2001 Pulitzer Prize Winners

2001 Pulitzer Prize Winners have been announced. Some of the winners include....


FICTION - The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay by Michael Chabon

DRAMA - Proof by David Auburn

HISTORY - Founding Brothers: The Revolutionary Generation by Joseph J. Ellis

GENERAL NON-FICTION - Hirohito and the Making of Modern Japan by Herbert P. Bix.

Before Rowling, There was Jacques

Brian Jacques, best selling children\'s author of the Redwall series of books, as well as others, was recently interviewed by Andrea Sachs for Time Magazine. Read his interview [Here...]

Mr. Gates\' Xanadu

Ryan writes: \"Interesting article from front page of (the early edition, the one I bought at the subway station on Saturday afternoon) Sunday\'s New York Times on the burying of the Bettmann photo archives in Pennsylvania for the remote/merely-theoretical(?) enjoyment of the generations to come. Raises the question of archives for archives\' sake, why have \'em if we can\'t use \'em, private property vs. public\'s claim on cultural legacy. I didn\'t know much about the state of the Bettmann archives before I read this--

Full NY Times Story \"

Down By Law

Librarians are popping up in the darndest places these days. The Rogue Librarian, Carrie Bickner, has a Story over on A List Apart


Her story Down By Law is about the new US federal filtering mandates. She says \"The law is an ass\"

\"The flow of information is necessary to any free society, and libraries are a key mechanism in that flow. It\'s important to protect children from harmful subject matter, but clumsy, half-baked measures will not achieve that goal—they will only succeed in sacrificing the First Amendment. If libraries are forced to filter Internet access, the cost will be intellectual freedom.\"

HP Ad Redux

A few days back Helen wrote \"Check out a recent ad
by HP Labs, featuring librarian Eugenie Prime. Not sure
if this is a step forward or a step back . . . The Ad PDF \"

It\'s been submitted a few more times, with
one person taking a slightly different view, one person
wrote:


\"The April 16th issue of Time has a very repugnant
ad by HP sterotyping
every librarian who ever existed - you might want to tell
them what you
think, pages 70-71, Not to mention that primpy frumpy
whatever is not a librarian!!!!!!!!!!!!!!\"

I just don\'t know what to say on this one. In a
profession obsessed with image, what does This Ad say about us?

Free Speech Movement Archives

Good Ol\' slashdot pointed me to This
article
from the San Francisco
Chronicle
on The remains of the fabled 1960\'s
Free Speech Movement.
They have 35,000 pages online now. They say
the text has been entered by hand by workers in India.

Check out the
FSM-A Site to
see what you missed in the 60\'s.

This weekend was also the FSM Symposium at UC Berkeley.

What\'s doing at Yahoo!

A Story on Yahoo! is making the rounds.
They say searching for anything related to the words
\"Nazi,\" \"Ku Klux Klan\" or even \"hate\" on Yahoo! will now
bring up banners promoting peace and tolerance. It
doesn\'t work for me, but maybe this is a plan for the
future.
In other Yahoo! news...Now you See Boobies and
Now You Don\'t. They started to peddle
porn, but gave up when groupd like the AFA put up a
fuss.Remember, if you don\'t like it, that means it\'s
no good for anyone.

Changing English Words

Always helpful Lee Hadden writes:\" The column \"Newscripts\" in the journal Chemical and Engineering News
of the American Chemical Society, April 9, 2001, issue, page 64, has an
interesting account and a review of a new dictionary that documents the way
words in English are changing their meanings. The title is \"The Dictionary
of Dangerous Words\" by Digby Anderson (see:
politicos.co.uk)


For example, \"accident\" no longer refers to an accident any more, but
to society\'s aversions to the fact that anything is beyond our control.
\"...Accidents do not happen by accident anymore.\"

ALA Freaks Out Over Budget

Here\'s a Story someone passed along on the ALA reaction to the latest US budget.

They say President Bush proposed cutting federal spending on libraries by $39 million.

There\'s a rather odd quote in this story:

\"Mrs. Bush understands very well how libraries are serving this nation\'s communities,\" says Emily Sheketoff, executive director of the Washington office of the American Library Association. \"Certainly, the budget doesn\'t reflect that.\"

Did I miss something here? Is Laura now making budget recommendations?

Anywhooo... They say the funding cut could underwrite the cost of 867 librarians at an average salary of $46,000. Or it could buy nearly 1.1 million hardcover books or 161,463 magazine subscriptions.

