Librarians are disappearing

The Boston Globe has this article on the continuing trend of disappearing librarians.\"Colleges and universities are turning out as many professional librarians as ever - 4,577 in 1998 - but many quickly vanish, leaving libraries understaffed or operated by employees with less training.\" -- Read More

Robust Hyperlinks and Locations

DLib.org has a
very interesting and technical Story on a new form of hyperlinking that
uses \"permissive, but robust\" linking structure, rather
than the current way of linking. Neat stuff, that could
make 404\'s a little less common.

\"robustness is
achieved by providing multiple, independent
descriptions across boundaries where change is likely
to be uncoordinated. If the different descriptions are
property selected, then most uncoordinated changes
will be unlikely to cause all the descriptions to fail. \" -- Read More

Net ranking numbers don\'t tell whole story

CNET has a very Interesting Story on those net ranking we all read so much about. I\'ve always questions many of these ratings, especially Statmarket, which seems to have a very biased sample. If you ever read the rankings, check out This Story

Experts blame the problem in part on the fact that there are several large ranking companies, primarily Media Metrix and Nielsen/NetRatings, and each company calculates rankings differently. For other media, one large ranking company provides undisputed data: Nielsen for television, Arbitron for radio and the Audit Bureau of Circulation for many print publications. -- Read More

Stephen King bypasses publisher for online

ZDNet story:

Horror author Stephen King says he and his readers could become \"Big Publishing\'s worst nightmare\" and help \"midlist writers\" by downloading a new novel from his Web site at a cost of $1 an installment. -- Read More

Excuse me sir, what are you doing?

According to this article from the Sun Herald, as man was seen masturbating to porn at a library Internet terminal by 2 young girls.\"\'\'This incident has implications far beyond Jefferson Parish. There is a computer connected to the Internet in almost every library in the country now. As far as we\'re concerned, this is going to force us to make a lot of decisions on policy,\'\' Joan Adams, the library director, said. -- Read More

Run down on the COPA Commission

Jamie over at Slashdot continues to be one of the greatest sources of information on filtering facts with His Latest Report on the COPPA Commission meeting. They give interesting info on BAIR and ClickSafe, as well as a good report on the meeting.

\"In a nutshell, I\'m not sure what, if anything, was established at this meeting. It\'s clear that most of the Commissioners knew every little to start off with, and their opinions are being formed on what amounts to a series of sales pitch sprinkled with god-and-country references, a la mega blowout carpet sales around Independence Day. I\'m glad COPA was struck down. Let\'s get on with our lives.

Interview with David Weinberger

CIO.com has a nice Interview with David Weinberger (The Cluetrain Manifesto). He talks about issues like how the internet is affecting traditional business structures, manageing information resources, and his \"hyperlinked organizations\"

Weinberger\'s epiphany in \"The Hyperlinked Organization\" chapter of The Cluetrain Manifesto is simple: Businesses don\'t consist of slots on an org chart or entries in a database. Businesses are made up of people. And people define and organize the business by continually discussing, literally and metaphorically, what their company is really all about -- Read More

Potter Books Realize Fantasy for Librarians

The LATimes has an interesting Story on what Harry Means to librarians. Libraries around the country have been buying record numbers of the newest potter book, and it seems some librarians like what Harry is doing for the children.

\"They are using reading as a way of exciting their imaginations,\" said Lori Karns, support services manager for the Ventura County Public Library. \"They\'re having to work to make meaningful pictures, whereas TV just feeds it to them. And the language itself in Harry Potter is lots of fun.\" -- Read More

Friday Updates

This weeks friday updates include a library arson, bad library boards, cooperation, a bit more on Mr. Potter, good circulation stats, library stikes, heartfelt donations, Carnegie libraries, more filtering articles, the out-of-control book sale, the under-the-sea library, and much, much more....plus the Quote of the Week -- Read More

Friday Funnies

The other day, I witnessed a mother sitting next to one of our Internet terminals breastfeeding her infant. At first, I was stunned, probably because I have only seen this performed once, but another thought entered my mind at this odd moment: Is this woman in violation of our “anti-naked” Internet policies? This led me to think that she should be breastfeeding her kid in the stacks, preferably in the section on breastfeeding (should she have any questions or problems, she could just pick up a book).Remembering last weeks essay about chat rooms in libraries, I then had one of my rare strokes of genius. The library can be used as a dating service... -- Read More

Online Public Library Reference Services

Thinking about doing online reference? Someone
suggested a link to this Handy resource regarding online refrence. It\'s
a good read for all those considering making this
move. I\'ve seen some discussion on the lists on this
topic, so I think some folks are making the
move.

