The Semantic Web

Scientific American has an Interesting Story by Tim Berners-Lee (you may know him from such projects as the WWW) on what they call \"The Semantic Web\"
The Semantic Web will bring structure to the meaningful content of Web pages, creating an environment where software agents roaming from page to page can readily carry out sophisticated tasks for users. Kinda like what librarians do now.

What is MyLibrary

MyLibrary is A Model for Implementing a User-centered, Customizable Interface to a Library\'s Collection of Information Resources.


Read All About It in this paper by Eric Lease Morgan.

It integrates principles of librarianship (collection, organziation, dissemination, and evaluation) with globably networked computing resources creating a dynamic, customer-driven front-end to any library\'s set of materials.
Possible Conference coming soon.

Follow Ups On The Wind Done Gone

CNN is just one place you can Read About \"The Wind Done Gone\" appearing for sale on eBay. It must\'ve been pulled, I searched and found 0 results.


The Chicago Tribune has a Story on comments by the author, Alice Randall.

She says that the book is a parody of Margaret Mitchell\'s famous 1936 novel \"Gone With the Wind\" and not, as a federal judge ruled, a sequel.

\"I would never write a sequel to `Gone With the Wind.\' I\'m not a romance novelist. I didn\'t seek to exploit her characters but explode them,\"

Young Adult human sexuality collection

Sarah Jean writes \"Progressive Librarian
,
Issue number 17, Summer 2000

The mystery and the act: towards a YA human sexuality collection by Teri Weesner

\"Young people viewing internet porn have an information need that can be addressed by youth services librarians and library collections. To ignore this information need is just as inaccurate and inappropriate as young people gleaning their information from internet pornography and cybersex chat.\" \"

Books and More Books in the News

South African Teachers want anti-apartheid book banned, and Quickly Change their minds.

\"The Wind Done Gone\" had its\' day in court, and Won. The judge said it borrows too liberally from \"Gone With the Wind\" and infringes on copyright.

Five good books you\'ve probably never read

The Economist has a really Neat Story that compares the bestseller lists from Israel and the US.

eBook Quickies

popularmechanics.com has a Review of Several different eBooks.

e-books.org is a nice eBook portal for those of you with an interest, not unlike eBookAd.com.

Nature has a Story that proclaims \"Paper could soon be obsolete\"!. It\'s on E Ink\'s \'electronic paper\'. Neat stuff that is pretty much vaporware right now, but if they do make it to market it promises to have some very useful applications. Paper already publised on this subject (no pun intended).

Questia Gets Big Time Publicity

Steven Bell writes: \"Take a look at the April 30, 2001 issue of Time magazine. On page Y17 (special bonus section \"YOUR BUSINESS\") has a story titled \"You\'ve Got Books\" E-libraries Want to Reinvent Term Papers.\" Questia and its plan to offer an electronic alternative to libraries is the main subject of the story, though e-brary and NetLibrary are mentioned. The story makes Questia sound like the greatest invention since sliced white bread. I find it annoying that the story completely overlooks the amazing strides academic libraries are making in creating digital libraries, and no academic library leaders were interviewed for the story. However, some might say the story is just a fluff piece to put the spotlight on one more dot-com enterprise. Still, my letter to editor is on its way. \"

Porn Again

Kathleene writes:\"This is an (IMHO) horrifying piece about the ALA/ACLU lawsuit to stop
mantatory filtering. The author clearly refuses to understand the ALA\'s
position or the real problems with filters. It\'s the tired old \"the ALA
wants libraries to peddle porn to kids\" argument, but given a clear voice
and a highly-respected forum. He compares the lawsuit to Yahoo!\'s decision
to stop selling porn after the \"huge public outcry\" (which I thought much
exaggerated by the press).\"

I posted a couple quotes from the story below. He makes some interesting points.
Wall Street Journal, Editorial Page, April 20, 2001; Review & Outlook, \"Porn Again\" -- Read More

Advice on Filters

Skip Auld writes:
\"Is anyone aware
of tests of an Internet filter called \"American Family Online,\" a product
created by a subsidiary of the American Family Association
(http://www.afo.net/)? It\'s been called an \"effective, low-cost filtering
program ... available for $1-2 per month per computer when used by government
customers.\" Please contact Skip Auld, Assistant Director at Chesterfield County
(Va.) Public Library (auldh@co.chesterfield.va.us) with any information\"


Now that it\'s law to use filters, what are you using?

E-libraries hoping to profit

siliconvalley.com has a Story on a few companies going after the college student market by collecting academic texts that readers can search and view via the Web on any PC. They say college students are \"very attractive to us because of the photocopying and research they do\". Attractive college students... I know there\'s a joke there somewhere.

``The expected market growth will not occur quickly enough to meet the profitability imperatives of all players currently in the market, particularly those with high burn rates and questionable value propositions,\'\' Eduventures.com\'s Chen wrote in a February report.

