A clash over filters to block Internet smut

Bells sent in This story from CSMonitor.com on the filtering troubles that never seem to end. Sen. John McCain (R) of Arizona:

\"As we wire America\'s children to the Internet, we are inviting these dirt bags to prey upon our children in every classroom and library in America,\" he says. \"Parents, taxpayers, deserve to have a realistic faith that this trust will not be betrayed.\"

King Speaks on The Plant

Time.com has An Article from Stephen King. He is quite frank about what he did wrong, and the lessons he learned from his great experiment. He makes several interesting points, the most interesting was how very few media analysts bothered to talk about the story itself.

\"My mamma didn\'t raise no fools.

Clinton Library Moves Ahead

Bob Cox sent in this Story from Salon on the coming $150 million Clinton Presidential Library. There should be some interesting exhibits... cigars, dresses, a dart board with Ken Star\'s picture on it?

Clinton said he wanted a building \"that was beautiful and architecturally significant, that people would want to walk in 100 years from now, but one that would also work for average citizens.\"

How to find someone worth Marian

Library Stuff points out that, according to Brigham Young University\'s Daily Universe, the library is more than a place to find information -- it\'s a place to find that special someone in the stacks.

\"My friends used to go to the periodicals section and walk up and down the aisles looking for cute guys. Once they found one, they would use generic pick-up lines to start conversation and hopefully get asked out,\" said Amber King, 20, a junior from Memphis, Tenn., majoring in marketing communications.

Amazon\'s listmania

Elizabeth Thomsen was kind enough to let us reprint her take
on the ubiquitous lists over on Amazon.com


\"Have you seen the customer-generated booklists on Amazon\'s
website?
They pop up all over the place-- for example, if you do a
search on
\"Architecture,\" in addition to the hits, you\'ll also see a
\"Listmania\"
column with several lists contributed by customers. The
customer gets
to select the items they want included in their list, and to
add their
own comments for each item. When the list is displayed,
there are links
to add the item to your shopping cart or wish list.
Anything currently
available through Amazon (including videos, toys, etc.) can
be included,
and the system automatically removes unavailable items.\"


Much More..... -- Read More

Best Books Of 2000

One of my favorite things at the end of the year is all the lists. This One comes from the The LA Times and is made up of their best books of the year.

The list includes The Best Children\'s Books of 2000 and the The Best Nonfiction of 2000

Don\'t worry, Harry Potter is on there.

Shylibriarian.com

Rebecca writes \"Check out shylibrarian.com


Sounds like it\'s going to be a lot of fun.\"

\"The mission of THE SHY LIBRARIAN is to never let an opportunity pass for maximizing the promotion of libraries, librarianship, and the librarian.
THE SHY LIBRARIAN will build a community of librarians and library supporters who will strive to fully promote the exceptional work being done in libraries around the world.
THE SHY LIBRARIAN will create a working environment filled with positive energy, understanding, creativity, good humor, and optimism.
THE SHY LIBRARIAN will strive to weave proven marketing, community relations, and public relations practices into the fabric of librarianship.

I\'m taking my Censorware Project and going home!

Brian writes \"Censorware.org has rolled up the mat. Why? If you like \"Rashomon,\" you\'ll enjoy this CYBERIA-L exchange, reported on cryptome.org\"

A $6.8 million thank-you

Boston.com has this Story sent in by Cameron Hall & Reginald Aubry. Thomas R. Drey Jr. used all the financial information at the Kirstein Business Branch of the Boston Public Library to make himself a fortune. When he died he left all the money to the library, $6.8 million!

\'\'This was a simple individual who wanted to say thank you to a system that allowed him to be successful in life,\'\' said Menino. \'\'He is making sure that the next generation can invest in that knowlege and be successful like him.\'\'

Friday Updates

Back by popular demand (actually, I asked Blake if he wanted me to start it up again, and he said sure), I give to you the Friday updates for this week. They include digital libarries, law libraries, map collecting, library funding, patent records, and latte. Enjoy!! -- Read More

E-Journals: advantages, disadvantages and criteria for selection

Azadeh Mirzadeh has written an excellent look at ePubs in the library:

The Web, along with electronic publishing, has changed
accessibility of serials and periodicals. In the past, scholars
and researchers wrote their articles and published them in
journals. Traditionally, library patrons and researchers came to
the library to read or to make copies of these articles. To some
extent publishers and vendors competed to receive orders from
libraries. The Web and on-line electronic publishing, however,
have changed the way of accessing information for scholars and
researchers. With the emergence of the Web and electronic
publishing, scholars and researchers are able to publish articles
on-line without going through a publisher or a vendor and users
can access information without going to the library. Technology
has brought an easier way of accessing information for librarians
and researchers. Consequently, it has become very important issue
for libraries regarding how and when to replace printed journals
with electronic ones. -- Read More

