Are There Too Many Librarians?

COLLIB had an interesting discussion recently that was set off by a simple job announcement. Someone was having a bad day and responded to the announcement with a rather spirited series of questions that set off the usual \"librarians are underpaid\" thread that we\'ve all seen about a million times now, but this one was interesting because people started to discuss not the lack of pay, but the lack of candidates for job openings. With articles like Where have all the Librarians gone shedding some light into the new world of the MLS, it seems obvious we are in the midst of a change in our profession, or at the very least, we are faced with an increase in career options. I started to think, are library schools spitting out too many librarians? With fewer graduates wouldn\'t salaries go up?

Librarians are underpaid, we all know that, is this causing graduates to move into other areas of work with an MLS?


More... -- Read More

Internet2: What does it mean for Libraries

Here is a summary of a speech given by Clifford Lynch entitled \"Internet2: What does it mean for Libraries and Librarians?\". If you don\'t know what the I2 is, this is a good place to start to learn about it. You can also learn more at Whatis.com

\"Internet2 is a collaboration among more than 100 U.S. universities to develop networking and advanced applications for learning and research. Since much teaching, learning, and collaborative research may require real-time multimedia and high-bandwidth interconnection, a major aspect of Internet2 is adding sufficient network infrastructure to support such applications.\"

Librarian Career Info

I\'m not sure of the source on this one, but I found a Librarians Job Information page. It may be useful for someone. Includes the following:

Nature of the Work
Working Conditions
Employment
Training, Other Qualifications, and Advancement
Job Outlook
Earnings
Related Occupations
Sources of Additional Information

Library Censors Pro-Life Book

There is no date on This article at ProLifeInfo but at some point in the past the Toledo-Lucas County Public Library rejected the book \"Killer Angel\" on the grounds it is \"Too Political\". They say the ALA stood behind this decision.

\"When told of the ALA\'s stand on the controversy, Grant responded, \"Their position is simply Orwellian. In the name of intellectual freedom, they man the barricades anytime someone suggests the removal of child pornography from a library, but if anything conflicts with their political agenda, then censorship imposed by the library hierarchy is completely acceptable. They\'re encouraging libraries to set up their own Politburo to test books for political correctness.\"

Reader\'s Digest Librarian Jokes

Readers Digest Laughline has 10 Librarian Jokes that are funny.

Feel free to add your own here.

Librarians and Gifted Readers

Another google find is Librarians and Gifted Readers by Debbie Abilock.

\"Gifted readers comprise a unique population whose advocates should be librarians. Influenced to some extent by both biology and culture, gifted readers display a complex understanding of written language, knowledge of one or more subjects, and masterful control of a number of skills that allow them to navigate effectively through various texts. While gifted readers always show linguistic intelligence, other intelligences are invoked in response to the demands of particular texts. The cognitive characteristics associated with gifted children interact with specific aptitudes, intelligences, and strategies to create a \"final, integrated performance,\" much like that of a gifted violinist, that can bestow life-long pleasure and rewards to both the performer and our society.\"

Librarians as Enemies of Books

I was Googling this morning, looking for Librarian Gifts and I stumbled upon Librarians as Enemies of Books by Randolph G. Adams. It\'s an old \"Library Quarterly\" article on a number of issues in librarianship. It\'s worth the read just for the style of writing.

\"There is no need to view with alarm the evolution of the modern librarian.\"

Resolution on the Draft ALA International Relations Agenda

New on the SRRT International Responsibilities Task Force web site, a Resolution on the Draft ALA International Relations Agenda from the 2000 annual conference. ALA released its proposed international relations agenda, and SRRT members, being the conscience of ALA (and I don\'t mean that ironically), responded with a very thoughtful resolution which said the things that needed to be said. Will the right people listen? I hope so.


What do you think?

A clash over filters to block Internet smut

Bells sent in This story from CSMonitor.com on the filtering troubles that never seem to end. Sen. John McCain (R) of Arizona:

\"As we wire America\'s children to the Internet, we are inviting these dirt bags to prey upon our children in every classroom and library in America,\" he says. \"Parents, taxpayers, deserve to have a realistic faith that this trust will not be betrayed.\"

King Speaks on The Plant

Time.com has An Article from Stephen King. He is quite frank about what he did wrong, and the lessons he learned from his great experiment. He makes several interesting points, the most interesting was how very few media analysts bothered to talk about the story itself.

\"My mamma didn\'t raise no fools.

