Tool Kit for the Expert Web Searcher

Pat Ensor
writes \"Prominent LITA leader Pat Ensor has
developed a succinct, streamlined guide to the best
tools to use for searching for information on the World
Wide Web. Ensor, chair of the Library and Information
Technology Association\'s Top Technology Trends
Committee, developed this tool kit after finding that
there are very few places on the Web to find constantly
updated recommendations about which search
engines, subject guides, and other resources are most
effective in producing fast, relevant, and authoritative
results for information-seekers. The Tool Kit for
the Expert Web Searcher can be accessed at l
ita.org
\"

Czechs Try to Ban Hitler\'s Book

Book Wire has this article about the forced pulling of Mein Kampf from bookstores in the Czech Republic. Will the libraries be next?\"Bookshops throughout the Czech Republic have been raided by police confiscating copies of a new edition of Mein Kampf that has become one of the best-selling books in the country in a decade.\" -- Read More

Another Heart Warming Story

SF Gate had this article about a fire that damaged parts of a school, and the residents of the community that built it back up.
\"Three years ago, a fire ripped through the school, severely damaging a wing of classrooms and its library, destroying every book on every shelf. But thanks to much- needed donations from Peninsula schools and residents -- including one who took the school\'s principal Lorna Manning on a $2,200 book shopping spree -- the shelves in the soon-to-be re-opened library are beginning to fill up.\" -- Read More

Concern over small libraries is circulating

This article from Morning Call discusses what small libraries are doing if they can\'t afford to compete technologically with other libraries...and the concern that goes along with it.
\"Many of these community libraries are waiting to see if finding their niche -- tailoring a collection to users\' tastes and remembering each person by name -- will be enough to survive. It\'s a growing concern as educational products become increasingly digital and networked, arguably removing the need for publishers and libraries.\" -- Read More

Friday Updates

This Friday brings us Horror from The King, Warm Fuzzies from Oregon, and Naming Rights in Chicago.
Next week I am hoping to run a story on expanding, or building new libraries. I run across more than a few stories a week on library \"buildings\" and expansions. If you\'re expanding (so to speak), let me know. -- Read More

Library Cat Shaved

Herald.com in Sunny FL, has a Story that just strikes me as funny. The first line of the story is \"Will the real Slim Shearer please stand up?\", and it gets better. The Library Cat, also known as Legs because of his extraordinarily long limbs, suffered a humiliating razor attack. Someone shaved the words ``Seniors 2000\'\' on the back of the cat. Two seniors were given a long lecture on pranks and respect for animals, after they were turned in. It gets funnier... -- Read More

Still Searching? Ask a Human

Wired has a Story on how sites are now offering human search help. You just click on a button and a helpful \"expert\" calls you up and answers your question. MSN is the newest one to jump on the bandwagon, with Abuzz.com, Askanexpert.com, Expertcentral.com, Knowpost.com, and Xpertsite.com, and others.

\"People sometimes can\'t find what they\'re looking for and need somewhere to get help,\" said Danny Sullivan, publisher of Search Engine Watch, in a previous interview.\"A shocking quote! What\'s really cool is as an expert working for keen.com (The company with all the experts) you can make as much as $1,000 a week selling your expert info. How much do you make behind the reference desk? -- Read More

Library Makes Big E-Book Move

Now Here\'s a library I can respect. Florida Gulf Coast University is buying 500 E-Books this fall for the students. Students will be able to access electronic books through the university’s OPAC.

\"Bryant Hinson, director of library programs for netLibrary, said the advantage of eBooks is access.

“Anymore, kids are more apt to go to an electronic version than a print version. Also, electronic books can’t be stolen, pages can’t be ripped out and they don’t need a spot on a shelf,” he said.\"

I just love to see librarians making bold moves like this. -- Read More

Volunteer-run library source of pride in Thornhil

Marva Chung writes : The June 10,2000 issue of the
Globe and Mail (page A23)reports the following
story, titled, \"Volunteer-run library source of pride in
Thornhill\"

The Vaughan Library Board ordered the Gallanough
Library closed becasue a
large library was built in the neighbourhood, however,
the residents fought
to keep it open. The Gallanough Resource Centre (it
can\'t be called a
library), is now up and running thanks to the residents
and a wealthy
resident who bequeathed the building to be used as a
library. It is now a
privately run charitable organization with 75 volunteers
and one part-time
employee. Memberships cost $10.00 per family and
$5.00 for singles.

This reminds us of the adage \"the more things change
the more they stay the
same\" -- libraries being operated on members\'
subscriptions.