Loss of originals; libraries and preservation

Randall B. Kemp writes \"In response to the ruckus caused by Nicholson Baker\'s New Yorker article on the destruction of newspapers in libraries, Richard J. Cox writes in First Monday on the need for preservation in the digital age. While Cox finds fault with Baker\'s arguments, he supports the ensuing public discussion. \"

Who Decides What Books to Ban

Who has the final word about challenged books in your library? The director? The Board of Trustees? This article from the Star Banner is about a library advisory board (made up of private citizens) that, through appeal, can be the final arbiter on any questionable book.\"The unanimous decision to change library policy came after four hours of rancorous public comment in front of hundreds of people packing the commission auditorium. Most of them spoke about \"It\'s Perfectly Normal,\" a sex education book by Robie H. Harris, which some have characterized as pornographic and want permanently removed from the library shelves.\" -- Read More

That Guy Who Hit Stephen King OD\'d on Painkillers

You will have scroll down a bit to find this story from the Mount Washington Valley about the man who mysteriously died after hitting the king of horror. It turnd out that he might have overdosed on painkillers. This freaky story takes another odd turn when we find out that the guy may have died on Stephen King\'s birthday.\"The motorist who gained notoriety when he struck Stephen King with his van died of an accidental overdose of a painkiller, according to the state medical examiner’s office.
Bryan Smith, 43, of Fryeburg, died from an overdose of fentanyl, according to toxicology reports. He was found dead in his home on Sept. 22, three days after he was last seen by family members.\". Further down on the page, read about a book that was taken off a required reading list, but not out of the library...and the appeals that will be forthcoming.

Librarian..(aka Chief Information Officer)

Here is a story out of the Wall Street Journal about the opportunities available for librarians. It\'s nice to know that we are wanted.\"Senior-level corporate librarians, now often known as chief information officers (CIO) and directors of information research, are in high demand in nearly every industry research specialty, executive recruiters say.\" -- Read More

Librarian Gift List

Dave Thomson
writes \"Hello - My sister in law is a librarian and I\'m
looking
for appropriate \"librarian\" merchandise for her for
Christmas.
In a way I thought it was nice that I didn\'t find you
selling mugs and t-shirts but thought you might know
of a source for a sweat shirt covered with a book
design or some such.\"

Good question! What is on your
list, or what are you getting your favorite librarian for
the Holidays.More importantly, where are you getting it?

Cyber-library dedicated to researchers

Bonnie Petersen was kind enough to send in This Story from The Denver Post about the new JonesKnowledge.com site. They says the site will have research guidance, reference assistance, links to periodicals, government documents, scholarly works and almost anything else needed to complete a master\'s thesis or other research project. Now here is the cool part, A group of 40 librarians will be on hand 14 hours a day to help with research

New Bible, and Logophilia Stories

The everhelpful Lee Hadden writes :


\"The ever popular Smithsonian Magazine has two articles of interest to
librarians this month (Volume 31, no. 9, December 2000).


The first article is about the new manuscript copy of the Holy Bible
being inscribed with calligraphy at St. John\'s College, Collegeville,
Minnesota. This is the first hand inscribed copy of the Bible (in the
English language New Revised Standard Version instead of in Latin) to be
completed by the authentic methods and techniques from the Middle Ages in
the last five hundred years. The article by Per Ola et al, \"Inscribing the
Word,\" is on pages 79-83.

A second article on logophilia (a love of words) discusses a popular
a-word-a-day service and website that presents new words, their meanings
and etymology. \"Warning: Logophilia is Addictive\" is by Rudolph Chelminski,
and this article can be found on pages 66-74.\"

Knowledge Management Meets the Portal

Earthweb has a story A story,with the longest URL I\'ve even seen, on how to use portals to your advantage.

\"Those people are always asking the question, looking for more information that will make their jobs more efficient.\"

Stephen King\'s Net Horror Story

Slashdot has a interesting look at eBooks, \"The Plant\" in particular. He says that King has demonstrated that the Net is a powerful new tool for selling books rather than a technology that replaces them. He goes on to say that the web site is a lesson in how not to sell and market a novel, and the web is a good way to distribute textbooks.

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