ISI Citation Awards

Fiona writes \"The annual ISI Science Citation awards have been announced! An antidote to the Oscars, the Citation awards count citations and give awards to those that get the most mentions. Surely a prestigious addition to any scholarly bookshelf.

Full Story \"

They say in the world of science, ISI citations are likened to The Oscars, they measure how often a scientific publication is cited in the research of others.

Library inventories don\'t stack up

Bob Cox sent along this from The Columbus Dispatch. A rather Sad Story on some empty libraries.

Last summer librarians in 132 Columbus schools weeded 225,000 old books.
The titles included \"Seven Fun Disco Outfits You Can Make?\", I can\'t believe they got rid of that one, disco will never die!

But anywhoo... Now the shelves sit empty until they get the money for new books, which they say is on the way.

\"To be honest with you, we have not had money for libraries since the 1980s,\'\' said Brenda Gonzalez, supervisor of instructional information services for Columbus schools.\"

Will Printed Books Disappear?

Array Development has an Interesting Story on the digital revolution in publishing.

They argue printed books will disappear because digitization offers not due to the fact that they are cheaper but because knowledge-based products must come ready to be integrated with smart products and digitized communication, printed works are just not ready for that.

\"Printed books and newspapers simply cannot be integrated smoothly as digital versions could. With the digital revolution, the vast human knowledge stored in libraries will be at our finger tips, just as good as if we had read it all.\"

Search engines grapple with constant Web growth

CNN has A Look At search engines.

With the internet over 550 billion pages, they say much of the most interesting and valuable content remains hard to find, and search engines are just having a hard time keeping up.
I never seem to have any trouble, is it just me?

Meanwhile This Story talks about the The Internet Engineering Task Force and it\'s work to keep things moving.

And the USA Today wonders aloud if the Net\'s free ride is ending. Will we have to pay for Yahoo! in the future?

AFA Vs. ALA

The American Family Association has a Story that hits the ALA pretty hard.

Calling the new public library \"the only X-rated shop in town\", Don Otis has no kind words for libraries that do not have filters. He says the library director, chairman and the entire board of trustees have surrendered to the agenda of the ALA. Further, a librarian who dares to stand for reasonable standards risks the intolerance of the ALA.

\"Steal a child\'s innocence and you shatter his faith. As Sir Edmund Burke wisely observed, \"Tell me what are the prevailing sentiments that occupy the minds of your young people and I will tell you what is to be the character of the next generation.\" A morally prudent society can ill afford to ignore the senseless arguments espoused by those intolerant of Judeo-Christian principles.\"

CIPA - the Supply Side

Bryan Nichols has written a very funny and perceptive piece on the CIPA as a Machiavellian cure for our current ersatz economic recession. He writes for the online version of the Iowa State Daily.

He notes: \"Congress... is using CIPA as a way to get out of our current economic slump.\" ...everyone has an interest in getting cheaper, better, faster pornography. The Internet is perfect for this. In fact, according to CNN, 37 percent of Internet users access pornographic sites... -- Read More

Why Vote for Mitch Freedman?

I asked all three ALA candidates one simple, final question. Why should we vote for them.
Here is his answer:
\"From my teen days as a page at the Newark [N.J.] Public Library through the years at U.C. Berkeley\'s School of Librarianship & the Free Speech Movement, the Library of Congress, Hennepin County Library, New York Public Library, Columbia University\'s library school, and the Westchester Library System (WLS), I have fought for free access and information equity. Today, as our libraries face laws mandating filters, the loss or privatization of government information, a growing digital divide, and the outsourcing of library service and management, we need a strong ALA more than ever.\"

Plenty more, so read on... -- Read More

Library Used to Commit Biggest Cyber-Fraud in History

If
[this one]
doesn\'t make some people nervous about online privacy, nothing will.
It seems that a number of the 400 wealthiest people in America, as listed by Forbes magazine, were ripped off by a busboy who used library computers to do the dirty deed. You\'ll be surprised at the names on this list and how many millions of dollars the thug is accused of stealing. And, he accomplished it via the Internet. One item of interest, he didn\'t try to rip off Bill Gates, whose name tops the list of America\'s most wealthy. [more...] from the New York Post.

Harry Potter Joins Comic Relief

Although JK Rowland has experienced tremendous success, she remembers a time when life wasn\'t all that easy. Karen Jenkins Holt tells us [more...] from Brill\'s Content.

E-Book Report

Charlotte Abbot wrote a report on E-Books for Contentville
According to her, the reason e-book innovation is a little slow is because \"publishers and authors are just now waking up from 500 years of paper-bound thinking.\" [more...]

