E-Mail Makes the World Go \'Round

Computers In Libraries has a nice Story by D. Scott Brandt on the use of eMail in libraries. He talks about how librarians use eMail to make friends and help patrons.

\"E-mail technology really enables librarians to have all sorts of relationships with patrons from around the world.\"

Not a Prophesy

Bob Kaehr writes:

When in the not-too-distant future (five-to-10 years) nearly all
books and periodicals become digital and libraries become archives, what
will happen to academic (even school, public and special) library personnel?
Will libraries be taken over or delivered into the hands of information
services? Will there be mass dismissals of traditional \"book people\"? Oh,
that\'s right, we\'ll just re-train? :>} Will faculty, who can teach \"library
exercises\" from within the classroom (e.g. How to Use Information
Databases), need traditional BI? Will there need to be circulation
personnel other than a clerk and a few aids to charge and discharge those
oldies but goodies? Will for-profit companies become the selectors for the
various publics by virtue of the collections they are able to offer?

Continued... -- Read More

New network links libraries online

This News.com Story on The Collaborative Digital Reference Service (CDRS) is quite interesting. The trial run began Friday, about 60 libraries took questions from library patrons. The first question sent through CDRS came from a library in England and was answered in Santa Monica, CA. The question asked for the most recent books published in English about ancient Byzantine cuisine.

\"Rather than watch idly as Internet companies like AskJeeves, Google or Yahoo fill the void, librarians believe their expertise, research collections and specialized catalogs not available on the Internet enable them to answer questions quickly and completely--for free.\" -- Read More

Open Source Bible

Here\'s a funny one from BBSpot on the new \"Open Source Bible\". It seems the pope does not like it, he\'s too \"busy dealing with all the flamers\".


They even include the Sourceforge page!

Note:For this to be really funny, you need to understand what Sourceforge really is.

\"The biggest complaint about the Bible has been about the numerous variations of the book. Therefore the project\'s main goal is to unify the different versions of the Bible into one coherent work.\"

Oprah Goes E

E Booknet has a piece on Oprah giving away 350 of RCA\'s new REB1100. This is the woman who moves HUGE numbers of real books everytime she chooses a new book to read, imagine what this is going to do for the entire eBook market! Will this be like Stephen King going online with his book?

Presidential Inaugurations Online

The Library of Congress has made available at its American Memory Web
site an online collection of selected materials to celebrate the
inaugurations of the presidents of the United States. \"I Do Solemnly
Swear\" Presidential Inaugurations consists of approximately four
hundred items from each of sixty-two inaugurations, from George
Washington in 1789 to William Jefferson Clinton in 1997, and will
include items relating to the sixty-third inauguration of 2001. Check it out at: memory.loc.gov/ammem/pihtml/

The SLIS UNDERGROUND

SLIS Undergroundsent in a link to their site, rather intersting for those fighting the powers that be:


The medium, SLIS UNDERGROUND, was created with the intention of providing SLIS students enrolled at the University of Wisconsin - Madison with a forum in which to express their opinions about library and information science and their educational/professional experiences within the field.

geocities.com/slis_underground/mainpage.htm

Realizing that much of what we are being taught is subjective.
Realizing that information itself is subjective; everything is changed, greatly or subtly, by the filter through which it passes.
Understanding that as future librarians, archivists, catalogers, indexers, school media specialists, editors, censors, and free-thinking students of human nature we have a right to comment upon and question all information.
To bring to ideas to the forefront and provide a media through which comments can be made for which there was no time in class.
To encourage critical thinking within the SLIS student body.
To show the SLIS faculty that we care enough about library and information science to go to the trouble of establishing an entity beyond the academic establishment through which we can further discuss what we are being taught, what we are reading, and how the information is being presented

Anatomy of a book controversy

Bob Cox sent in In Depth look on some book challenges in GA. The Savannah-Chatham County Public Schools Board of Education initially voted 4-3 not to allow the use of \"In Cold Blood,\" \"A Lesson Before Dying,\" \"Stones from the River,\" \"Lords of Discipline\" and \"Catcher in the Rye.\", then re-voted after they said to make sure that summer reading lists for AP English students contain at least 10 choices and are given out one month before school ends. The books ended up NOT being banned.

\"As far as we are concerned, you are still stonewalling the concept of parental/citizen involvement. This whole process has been disgusting and demeaning. The endorsement of putting trash in the minds of children by a school system is horrifying to think of and it is dangerous to the social stability of this great country.\"

Textbook case of self-censorship

Lois Aleta Fundis sent in This almost funny story from Freedomforum.org on some silly censorship down in TX. The State Board of Education approved a reading textbook for 5th that was \"revised\" after two Republican state legislators complained about a picture of Vice President Al Gore and a brief accompanying article.