\"A hundred years ago, the only way to tap
into the expertise of a reference librarian was to
physically travel down to the library. In the past fifty
years, information seekers have had the choice of
visiting the library physically, or placing a phone call to
the reference desk. Today, a few pioneering library
systems are delivering reference service right to the
patron\'s home computer - - -via online communication.
\"

J.K. Rowling to play the Skydome

J.K. Rowling (what books has she written again?) is booked to have a reading at the Skydome (seats 60,000) on October 14th. 60,000 screaming children for an author, I love it!! Canoe.ca has the story.\"We really don\'t know how many people are going to come,\" confessed Greg Gatenby, the festival\'s effusive artistic director. \"So we thought rather than book a smaller space and have either a riot or tens of thousands of disappointed fans.\" -- Read More

library is wrong to play the role of Internet censor

Here\'s an interesting editorial from The Concord Monitor that comes out against filtering, saying that librarians should keep the control and not give it to \"computer-filtering software is as dumb as a post\".

\"As for pornography, library selection committees generally considered whether there was literary or social value to a particular publication. But the fact was that no library could put every book or every video or every magazine in its stacks, so judgments had to be made.
\" -- Read More

Syringe used in attack held water

The saga continues...The syringe that was used in the attack on a student in a library in Ohio contained water. The attacker is a member of the Air National Guard where immunization shots were being done. This story is from the Columbus Dispatch\"We have tight controls on the use and disposal of syringes,\'\' said Capt. Denise Varner, spokeswoman for the 121st Air Refueling Wing.\" -- Read More

How do your stalls rate?

R Hadden Writes :


It is always interesting when libraries make the Wall Street Journal, but recently the bathroom of one library got a special mention. You can learn more about the Phoenix Public Library at: www.ci.phoenix.az.us/library.html, but alas! There is no photograph of the colorful and delightful bathroom.
\"What a Way to Go: Architects Get Lavish Designing Public Lavatories --- With Liquid-Crystal Glass Doors And Waterfalls, the WC Gets New Meaning: Wicked Cool\" Wall Street Journal;Jul 19, 2000; By Motoko Rich;
\"Don\'t miss the public restrooms!\" Feedback, a travel guide for artists, designers and architects, declares about the main library in downtown Phoenix. The entryways to the lavatories are partitions made of translucent glass that change color every five seconds as tiny fiber-optic wires emit sparks of light...\"

Can 35 million book buyers be wrong?

Harold Bloom at The National Post has written a sharply critical Story that has nothing good to say about the series, or the fans.

\"I will keep in mind that a host are reading it who simply will not read superior fare, such as Kenneth Grahame\'s The Wind in the Willows or the Alice books of Lewis Carroll. Is it better that they read Rowling than not read at all? Will they advance from Rowling to more difficult pleasures?\" -- Read More

Who Killed Copywright

Macedition has an interesting Editorial on the changing role of copywright. He argues that copywright is already dead, and says it wasn\'t killed by the internet, but by the motion picture industry, the recording industry and the major publishers. Also check out this Interview with the Head of the RIAA.

\"In the past century, though, the wealthy and powerful have been lobbying long and hard through international consortiums such as WIPO to shift the balance of power back to the publisher. \" -- Read More

Libraries offer kids a 4th R

This \'R\' rated video thing has been floating aroun for a while now, The Denver Post has an Editorial that tried to make the point this is a bad idea.

\"Movie theaters at least try to keep children from seeing R-rated movies, and Blockbuster says it won\'t rent those movies to kids. But armed with a library card, Colorado children can check out Rrated movies for free.\"

Here is the line that caught my eye:\"No one in Denver, Douglas County or Jefferson County has complained to the local libraries...\" -- Read More

Stephen King wants your dollar

Stephen King will start posting parts of his story, \"The Plant\" on his web site on Monday, but if less than 75% of his readers don\'t pay him a dollar, it will not continue. Newsday has the article.\"Although King has yet to spell out how readers will pay for his prose, it\'s expected that the U.S. Postal .Service will be carrying thousands of envelopes with dollars or dollar checks in them starting Monday.\" -- Read More

The wonderfuld world of pop-ups

Bob Cox has sent in many a link over these past few
months, but this has got to be the coolest. North TX U
Library
has an online display of Pop-Up and
Moveable books.
Check out the website
, the images move, just like
the
books. They go back as far as 1811, many fine
examples.

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