Prison is a Great Place to Get Reading Done

From the New Yorker, a story of one man's favorite activity while in prison.

ps - don't do heroin.

City of Lincoln evicts Little Free Library from right of way

The City of Lincoln has evicted a Little Free Library from its location near a church in the Indian Village neighborhood, saying the library box can't sit in a public right of way.

The city gave the group and the church, New Visions Community-Southminster site, until Thursday to move the box onto private property or face fines that could hit $500.

Full story

Sweet Surprise Within a Cambridge U. Library Book

From Cambridge UK News:

A sweet surprise was waiting for Cambridge students during the exam period – hidden within the pages of a library book. During a stock check of the Newnham College Library, a student discovered a secret stash of chocolate concealed within the pages of The Oxford Companion to English Literature by Margaret Drabble, herself a Newnham alumna. The mysterious treat-giver had hollowed out the pages of the book and stowed a Crunchie and a Dairy Milk bar within.

Scrawled inside the pages is a message encouraging the lucky finder to enjoy the contents.

The note reads: “Dear student, congratulations on finding this book.
“Take your prize and return with one for the next person.”
The tome is not a Newnham College library book, and it believed to have been spirited in for the express purpose of concealing the chocolate bars.

Jo Tynan, a spokeswoman for Newnham College, told the News: “We do regular stock checks at the library and a student stock taker came across this book last week. “It didn’t have any issue numbers on it so she opened it and the inside had been completely hollowed out.”

SAGE Publications busts “peer review and citation ring,” 60 papers retracted

SAGE Publishers is retracting 60 articles from the Journal of Vibration and Control after an investigation revealed a “peer review and citation ring” involving a professor in Taiwan.
http://retractionwatch.com/2014/07/08/sage-publications-busts-peer-review-and-citation-ring-...
SAGE and Nayfeh then confronted Chen with the allegations, and weren’t satisfied with the responses, so in September 2013 they alerted NPUE to the case. Chen resigned from NPUE on February 2, 2014, according to the release, and in May Nayfeh retired and resigned as editor in chief of the JVC.

YouTube Is Calling Out ISP's That Are Throttling Traffic

Recently, Netflix royally pissed off Verizon by calling out the ISP for slow streaming video. The two companies went back and forth for a while, with Verizon demanding that Netflix cut it out, and Netflix essentially saying "Ok, fine. But we might bring them back. You should serve your customers better." Now Google is offering an even more granular service called the "Video Quality Report," which will allow users to check out their YouTube streaming quality and compare to other providers in the area.

http://www.onthemedia.org/story/youtube-calling-out-isps-are-throttling-traffic/?utm_source=...

Check it out: Florida university library to lend drones to students

Students at the University of South Florida will be soaring to new academic heights, with drones.

College students will be getting their hands on more than just books at USF come the fall semester. The Tampa campus plans to offer remote-controlled drones for students to check out for school-related projects.
It's a bold move considering that more places are starting to limit the access of drones, including the National Park Service, which announced a temporary ban on the use of drones on Friday. The NPS announcement basically bars the access of unmanned devices to 84 million acres of land in the U.S.

Yet, USF is taking a different approach to drones, making the technology more accessible to its students. The library purchased two drones with some leftover money from a grant to remodel its facility with new technology. These drones are capable of taking aerial video and photography.

Full article

Post-Apocalyptic World Falls Flat In 'California'

Edan Lepucki's debut, California, sold thousands of copies even before the official publication date when talk-show host Stephen Colbert urged readers to pre-order it from a national independent chain as a protest against the "books-and-everything else" giant, Amazon. It was a powerful campaign and regardless of how one feels about the online retailer, and the stranglehold many acknowledge it has on the global book market, this encouragement to support local and independent booksellers and to champion the work of a new novelist definitely gets my vote.

Full review:
http://www.npr.org/2014/07/07/329529037/post-apocalyptic-world-falls-flat-in-california

Newspaper Readership Then, Now, and in the Future

Obama Library Shown as an Outhouse in Norfolk NE Parade

From Omaha.com, a tasteless display during a July 4th parade.

Not the contest winner.

A Presidential Contest For Obama's Library

http://www.npr.org/2014/07/07/328555220/a-presidential-contest-for-obamas-library

There are 13 in the United States run by the National Archives, and when President Obama leaves office, the construction of the 14th library won't be far behind.

A created to fund and build the Obama presidential library is already beginning to mull proposals from contenders who'd like to be home to the facility.

Think of this fight over a presidential library like a boxing match with contenders in three corners of the ring — all looking to win the big prize and all claiming a connection to Obama.

