GLF pro or con

It seems the generous GLF (Gates
Library Foundation) is a bother to some folks.
ewtn.com has a story that is
very critical of The GLF and
its\' policy of funding certain organizations.

The seattletimes
has a story that says the critisim is overblown, and they don\'t
understand the attacks.

I\'ve also collected a few other stories to throw in for a
"Mini Quickie" on the GLF. Read on for more... -- Read More

New words (and a few odd ones too) in the new dictionary

This article from the Columbus Dispatch describes a few new words and phrases that will appear in a revision of the Random House Webster\'s College Dictionary. Included are \"Arm Candy\", \"Eye Candy\", \"Senior Moment\", and \"DWB\" (Driving While Black)\"DWB (driving while black) was added as a reference to racial profiling. The term is used sarcastically to describe the reason why police have stopped black motorists. Merriam-Webster added big time (something done on a large scale) this year. ATV (all-terrain vehicle) and smoothie (a creamy drink) also were added.\" -- Read More

New Library Website

Apparently, this new web site called The Library Place was debuted at ALA this year, but there has been no talk about it anywhere. It seems pretty raw. Anyway, the site has teamed up with Alibris to offer hard to find books for libraries, according to this article from Excite

People Kicked Out of Library for Sleeping

The Detroit Free Press has this article about new loitering polices in a library in Michigan. They are kicking out homeless people who are sleeping. I wonder if they would do the same to a college student who fell asleep studying for exams? The ACLU may get involved.\"After a crescendo of complaints, the city has posted advertisements to hire a part-time monitor, who will get up to $10 an hour to circle stacks and call police when patrons break library rules.\" -- Read More

Childrens Trivia Quiz

Bruce Flanders wrote:
Just for the fun of it, here\'s a trivia quiz for you. They
aren\'t too tough, but see how many you can get. This is reproduced from our
library staff newsletter, and was created by the newsletter\'s editor Maria
Butler.

\"The following are first lines from classic children\'s books. See how many
you can identify, by title and author. -- Read More

New poet laureate of the United States

the Library of Congress announced Monday, Stanley Kunitz, 95, will become the 10th poet laureate of the United States in the fall. He was quoted as saying he will accept only if they don\'t make him move to D.C.

\"The reason I decided to accept this honor is that I want to do something for the young in this country,\" he said in a statement. \"I also want to stress the diversity of poetry in this country, in this `nation of nations,\' as (Walt) Whitman said.\"

Strike Continues in Ohio

Things have gotten pretty ugly in Canton, Ohio. So ugly that the Canton Reporter carried four articles today about the library strike. Here is one about the library suspending services (including some renovation). Here is another about a library patron accusing a guard of harrassment. And yet another about the leaking of negotiation information to the public. Meanwhile, the other branches are not feeling the effects.

Why do censorship halfway?

This editorial from the News Observer, regarding the partial censorship of reading materials in prisions is filled with sarcastic overtones.\"We\'d probably want to clear the shelves of most news magazines. Definitely The N&O and its competitors. And what about all these Harry Potter books that have the kids all jazzed? Must be dangerous. And I hear they are satanical. Oh and the Bill of Rights, that radical ol\' rag. Wouldn\'t want that to make the rounds.\" -- Read More

Out with the old in NSW

Rob Brian sent this in from The Sydney Morning Herald The library of the NSW Parliament is getting rid of more than half of its old and rare book collection. They need to sell some, to pay for cataloging what they keep. Sales so far have brought in $110,000, enough to employ staff to continue cataloguing the remaining finds. The ex-parliamentary librarian Mr Russell Cope, had wanted the collection kept intact.

\"The fact that parts of [library] holdings are not \'used\' is advanced, especially by uninformed parliamentarians, as an argument for getting rid of \'unused\' items. If they happen to be valuable as well, the monetary attraction becomes hard to resist.\" -- Read More

E-Book 2000

E-Book 2000: September 25-27, Washington DC
To learn about E-books -- how the technology is developing, the
applications that are emerging, and the impact of e-books on libraries --
plan to attend E-Book 2000 on September 25-27, at the Ronald Reagan Building
and International Trade Center in Washington, DC. -- Read More

The Mystery and the Act

Originally published in Library Juice, this article by Teri Weesner has found its way to the Progressive Librarian web site. The article is called \"The Mystery and the Act: Toward a YA Human Sexuality Collection\" and it discusses the needs that teens have for accurate, honest information about sex and sexuality, and how librarians can meet that need.


