SIRS Launches Free Interactive Resource Guide

SIRS Mandarin, Inc. has announced the launch of the SIRS Resource Center, an evolving collection of educational Internet resources for students, teachers and librarians. Lesson plans, online reference tools and library resources
can be found in this free, interactive resource guide. -- Read More

Smarter Searching: AltaVista Debuts Online Newsstand

Michael Liedtke [writes...]
AltaVista will add an online newsstand to its main index Monday to make its results more topical and useful to surfers looking for up-to-the-minute information.

With the new service, Palo Alto-based AltaVista will automatically produce the top stories related to search requests. Clicking on a news center at the top search page will provide a complete index of all the latest online stories about the requested topic.

The new feature, licensed from San Francisco-based Moreover, addresses a glaring shortcoming for even the most powerful search engines. [more...]

Doings at the Oxford library

Charles Davis sent in a couple stories on the libraries at Oxford.


Ex-US President Clinton will visit Oxford on May 25th to open the Rothermere American Institute, within which the
Vere Harmsworth Library sits.
The Full Story

Another Story On the radical plan to turn the university library into a pay-as-you-enter visitor centre is provoking a fierce war of words. They call it the \"theme park proposal\", \'sacrilegious\' and \'a desecration\'.

Are there any other libraries that charge to enter?

Filter me this...

The New York Times has an article on filtering. The fight is ready to begin and the ACLU and ALA are poised.
\"hen Jeffery Pollock ran for Congress last year, he posted his forceful opinions on more than a dozen topics on his Web site, pollock4congress .com, including his support for the federally mandated use of Internet \"filtering\" software to block pornography in schools and libraries. Then he discovered that his own site was blocked by one of those filtering programs, Cyber Patrol.\" -- Read More

Librarian convicted of chopper jailbreak

Who says librarians are boring?
Bob Cox sent along This Story on Lucy Dudko, a softly spoken mother and librarian was arrested after a crazy jail break attempt. She hijacked a helicopter at gunpoint in 1999 and forced the pilot to land in the exercise yard of a prison, where her boy friend was waiting for her to bust him out.

Dirty Book Guy Loses

One More Story on the Dirty-Book
Guy. This time the Charlotte Public Library trustees say
they will not change their policy for selecting library
books to accomodate his tempor tantrums.

The nine-page policy says the library offers
collections to meet the demographics of all its citizens
and on all points of view.
That includes items \"which reflect controversial,
unorthodox or even unpopular ideas.\"

Half-Bakered

Jud writes \"The egregious Nicholson \"automation-is-a-money-pit\" Baker burps and gets into mass market at The New Yorker, while correctives to his hysteria, like the fine one in First Monday by Richard J. Cox (firstmonday.org), languish in relative online obscurity.


Nicholson still doesn\'t realize that automation is the key to his dream: guaranteeing preservation of last copies. For a much earlier-- and tongue-in-cheek--reply to Baker (I submitted it to the New Yorker, but for some reason they didn\'t run it) see \"Malodorous Catalog\" at librarians.freeservers.com \"

Disaster and Destruction Along the Information Superhighway

This one comes from The Nando Times. It seems that all over the U.S. crews are destroying city streets, homes and businesses in order to make room for high speed Internet access. The problem isn\'t so much what they\'re doing, but what they\'re leaving behind. [more...]

Can Application Service Provider Solve Libraries Problems?

In this month\'s Computers in Libraries, Fred R. Reenstjerna [writes...]

\"So what\'s the real story on ASPs? Do they work? Are they viable options for purchasing applications? Just as you may be surprised by the silly advice you\'d get from a Magic 8 Ball, you may be surprised to discover that you\'re probably using an ASP right now. If you have an Internet based e-mail account on Hotmail, AOL, or any similar service, you\'re an ASP user.\"

Censorship at US Geological Service

Welcome to the World Wide Web - Passport, Please?

In today\'s New York Times, Lisa Guernsey [writes...]

\"Last fall, a French judge named Jean-Jacques Gomez made Internet history, and attracted a flock of critics, when he ordered the Yahoo Web site to prevent French residents from viewing Nazi memorabilia in its online auctions.

To Yahoo, the appearance of Nazi uniforms and other objects was simply an unintended byproduct of the borderless Internet: the items, which were being offered by sellers all over the world, happened to be on French computer screens.\" -- Read More

Publish, Perish or Pay Up

Wired is running a Story about the reaction to high journal prices.