Clinton Library Moves Ahead

Bob Cox sent in this Story from Salon on the coming $150 million Clinton Presidential Library. There should be some interesting exhibits... cigars, dresses, a dart board with Ken Star\'s picture on it?

Clinton said he wanted a building \"that was beautiful and architecturally significant, that people would want to walk in 100 years from now, but one that would also work for average citizens.\"

How to find someone worth Marian

Library Stuff points out that, according to Brigham Young University\'s Daily Universe, the library is more than a place to find information -- it\'s a place to find that special someone in the stacks.

\"My friends used to go to the periodicals section and walk up and down the aisles looking for cute guys. Once they found one, they would use generic pick-up lines to start conversation and hopefully get asked out,\" said Amber King, 20, a junior from Memphis, Tenn., majoring in marketing communications.

Amazon\'s listmania

Elizabeth Thomsen was kind enough to let us reprint her take
on the ubiquitous lists over on Amazon.com


\"Have you seen the customer-generated booklists on Amazon\'s
website?
They pop up all over the place-- for example, if you do a
search on
\"Architecture,\" in addition to the hits, you\'ll also see a
\"Listmania\"
column with several lists contributed by customers. The
customer gets
to select the items they want included in their list, and to
add their
own comments for each item. When the list is displayed,
there are links
to add the item to your shopping cart or wish list.
Anything currently
available through Amazon (including videos, toys, etc.) can
be included,
and the system automatically removes unavailable items.\"


Much More..... -- Read More

Best Books Of 2000

One of my favorite things at the end of the year is all the lists. This One comes from the The LA Times and is made up of their best books of the year.

The list includes The Best Children\'s Books of 2000 and the The Best Nonfiction of 2000

Don\'t worry, Harry Potter is on there.

Shylibriarian.com

Rebecca writes \"Check out shylibrarian.com


Sounds like it\'s going to be a lot of fun.\"

\"The mission of THE SHY LIBRARIAN is to never let an opportunity pass for maximizing the promotion of libraries, librarianship, and the librarian.
THE SHY LIBRARIAN will build a community of librarians and library supporters who will strive to fully promote the exceptional work being done in libraries around the world.
THE SHY LIBRARIAN will create a working environment filled with positive energy, understanding, creativity, good humor, and optimism.
THE SHY LIBRARIAN will strive to weave proven marketing, community relations, and public relations practices into the fabric of librarianship.

I\'m taking my Censorware Project and going home!

Brian writes \"Censorware.org has rolled up the mat. Why? If you like \"Rashomon,\" you\'ll enjoy this CYBERIA-L exchange, reported on cryptome.org\"

A $6.8 million thank-you

Boston.com has this Story sent in by Cameron Hall & Reginald Aubry. Thomas R. Drey Jr. used all the financial information at the Kirstein Business Branch of the Boston Public Library to make himself a fortune. When he died he left all the money to the library, $6.8 million!

\'\'This was a simple individual who wanted to say thank you to a system that allowed him to be successful in life,\'\' said Menino. \'\'He is making sure that the next generation can invest in that knowlege and be successful like him.\'\'

Friday Updates

Back by popular demand (actually, I asked Blake if he wanted me to start it up again, and he said sure), I give to you the Friday updates for this week. They include digital libarries, law libraries, map collecting, library funding, patent records, and latte. Enjoy!! -- Read More

E-Journals: advantages, disadvantages and criteria for selection

Azadeh Mirzadeh has written an excellent look at ePubs in the library:

The Web, along with electronic publishing, has changed
accessibility of serials and periodicals. In the past, scholars
and researchers wrote their articles and published them in
journals. Traditionally, library patrons and researchers came to
the library to read or to make copies of these articles. To some
extent publishers and vendors competed to receive orders from
libraries. The Web and on-line electronic publishing, however,
have changed the way of accessing information for scholars and
researchers. With the emergence of the Web and electronic
publishing, scholars and researchers are able to publish articles
on-line without going through a publisher or a vendor and users
can access information without going to the library. Technology
has brought an easier way of accessing information for librarians
and researchers. Consequently, it has become very important issue
for libraries regarding how and when to replace printed journals
with electronic ones. -- Read More

Loss of originals; libraries and preservation

Randall B. Kemp writes \"In response to the ruckus caused by Nicholson Baker\'s New Yorker article on the destruction of newspapers in libraries, Richard J. Cox writes in First Monday on the need for preservation in the digital age. While Cox finds fault with Baker\'s arguments, he supports the ensuing public discussion. \"

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