\"This editorial is based on the premise that there is a connection between young people accessing porn via the internet and their innate curiosity about human sexuality and their own bodies. Young people viewing internet porn have an information need that can be addressed by youth services librarians and library collections. To ignore this information need is just as inaccurate and inappropriate as young people gleaning their information from internet pornography and cybersex chat. Young people\'s information needs are legitimate and the response of shaming from librarians is an ineffective tool for teaching, learning or discipline.\" -- Read More

Harry Potter Quickies

What can you say about a boy named Harry?


I have collected quite a few unused Harry Potter stories, so I thought I\'d just throw them all together in one big fun to read quickies collection. Read on for all sorts of exciting Harry Potter News. -- Read More

Strike on!

Someone sent in This Story at cantonrep.com. The strike we\'ve been reporting on for a week or two has begun at The Stark County District Library. This is the first time workers have struck in Stark County. Some branches are open still, and they are trying to keep services going. Not wanting to take a side, I\'ll just leave out the usual story quote. A member of the Stark County District Library board of trustees has resigned to protest the way he said the board is handling a looming strike by library employees [Other Story]

Stay of Execution

In case you haven\'t heard by now, Napster was not shut down on Friday. If you\'d like to learn more on this subject, O\'Reillynet.com has a Story that compare all the latest and greatest P2P software. This is technology that is changing how people share information, and is worth keeping up on.

\"In essence, Gnutella and Freenet represent a new step in distributed information systems. Each is a system for searching for information; each returns information without telling you where it came from. They are innovative in the areas of distributed information storage, information retrieval, and network architecture. But they differ significantly in both goals and implementation\" -- Read More

Is Prosecution Warranted?

The new trend in libraries is to have the police issue warrants and arrests for overdue meterials. The Los Angeles Times has an article on a few libraries that do not (and will not) do that.\"One of the hallmarks of our library is it is free and open,\" said Susan Kent, the city\'s head librarian. \"Yes, there are really bad offenders, but we\'re not here to prosecute. We\'re here to provide a service.\" -- Read More

Random House Goes Digital

The New York Times has this article about Random House publishing books only in digital format.\"Beginning in January, the house will publish under the name AtRandom a list of about 20 purely digital books, by authors ranging from the editor of Harper\'s magazine to a downtown dominatrix.\" -- Read More

Library is too small...lets go to the brewery

According to this article in the Star Tribune, a library which can only hold 40 people at a time may take over the hospitality loungue of an old brewery complex.\"Imagine showing up at your public library and being told you can\'t go in. That happens sometimes at the Pierre Bottineau branch library in northeast Minneapolis. It\'s the city\'s smallest library. -- Read More

The Librarian Interview

When I first got my MLS and sent out tons of resumes, I only got a few interviews. I once was told I came across as shy, that I was not assertive, and I needed to be more agressive.So here is what I said at interviews...Perhaps all of the librarians out there could give me some interview pointers. The D is for the library director\'s questions...Director:
Why do you want to work here?I heard you have a nice book collection.D: Who is Harry Potter?The library\'s gardener. -- Read More

\"Books Librarians Need to Write\"

For all of you inspiring writers out there, here are some books that could get us on Oprah\'s recommended book list. Who moved the card catalog and gave me a PC?-an amazing look at changeThe case of the missing book cards-An unsolved mystery -- Read More

XML for bibliographic data

Following several inquiries from the for-profit sector, Lane Medical
Library has decided to make it\'s XMLMARC software available without charge
for commercial use. Availability will be governed by the the Free Software
Foundation\'s GNU General Public License, version 2 (June 1991) or later at
the user\'s option. The new agreement governing all new licensees is
effective today, July 28, 2000, and is posted on our web site:
xmlmarc.stanford.edu -- Read More

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