Working on the Content in Contentville

A follow up on This Story on the site Contentville from Tuesday. Wired is now Reporting Contentville has now agreed all independent articles are to be processed through the Publications Rights Clearing House, that should keep your dissertation safe, or atleast make you a couple bucks.

\"It doesn\'t surprise me that writers are upset,\" magazine publisher Steven Brill said in a phone interview. \"If my articles were up there and I didn\'t know it, I\'d be really pissed off, too.\" -- Read More

Excuse me, Do You Deliver?

So I pick up a reference call the other day, and this gentleman on his cell phone asks me if I can help him out. I reply that I would give it a shot, depending on what he wants. He says that he wants surprise this girl. I ask why he would need a reference librarian’s help with that… -- Read More

Friday Updates

Well folks, it\'s that time of the week. Friday updates include helping hands, cutting hours, toxic fumes, censorship of donations, 24-7 access, no more book sales, Internet rules, childrens books, decrease in circulation, the Quote of the Week, and much, much more!! -- Read More

\'Harry Potter\' sales remain strong

CNN.com has a story about the record breaking sales online. There was an Article on how well the Harry Potter books are still selling.


\"The U.S. and British publishers of \"Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire,\" the fourth book in the series by British author J.K. Rowling, have already gone back to the presses for additional print runs.\"  -- Read More

Social Class and Libraries

Social exclusion and poverty - what do they have to do with libraries? Well, two thirds of library patrons are middle class, while that group only represents one third of the population; the remaining two thirds are working class. The poor and socially excluded, as members of the working class, are not being served by libraries as they might be.


\"Public libraries, social exclusion and social class\", and article in Information for Social Change by John Pateman, explores the issue in depth, going into detail about the concept of social class and research that has been done in Britain on library use. Here is an excerpt: -- Read More

Archiving Today\'s Digital Culture

Foxnews is carrying a Story on The 10,000-year Library Conference, hosted by The Long Now Foundation and Stanford University Libraries. They discussed how today\'s archival institutions will cope with preserving multimedia content such as digital audio and video files, photography, databases, Web pages and even links to related content. They say that most libraries are making a new \"digital library\" online, to preserve the information. This of course raises many new issues... -- Read More

Study finds Web bigger than we think

The \"invisible Web\" or the millions of pages not indexed at Yahoo! or Google is much bigger than most people thought. A company called BrightPlanet says there are now about 550 billion documents stored on the Web. They say Internet search engines index about 1 billion pages, although Google claims more than a billion. They say the problem lies in how search engines index the web. Search engines rely on technology that generally identifies \"static\" pages, rather than the \"dynamic\" information stored in databases. You can get the Report Here -- Read More

Against intellectual property

Against intellectual property is an interesting chapter out of the book Information Liberation by Brian Martin. This chapter is interesting in that he makes a strong case against IP. It\'s a long and well argued chapter.

\"There is a strong case for opposing intellectual property. Among other things, it often retards innovation and exploits Third World peoples. Most of the usual arguments for intellectual property do not hold up under scrutiny. -- Read More

Deadline

R Hadden Writes :Nicholson Baker has written another article criticizing past and
current library decisions. \"Deadline.\" New Yorker, July 24, 2000, pages
42-62, describes how libraries disposed of original copies of newspapers
when they microfilmed them.
Finally, in disgust at their bad decisions about money, staff, space
and acid decomposition, Mr. Baker has purchased his own collection of 19th
and early 20th century newspapers and has started his own private newspaper
library. It will be interesting to see how he will handle the many
management decisions needed in running a library. Money, staff, space and
preservation needs led to this library problem- I am dying of curiosity to
find out how he can run a library without these problems affecting him.

Mark C. Rosenzweig has written quite a response that is also making the rounds on the lists. Read on to check that one out, it\'s worth a read. -- Read More

Hollywood looks to kill hyperlinks

CNET has a Story that covers all the latest in the never ending world of internet lawsuits. Some of these cases challenge the very Existence of the Web

\"It all depends on how broadly the opinion is written,\" said Eugene Volokh, a law professor at the University of California at Los Angeles. \"If an opinion is quite broad, it would interfere with a lot of things on the Web. But I don\'t think it\'s likely that a court would issue such an opinion.\" -- Read More

Striking Librarians Beware

According to this article from Cantonrep.com, some library workers are going on strike and the library has hired security guards to protect those who decide to come to work.\"But Anne Mueller, leader of the Service Employees International Union in Cleveland, said the guards will show up in fatigues and with weapons “to intimidate us.” She said her information came from other unions who have dealt with Huffmaster.\" -- Read More

Can a Library be a Library Without Books?