M.I.T Course Materials OnLine

Alistair Kwun, and others, passed along This Release from MIT where they have some lofty plans to make course materials available online.

They call the project \"OpenCourseWare\", and will put lecture notes, course outlines, reading lists and assignments for each course online.

Other stories Wired, CNET, MSNBC and The NY Times

More Questia Discussion

This week Library Juice published a discussion thread on Questia from COLLIB-L, the second in a series. The first one was published last December. Last July, Library Juice published an editorial called Questioning Questia. At issue is the company\'s decision to bypass libraries and offer access to their digitized collection of 50,000 books directly to students, for a fee.

Children\'s Books are Flying off Shelves

Librarians, teachers, and book stores say a notable increase has occurred in reading interest among children. According to the National Center for Education Statistics, 75 percent of fourth-graders report reading for fun at least once a week. Of that group, 43 percent say they read every day. [more...] from Salon.

Libraries Gear Up for April 20 Filtering Deadline

Although the American Library Association (ALA) and the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) are still duking it out with the Federal government over the Children\'s Internet Protection Act (CIPA), some libraries are already putting filters in place in order to beat the deadline. [more...] from The Columbus Dispatch.

Library Says, No Shoes No Service

The Columbus Metropolitan Library is being sued for refusing to let a patron tread the aisles in his bare feet. [more...] from The Columbus Dispatch.

E-textbooks at New Jersey school

Someone Passed along This Story from CNN on a rather progressive New Jersey middle school.

Memorial Junior Middle School in Hanover, New Jersey, is experimenting with electronic textbooks, some students can do all their work (even tests) online.

\"Principal Harvey Altman said the unconventional texts motivate students. \"And any technique that causes students to want to learn, I\'m interested in,\" he said.\"

Unwritten Knowledge

Lee Hadden Writes:\" The March 29, 2001 issue of Nature has an interesting article by Jared
Diamond on \"Unwritten Knowledge: Preliterate societies depend on the wise
words of the older generation,\" Vol. 410, page 521.


Quotes from the article include: \"For us moderns, all information
essential to survival is transmitted in writing. We cannot conceive of a
preliterate society\'s absolute dependence on old people as the equivalent
of libraries.\" or \"We don\'t know, let\'s ask the old man (or woman).\"


You may purchase this article fro $7.00 if you do not already have an
account with Nature or access to it in your local library. Further
information is available at: nature.com\"

Microfilm or Paper?

A couple more reviews of \"Libraries and the Assault on Paper\" By Nicholson Baker, I may have to read this one after all.
Mark sent along
This NY Times Review and you can find another at NYBooks.com.

If you haven\'t heard, Baker says primary sources should be preserved and that the trashing them is a crime.

\"I\'ve tried not to misrepresent those whose views differ from my own, but I make no secret of my disagreement; at times, a dormant prosecutorial urge awoke in me, for we have lost things that we can never get back.\"

Using Books as Evidence Against Their Readers

NY Times is running a Story that James Nimmo sent in on the law and book records.

They say searches or subpoenas have been sought for Borders bookstores in both Massachusetts and Kansas, at the Tattered Cover bookstore in Denver and Amazon.com.

\"What we\'re afraid of is that it is a bad idea that is getting increasing publicity and occurring to more and more police — to short-circuit the investigative process and go straight to a bookstore.\"

More On Free Journals

It\'s been here before, but it keeps getting submitted, so I thought I\'d cover it again.

Nature has a Forum on the impact of the Web on the publishing of the results of original research.
In a nutshell, how could scientific information be better handled so that they can work more easily and efficiently, should it be available for free?
If you think so, Sign The Open Letter.
Slashdot also ran a story.

Library efficiency draws praise

Here\'s a Cool Story from businessinvancouver.com on a local library making some good moves.

The Richmond Public Library is now offering classes on \"the Ironwood model\" of library management. Deputy chief librarian Cate McNeely even uses terms like \"merchandising\"! I\'m a big fan of this type of library management.


\"How do you do the things that we always talk about doing, but always say we don\'t have enough money or enough time or enough staff to do? We knew that if we did things in the traditional way, the majority of our resources would just be going to checking in and checking out books. And it would mean not being open 74 hours a week, not doing daily story time, not having the librarians available on the floor to help people choose that best book, and so on.\"

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