Since journal costs have skyrocketed to the point where they are just unaffordable to researchers, someone is attempting to reclaim control by creating alternatives to leading commercial publications that have gotten so stupidly over priced.
A new, nonprofit, online venture, The Electronic Society for Social Scientists (ELSSS), is offering journals that are at least 50 percent cheaper than major commercial academic publishers.
This is some very cool stuff, good ideas from smart people that change the market. Rather than just complaining about things, someone did something about it.

\"\"In the next three months decisions will be taken that will change significantly academic journal publishing in economics,\" -Manfredi La Manna creator of ELSSS.

Author suing Rowling for stealing ideas

Law.com is one of a million places to read This Story on the latest problems with Harry Potter.

A book entitled \"The Legend of Rah and the Muggles\" was written by Author Nancy Stouffer in 1984, way before Harry took over. \"Rah and the Muggles\" includes a character named Larry Potter, has a character named Lilly Potter, and they say J.K. Rowling\'s books use similar illustrations.

\"This is all absurd,\" -Scholastic Inc.\"

Privacy Lost?

Slowly we seem to be losing more and more of our privacy. Those of us whose names are All over the web have even less, and some people want to keep it that way, and even want to take more, so they can make more money.

This Story (And Another) on \"the Online Privacy Alliance\" (that\'s such an ironic name for this group), a group made up of Microsoft, AOL Time Warner, IBM, AT&T, BellSouth and Sun Microsystems, explains what I mean. Not exactly a group of people I woud say want to make it easier for us to hide from them.
The ALA seems to be too worried about filtering and Boy Scouts to make much noise in this area. What\'s more important to you? -- Read More

The Last Word on Cuban \'Independent Libraries\'

Ann Sparanese presented the following report to the hearing of the Latin American Subcommittee of the ALA International Relations Committee on the topic of the Cuban \"Independent Libraries\" in Washington, DC, at the ALA Midwinter Conference. Robert Kent and Company, whose emails you no doubt have seen, had taken his cause to this committee and expected a resolution from ALA Council which would have furthered his anti-Cuban cause. As a result of Mrs. Sparanese\'s report and other efforts, the LA Committee recommended \"no action.\" The report, which should satisfy readers as the \"last word\" on this issue, follows... -- Read More

Canadian freedom to read isn\'t free

According to an old story in The Globe and Mail, sent in by alert reader Robert Aubin, (which I can\'t find),
Canadian authorities show
an alarming tendency to \"appease a narrow and sometimes extreme constituency\". You can check out this

WebSite for more information.


\"Canada enjoys a Charter of Rights and Freedoms which protects our right to free
expression. Yet it takes constant vigilance, determination and, sadly,
sometimes a lot of money to protect those rights against authorities who should
know better,\"

Paper Destruction Microfilm Takes Over

FirstMonday has an interesting Story on the destruction of original newspapers and their replacement by microfilm.
It\'s an interesting response to an interesting Story that appeared last month.

If you\'ve never read FirstMonday, check it out, they have some very interesting stories.

Britannica.com Bows Subscription-Based Services

internetnews.com is just one of many places with The Story on yet another dot.com dot.death. Britannica.com is stopping the free stuff online.

The focus of the site will shift toward reference, education and learning content, and away from topical features and they laid off 68 of 220 employees

\"Frankly, I was surprised that the company launched as a free site. Britannica.com has killer content and a tremendous brand with a value that is already established,\"

So Long, Digerati: The Vanishing Digital Divide

Slashdot has an interesting jon Katz Story on the digital divide.

He says That computer and Net use are exploding among all age groups and class, racial and ethnic categories. The much-hyped tech slump has mostly hit poorly run, ill-conceived dot.coms, not mainstream technological use or growth.

SO is the digital divide really shrinking?
Does it matter?

What\'s Up @ Yahoo!

The NY Times has This Story on its chief executive stepping down, and the poor climate it is succeeding in.

While, Salon has A Story that says the rush to bury Yahoo! prematurely is the latest sign of a manic-depressive marketplace.
Clay Shirkey\'s Take is a bit less gloomy, he says the Internet itself is still a growing force in the business world, and TK stepping down from Yahoo! is a good sign.

Personally, I love Yahoo!, it always helps me avoid Search Rage

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