Pope to Name Patron Saint of the Internet

This comes by way of a colleague. Does the Internet really need a Patron Saint? Perhaps this will solve the filtering issue. [more...] from Christianity Today

Who\'s Really Thinking Of The Children?

SF Gate has This Editorial on the filtering hoo haa, sent in by Bob Cox.

They say that CIPA will do what no other ratings system (eg. MPAA) has tried to do, It doesn\'t just say what\'s good or bad, it will just block your access to the \"bad\".
This article makes more than a few good arguments against CIPA, example, CIPA effectively makes public Internet usage controlled by corporations.

\"For the federal government to put pressure on schools and libraries to filter the Internet is far more insidious than the MPAA or other rating schemes for entertainment media, because the Internet is far more than just an entertainment medium.\"

Library Stuff Mailing List

Hello LISNews readers. I just wanted to let you know that I have started a mailing list for Library Stuff. Every friday, I will send out a summary of the weeks news, plus a few web sites of interest, and maybe a few library tid-bits. If you want to be added to the list, send an e-mail to me at Steven@librarystuff.net.

Napster Demands Fans March on Washington

[This one] comes by way of The Register
\"Tempting users with a free concert and the opportunity to hear Napster founder Shawn Fanning talk about programming, Napster hopes enough punters will show in the US capital on 3 April that legislators will back file sharing as a legitimate means of distributing music.\"

Library Card Catalog, R.I.P.

Wired has a good Story on the new OPAC at Sonoma State University. Rather than following DDC or LC they use ARS, a system that is completely random. It\'s all done with computers and robots.
They say librarians are happy and say randomness is what makes the system so effective. Cal State Northridge was the first library to get ARS, UNLV aand Eastern Michigan University also have the Automated Retrieval System. No more browsing the stacks for the perfect book.

\"\"I think there was a lot of trepidation up front, especially by traditional users like faculty who are very devoted to the idea of browsing shelves, and of having everything exactly where it was last year,\" Butler said. \"There was some anxiety. But once we explained what it does for us, then they began to understand the principle at work.\"

Scholars Urge a Boycott of Journals

The Chronicle has an Interesting Story on a looming boycott of scientific and scholarly journals.

The boycotters want publishers to place their content in independent repositories on the Web six months after a journal issue has appeared in print.

See also:
Original Article in Science as well as the Editorial by Science\'s editors who say the proposal puts nonprofit, scholarly publishers at risk.

\"\"As scientists,\" the scholars argue, \"we are particularly dependent on ready and unimpeded access to our published literature, the only permanent record of our ideas, discoveries, and research results, upon which future scientific activity and progress are based.\"

Church Members Burn Harry Potter, Other Books

This is so cool, I thought people had all but given up on actually burning books.
ABC News has This Story on the Harvest Assembly of God Church in Butler County PA.
Don\'t worry, they burned more than just Harry Potter Books, included were animated videos (Pinnochio and Hercules), CD\'s from Pearl Jam and Black Sabbath, and (here\'s the funny part) pamphlets from Jehovah\'s Witnesses.
I guess they are afraid of a little competition.


\"Our purpose comes out of the Bible,\" the Rev. George Bender of the Harvest Assembly of God Church in Butler County. \"We read in the Bible how people, after they received Jesus Christ as their savior, took things out of their homes and burned them. They [the members of the congregation] received Christ and they willingly did this.\"

Book Pulled In Utah

Junetta writes \"Here\'s a news item from the Salt Lake City based deseretnews.com:
The Newberry award-winning novel about a black family\'s visit to Alabama at the outset of the U.S. civil-rights movement has been pulled from a UT School District middle school classes.Two parents complained about the use of the book in a seventh-grade English class at Payson Middle School. They said \"The Watsons Go To Birmingham 1963\" was violent had bad language, and (this is the funny part) depicted a teenager who misbehaved and was not punished.\"

Priceless historical documents being left to rot

Charles Davis writes \"Tens of thousands of priceless historical documents are being left to rot,
fade and disintegrate in the attics of the French National Archives, according
to furious scholars who have described one of France\'s most famous
institutions as being in \"an appalling mess\".
Full Story at
The Telegraph \"

Showdown at the Lexis-Nexis Corral

A lawsuit that has been winding itself in the courts for 7 years is being heard by U.S. Supreme Court today. Freelance writers are upset that they are not getting enough royalty money from the publications and databases that show their work. The article from The Standard.\"The case pits the venerable Gray Lady, along with publications such as Sports Illustrated and the Lexis-Nexis database firm, against six freelance writers, led by Jonathan Tasini, president of the National Writers Union. The central issue: whether the Times and other publications are obligated to pay freelance authors for electronically redistributing, via a computerized database, such as Nexis.com, or on CD-ROM, work that was originally published in newspapers and magazines.\"

-- Read More

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