The Library as the Latest Web Venture

The NY
Times
has an interesting Article on the new effort to
build an electronic library so as to pass along the
power of electronic searching.

\"\"I hate the library,
so I try to avoid it,\" Carrie Larkworthy said. \"It\'s such a
big facility that you have to search through.\"

She\'s a student at Harvard University. How\'s that
for a scary quote? -- Read More

Rejected Book Gives Library a headache

This is an interesting story from the Toledo Blade. A library rejected a donation of a biography of Martha Sanger (an abortion-rights activist) that it saw to be \"badly written...comes across as a polemic, not a biography\". Four years later, the donator is crying censorship.
\"Ironically, the author of the book, Dr. George Grant, sees nothing wrong with the library\'s decision to not carry his book. \"Institutions are full of agendas. Libraries are run by humans, so they will always reflect a particular bent,\" Dr. Grant said. -- Read More

Librarians protest to demand equal pay

The Bergen Record has this article about the staff at one library who are picketing in demand of salary increases.
\"We\'ve had several patrons say they never thought they would see librarians picketing,\" said Jane Tarantino, the children\'s librarian. \"It\'s keeping people aware that the situation hasn\'t been resolved. The librarians should be paid their worth.\" -- Read More

Intellectual rights may be Net casualty

The National Post up in Canada has a rather interesting Story on the death of intellectual property. They touch on music and words, and how things are changing because of the web.

\"In the case of the written word, book writers can make livings, even fortunes, because the market is global and literacy is higher than ever in history. \" -- Read More

Holy MP3

You can now download an MP3 version of The Bible online. You can get it at Audiotreasure.com.

Wired has an Interview with the guy who did it.

UCSD\'s BURN server shut down

Rory Litwin
writes \"After seven years online, the UCSD
Communication department chair Carol
Padden has censored the project hosted at
burn.ucsd.edu. She has made
her decision against the wishes of the majority of
department faculty
and graduate students and without consulting or even
informing any of
the department faculty or students involved with the
project, reportedly
under pressures from the UC president Richard
Atkinson. No explanation
or justification for the shutdown was given, nor was any
opportunity
for a hearing or reconsideration of the decision. Host
records were
simultaneously removed from campus DNS servers,
rendering burn.ucsd.edu
nonexistent. Only a few hours advance warning was
given to BURN! project
representatives, leaving them no way to even contact
most system users
to inform them of what had happened or to arrange for
moving to another
address.


http://libr.org/Juice/issues/vol3/LJ_3.23.html#15

\"

Uneasey over E-books

The Chicago Tribune has this rather intresting article about the future of e-books. Eric Goss, the group product manager for amazon.com, has his own opinion on the matter.\"This is great technology,\" Goss said, holding higher not the e-book device, but the plain, old, ordinary paperback. \"Nothing has come along to supersede the printed book in 400 years. Right now, this is a superior technology.\" -- Read More

24 Hour Public Libraries

Brian writes \"Here\'s one of the most insulting and sad things I\'ve read in a while. An economist is quoted in a Chicago Tribune column on the need for a \"family-friendly economy\" as saying:

\"If a 7-Eleven can be open 24 hours, why not a public library?\"

Check out
chicagotribune.com for the complete story. I did read it, and I don\'t quite understand why having 24 hour libraries equals family friendly living. Certainly not friendly for the librarians families!

Library Checkout Policy Irritates Parent

SF Gate has a great Story for the image obsessed librarian. A woman says she wanted to know what books her daughter had out so she could return them on time, and the librarian got \"huffy\" with her.

\"``We\'re talking about children here,\'\' said Shurtleff. ``And the librarians were so huffy with me, like they were really looking out for my daughter. It made me feel really defensive.\'\' -- Read More

Limits on books in prison upheld

The Milwaukee Journal Sentinal published this article about the amount of books that inmates in segregation are allowed to have with them at one time. The inmates said that the rule (which said that they can only have three) violated their first amendment rights. They won the case, but the appeals court disagreed, and it was over-ruled.
\"The center\'s inmates, who are segregated for violating prison disciplinary rules, can only have three state-issued paperback books in addition to their own religious book, such as a Bible or Qur\'an.\" -- Read More

Judge OKs smaller board for library

The Post-gazette has a follow up Story on that trouble at the Andrew Carnegie Free Library.

\"Yesterday, Common Pleas Judge Walter R. Little granted a motion reducing the size of the board of trustees of the Andrew Carnegie Free Library from 17 to 12 members and eliminating the position of lifetime trustee.\" -- Read More

Syndicate content Syndicate content