Marquette University is building a new library, and it seems that they are leaving out a few things...like books. We have seen this before. An article from the Chicago Tribune discusses the issue at length.\"A great library -- just maybe -- should be a library as libraries have defined themselves for centuries: a place of books, a place to wander and browse and look, to pull volumes off shelves, to feel the texture of pages . . . a place to lose yourself in the magical feeling of it all. A computer, even when it is warmed up, is cold; a library, even on a sub-freezing night, is warm.\" -- Read More

Napster Shut Down

Napster went to court today in CA and lost. My guess is that will be the end of Napster as users switch to the alternatives that will not be shut down because they have no central servers. (Hotline OR Gnuetella OR scour.net, OR etc...)
ZDNet has a nice round up, and as always Slashdot covers it well.

The real scoop on Cuban Libraries

Rory Litwin writes \"The Cuban Libraries Support Group has released a new report that effectively debunks those claims by \"Friends of Cuban Libraries,\" Robert Kent and Jorge Sanguinetty\'s propaganda project, of repression of \"independent librarians.\" The libraries in question are clearly not libraries but personal collections of typically 80 books or so, and the librarians are not librarians at all but have a variety of occupations. They are simply political dissidents whom \"Friends of Cuban Libraries\" is masquerading as librarians to generate sympathy. That they have duped IFLA\'s FAIFE and Amnesty International should not give them any credence; they are propagandists, pure and simple, and they are abusing the our own society\'s good feelings toward librarians. \"

What Librarians Really Say to Patrons

Ever wonder what librarians think when they see patrons every day, every minute...things like...Leave me alone, can\'t you see I am trying to read the new Harry Potter book?Books are not my life. I have a life and it does not involve you. -- Read More

Weird library reference questions

Bob Cox finds some fine sites!
Weird
library reference questions

Actual reference queries reported by American and
Canadian library reference desk workers of various
levels. All of these situations are real and some of them
were mighty embarrassing. Enjoy!

My
favorite:\"Is the basement upstairs?\"

Scientists Spot Net\'s Achilles Heel

Internet Week has a cool Story on how weak the internet may be. The trouble lies in relying on a couple large nodes that handle a significant amount of the traffic. The web isn\'t as webbed as we thought.

\"``The reason this is so is because there are a couple of very big nodes and all messages are going through them. But if someone maliciously takes down the biggest nodes you can harm the system in incredible ways. You can very easily destroy the function of the Internet,\'\' Albert-Lazlo Barabasi, a structural physicist, said in a telephone interview. \" -- Read More

A lesson learned

According to this article from the Union Tribune, a few girls found out what happens when you type in the word \"Shaft\" on an unfiltered Internet terminal.\"They typed in a few key words and waited for information about the movie to come up. Instead, they ended up at a pornographic web site.\" -- Read More

Library of Congress Report

Dadop writes \"The NRC just released a report about LC\'s use of IT and the future. It also includes discussion of copyright issues and the US Copyright Office.\"


This is quite a report on LC, celebrating its 200th anniversary this year. They have more than 9 million books, 11 million films and photos and more than 53 million manuscripts. They also put over a million largely historical things - like the papers of Presidents Washington and Lincoln - on the Web.

\"If the Library of Congress does not make significant progress, it will become a book museum that houses a collection of priceless materials, and the energy of cultural exploration and discovery will fade from its halls and go elsewhere,\" said committee chair James O\'Donnell\" -- Read More

Collection agency helps library

A few months ago we ran a story about the Bethlehem PA Area Public Library that tried out a collection agency to collect on overdue materials and fine collections. Well, McCall.com has a follow up Story on how successful this has been.
Unique Management Services has brought in just under $2,000 for the library during the three months.

\"Unique Management Services, which specializes in library work with a soft touch rather than strong-arm approach, has increased returns and fine payments during its 90-day free trial period, said library administrator Mary Kupferschmid.\" -- Read More

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