is deeply intertwingled," he hoped we might realize the true potential of hypertext and cognition. This book follows naturally from that.

"Adobe is Spying on Users, Collecting Data on Their eBook Libraries"

From The Digital Reader: "Adobe is gathering data on the ebooks that have been opened, which pages were read, and in what order. All of this data, including the title, publisher, and other metadata for the book is being sent to Adobe’s server in clear text...Adobe is not only logging what users are doing, they’re also sending those logs to their servers in such a way that anyone running one of the servers in between can listen in and know everything...But wait, there’s more."

"Adobe is Spying on Users, Collecting Data on Their eBook Libraries"

Grossman’s ‘Magicians’ series casts spell on adult readers

First kind of Kindle? Researchers at University of Leeds find what is thought to be first travel-sized library

Librarians at the University of Leeds have dusted off what is thought to be the one of first portable and travel sized library of books.

Long before books were stored on a Kindle, smartphone or tablet, the Jacobean miniature travelling library was the only way literature fans could carry a large number of books.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2781378/First-kind-Kindle-Researchers-University-Lee...

Why adults are buzzing about YA literature

Young adult literature has become a booming business and one of the fastest growing book categories for publishers in recent years, with more than 715 million books sold in 2013 -- mostly to adults. NewsHour Weekend's Tracy Wholf reports.

Viewers respond to mandated extra reading at Florida schools

PBS viewers respond to a recent signature piece examining Florida’s new law requiring low-performing elementary schools to provide an extra hour of reading every day. Hari Sreenivasan reads your comments.

Hennepin County Library launches website, and worry, for some teen patrons

Hennepin County Library launches website, and worry, for some teen patrons
http://m.startribune.com/lifestyle/blogs/277953501.html
“We’ve had hundreds of comments,” said Turner, division manager for system services, “and have not heard any concerns from our library staff, nor patrons.” Library staffers have been able to preview the site for the past two weeks, she said, noting that it is “far more image-intensive, less tab-based and more like Pinterest.”

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