Stealing from the library

Will the library crimes never stop?

Missouri libraries found someone Selling Stolen Books on eBay. Library officials first learned the books were missing in January after receiving a call from a New York man who purchased an O\'Brian book over the Internet that had the library\'s stamp and bar code.


In Tennessee, after her request to automate the library was Turned Down librarian Elizabeth Potts took matters into her own hands, then Someone Stole it. A giant pickle jar stuffed with money was stolen.

\'\'I just think it\'s kind of low down,\'\' Potts said. \'\'Somebody stole our pickle jar, and that was money we were collecting to fund automation of the library.\'\'

Future for Questia a question mark

Chron.com has a sad, yet not suprising Story on the state of Questia. After almost 3 years, more than $110 million in VC, and a 300-person staff, they have yet to hit even 1,000 paying subscribers. That\'s not a mistake, not even One Thousand.

They had hoped to have 50,000 titles by February, but only have about 35,000 and another 5,000 of them not completely cleared of copyright restrictions.

Bookstores Drop Suit Against Chains

Yahoo is reporting The
independent bookstores have
dropped their antitrust lawsuit against book giants
Barnes &Noble and Borders in exchange for $4.7
million.

Both sides claim they won.

``Fizzle. Fizzle. Fizzle,\'\' said Stephanie Oda,
who publishes
Subtext, a Connecticut newsletter covering the
bookselling
industry. ``Business is not fair. This is a capitalistic
system.\'\'

The Social Order Of Libraries

Lee Hadden has written an interesting look at class rules and the social order in libraries. Since he put Systems Librarians near the top, I can\'t help but agree with him ;-)

\"It doesn\'t surprise me that there are problems of going from one
aspect of librarianship to another. It violates class rules in libraries,
and upsets the social order.
Actually, there is an unnamed but very strongly identified pecking
order in the class of librarians. Why are people getting so upset over this
problem? Passions are heated because the stakes are so small. Actually,
social settings are set up rather like a water fountain, with a number of
different library jobs floating at the top, but fewer identified ones at
the bottom. \"

Much More... -- Read More

IMLS Has Librarian at the Helm

\"The President intends to nominate Robert S. Martin to be Director of the
Institute of Museum and Library Services. He is currently a Professor and
Interim Director of the School of Library and Information Studies at Texas
Women\'s University in Denton, Texas. He served as Director and Librarian
of the Texas State Library and Archives Commission from 1995 to 1999 and
served as a Professor and as Associate Dean of Special Collections at
Louisiana State University from 1991 to 1995. He is a graduate of Rice
University, received a Master\'s degree from North Texas State University
and a Doctorate in Library Science from the University of North Carolina. \"


Full Press Release

Uncle Frank on Baker

Uncle Frank has written a Review of Nicholson Baker\'s Book, Double Fold. He says we, as librarians, have to choose and get rid of some stuff.\" Saving everything, regardless of its merit, is not a choice, but an obsession\".
He also says he\'s going to get rid of those Nancy Drew books.Now that\'s a shame.

Net Filtering Site Hacked and Defaced

This is almost funny...
CyberNanny\'s web site has been defaced by a hacker called Hackweiser. It appears that Hackweiser has a sense of humor. If you type in the CyberNanny address, or click on the link, you\'ll get a prominent notice stating that \"it has been compromised and its admins \"may be \'trying\' to figure out what the f*** has happened to their site\". You can also read more here at The Register.

Library Web access could make \'sexual deviants\'

Someone writes \"

SUMMARY: The Florida legislature\'s resident homophobe is now arguing that unfiltered Internet access in public libraries creates \"sexual deviants.\" \"

Full Story


He also says there was at least one child running a pornography business from a library computer in Broward County.

Library Jeopardy

Rob Lenholt writes \"This came through one of my listservs. It\'s
pretty cool.

Library science jeopardy! \"

Just like the popular television version, the primary rule remains to provide your answer in the form of a question. There are six categories to select from, each containing five answers in ascending order of difficulty.

Fees Dropped Patrons Pop

Janet Clark writes:\"
In Alberta most public libraries charge a membership fee. Librarians know
the arguments for and against that. Not a deterrent, some say. The
January/February 2001 issue of _Alberta News_ story \'Banff\'s very public
library\' by Shelley Mardiros tells how Banff removed the fee and had three
times as many new members as in the previous January:
Full Story

On the following pages in the print version someone sent me is \'Book angel:
taking the spirit of reading to the back roads in a blue Chevy Astro\' by
Dan Rubenstein. The story is about seventy-on-year-old Kathleen Evans who
provides reading material to rural kids, on her own time and at her own
expense. I can\'t seem to find this story in the electronic version, but I
recommend it - we always need that warm fuzzy counterpoint to the filtering
and e-book stories.

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