Book: Virtual Unreality

Article about book in the NYT - Online, the Lying Is Easy

Article at Teleread about book - Virtual Unreality looks virtually imbecilic from the cover on in (Note: I think the cover is kind of fun)

With eBooks Still Pricey, Illinois Libraries Flex Their Marketing Muscle

It’s a rare thing in a free market when a customer is refused the ability to buy a company’s product and is told its money is no good here.

- Maureen Sullivan, 9/28/2012 – An Open Letter to America’s Publishers

When Sullivan penned this letter as President of the American Library Association, she was worried about the future of libraries. The ALA sought public support over a dispute between libraries and Big 5 publishers in much the same way that Hachette Book Group is currently enlisting authors in its fight over book pricing with Amazon. The problem was simple. Library patrons were reading more and more eBooks.

Full story here.

thoughts on region restrictions in ebook DRM

http://www.antipope.org/charlie/blog-static/2014/07/some-rambling-thoughts-on-regi.html

In principle, I oppose region restrictions. As a reader, they make me itch. But in practice, the way book distribution works across international borders is worse than imperfect: it's broken. If I sell world English language rights to one of my books to a publisher, that publisher can't just print and distribute the book everywhere in the English-speaking world. Publishers used to be regional, not global, players. And even in the wake of the wave of takeovers that resulted in the Big Six Five owning about 70% of the business, mergers between publishing houses are incredibly slow and complicated due to contractual encumbrances.

Parade float sparks political firestorm

A parade float that rolled down the streets of Norfolk, Neb., on Friday is drawing national attention and statewide debate.

The float featured a wooden outhouse labeled 'Obama Presidential Library', next to an upright figure in overalls.

Parade organizers said the float was one of the most popular in the show and received an honorable mention award.

Story at Nebraska local news station: http://www.ketv.com/news/parada-float-sparks-political-firestorm/26817664#ixzz36n4oShkm

Washington Post story.

FOX News story here.

Story in Nebraska newspaper.

The Pulp Magazines Project

The Pulp Magazines Project is an open-access digital archive dedicated to the study and preservation of one of the twentieth century's most influential literary & artistic forms: the all-fiction pulpwood magazine. The Project also provides information on the history of this important but long neglected medium, along with biographies of pulp authors, artists, and their publishers.
http://www.pulpmags.org/default.htm

Finding empowerment in the words of our founding fathers

We have lost something in our reading of the Declaration of Independence. This is the argument of Danielle Allen's new book, "Our Declaration," where she explores the document through a careful look at the words themselves. Jeffrey Brown talks to Allen about her findings, and why the Declaration is actually a coherent argument of equality.

1776


America’s beloved and distinguished historian presents, in a book of breathtaking excitement, drama, and narrative force, the stirring story of the year of our nation’s birth, 1776, interweaving, on both sides of the Atlantic, the actions and decisions that led Great Britain to undertake a war against her rebellious colonial subjects and that placed America’s survival in the hands of George Washington.

In this masterful book, David McCullough tells the intensely human story of those who marched with General George Washington in the year of the Declaration of Independence—when the whole American cause was riding on their success, without which all hope for independence would have been dashed and the noble ideals of the Declaration would have amounted to little more than words on paper.

Based on extensive research in both American and British archives, 1776 is a powerful drama written with extraordinary narrative vitality. It is the story of Americans in the ranks, men of every shape, size, and color, farmers, schoolteachers, shoemakers, no-accounts, and mere boys turned soldiers. And it is the story of the King’s men, the British commander, William Howe, and his highly disciplined redcoats who looked on their rebel foes with contempt and fought with a valor too little known. -- Read More

E-Readers Are Dying. What Does That Mean for Book Sales?

The E-Reader Death Watch Begins

Tech writers have begun rolling out their eulogies for the humble e-reader, which Mashable has deemed “the next iPod.” As in, it’s the next revolutionary, single-purpose device that's on the verge of being replaced by smartphones and tablet computers. Barnes & Noble is spinning off its Nook division. Amazon just debuted its own smartphone, which some are taking as a tacit admission that more people are reading books on their phone these days, to the detriment of the Kindle. The analysts at Forrester, meanwhile, expect that U.S. e-reader sales will tumble to 7 million per year by 2017, down from 25 million in 2012.

http://www.slate.com/blogs/moneybox/2014/06/27/death_of_e_readers_what_does_that_mean_for_bo...

Rebuilding Thomas Jefferson's lost library

Moving Day for Priceless Historical Documents

From the New York Times a fascinating look at how invaluable historical documents and artifacts are secured while in transit.

Syndicate content Syndicate content