\"\"The bottom line is the publisher self-censored this book under implicit threat that the far-right contingent on the State Board of Education would grandstand and bully [the publisher], because that\'s been their behavior for the last six years,\" Smoot told The Freedom Forum Online. \"These members of the state board have a long and rich tradition of going after textbooks for such absurd things as disliking a photograph of a woman carrying a briefcase, decrying the number of pages devoted to (farmworker organizer) Cesar Chavez and even saying one history book depicted slavery in too negative a fashion.\"

Internet Search FAQ

Here\'s a really cool site sent in by Bob Cox. The Internet Search FAQ covers all the bases, \"how can I find\", \"how can I find it faster?\", \"should I pay?\", and \"where can I get help?\", are all covered.

\"Although this website was compiled originally for writers, it has become increasingly clear that this FAQ (Frequently Asked Questions) list is of use to anyone who wants to find their way around the Net. \"

How to Get Books in the Library With No Money

Greenville News has this story on the creative ideas that school librarians have to get books on the shelves.\"In addition to holding the usual book fairs and cranking out applications for grants, they\'ve cashed in aluminum cans, sold candy and school supplies, urged parents to shop at certain grocery stores and use certain credit cards and accepted hand-me-downs from college and university libraries updating their collections.\" -- Read More

No More Banned Books

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution has this piece on a school board that decided not to ban 5 books from an advanced placement english class...if the students are provided alternatives.\"Dr. James Moore and his wife, Minnie, the parents of a former Windsor Forest High School student who now attends college, challenged the books because they contain sex, violence and profanity.\" -- Read More

Everybody is Getting Library Cards

The Star-Telegram has this story on kids getting everyone and their grandmother to sign up for a library card.

\"Students at Carter Park Elementary surpassed themselves in a drive to put Fort Worth Public Library cards in the hands of more students.

A whopping 104 percent of the student body now has library privileges. The school has 775 students but was responsible for adding 818 library cards by also signing up parents, grandparents, aunts, uncles and friends.\" -- Read More

Bookstore has records subpoenaed

For the third time in the past month, another bookstore\'s records have been subpoenaed by law enforcement officials. Libraries are bound to be next. The story is available from Lawrence Journal-World.
\"The subpoena, involving a Borders store in Johnson County, came to light this week when a bookseller industry newsletter reported that several groups had filed court papers on Borders\' behalf. -- Read More

Intel inside... the library.

Anonymous Patron writes "Another interesting portrayal of a librarian in the popular culture. This time it's an Intel ad featuring Lucy Liu."

Intel inside... the library.

Anonymous Patron writes "Another interesting portrayal of a librarian in the popular culture. This time it's an Intel ad featuring Lucy Liu."

New Domains a Step Closer

Wired is reporting The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) has narrowed the field down to 10 finalists in the race to become the new DOT-COM! Check out the final TLD\'s and the folks sponsoring them.

  • Dot-biz by JVTeam, LLC, which is comprised of Neustar and Melbourn IT.
  • Dot-i Sarnoff Corporation and JVTeam, LLC.
  • Dot-name, dot-nom, dot-san, dot-xing by the Global Name Registry, Limited.
  • Dot-pro by RegistryPro, Ltd, which is comprised of register.com, Virtual Internet and Baltimore Tech.
  • Dot-co-op by the Cooperative League of the USA.
  • Dot-museum by the Museum Domain Management Association.
  • Dot-Air by the Société Internationale de Télécommunications Aéronautiques.
  • Dot-geo by SRI International.
  • Dot-coop by Cooperative League of the USA.
  • The National Book Award winners

    Publishers Weekly has the The National Book Award winners.

    They include
    In America by Susan Sontag
    and In the Heart of the Sea by Nathaniel Philbrick.

    Harry Potter first edition

    Charles Davis sent in This Story from Ananova.com on a copy of the first edition of the first Harry Potter that sold for more than £6,000 at auction. They only pressed 500 copies of Harry Potter and the Philosopher\'s Stone when it was published three years ago. An 1885 first edition illustrated copy of Robert Louis Stevenson\'s Treasure Island went for just £100.

    Clinton Can\'t Catch a Break

    Arkansas Online has a Story on the trouble brewing over the new Clinton Presidential Library in Little Rock. A man there won\'t give up his land so they can build the library because his is mad at Little Rock officials for spending more than $12 million on the land for the library.

    \"The city of Little Rock can ill afford this huge expenditure, which has never been approved by the voters,\" Pfeifer said. \"The past two years have proved the ruinous effects the financing scheme has had on our city finances and public confidence.\"

    $12 Million does seem like alot of money for this thing.

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