1,000 Years at British Library

The AP Wire is carrying this story;

A 1,000-year-old book of riddles, a 15th-century love letter and a 20th-century bear named Pooh: All are strands in the rich history of English literature being celebrated this summer by the British Library.

This body of literature is ``the thing, above anything else, that Britain has given to the world in the course of the last millennium,\'\' government arts secretary Chris Smith says about the national library\'s major exhibit for the year 2000. -- Read More

Can hyperlinks be outlawed?

This Story from Salon.com is raising a terrifying possiblity.

\"Can hyperlinks be outlawed? Only last week, a California judge ruled, in a case brought by Ticketmaster against Tickets.com, that it\'s not illegal for one site to link to another. Among other things, that suit concerned \"deep linking.\" Ticketmaster alleged that by bypassing its home page and linking directly to \"inside\" pages, Tickets.com violated its copyright. The judge, however, held that \"hyperlinking does not in itself involve a violation of the Copyright Act.\" -- Read More

Activist wants Net filtered at library

Read this Story from the San Antonio Express-News.

For almost a year, longtime East Side activist Otis
Thompson has led a small-scale crusade to prevent
Internet access to pornography at city libraries.

Last month, bench advertisements popped up at various East Side bus stops, including one in front of the San Antonio Public Library\'s Carver branch.

Their message: \"Stamp out pornography at Carver Library.\"

\"We\'ve fought against gangs, alcohol and cigarettes,\"
Thompson said. \"Now we\'re faced with fighting pornography.\"

Library Net filters OK\'d

Read this Story from the Colorado Springs Gazette.

Libraries would receive financial incentives to ban \"obscene or illegal\" Internet sites from public computers under a bill given preliminary approval Wednesday by the state
Senate.

Senate Bill 85 was endorsed despite strong opposition from Colorado Springs-area lawmakers, who thought the bill didn\'t go far enough to prevent pornography on public library
computers.

If passed today, the bill would go to the House for consideration.

Clinton library suit hits court today

Check out this Story for the latest in the construction of the Clinton Presidential Library. From the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette.

The lawsuit keeping Little Rock from acquiring all the land it needs for the Clinton presidential library will be heard for the first time today when City Attorney Tom Carpenter and landowner Eugene Pfeifer III appear in Chancery Court. -- Read More

British Library acquires archive beyond compare

The Gaurdian in the UK has this story on the vast archive of the actor and director Laurence Olivier.

\"The British Library has acquired the vast archive of the actor and director Laurence Olivier, it announced yesterday.
The avalanche of paper reveals a man who knew he was marked for greatness and began to hoard evidence for his life history from his early teenage years.\" -- Read More

Soon, you can update e-mails on the fly

ZDNet has a rather interesting story on a cool new email trick.

\"FireDrop is unveiling a new e-mail service that will let you update your message -- even after it was sent.\"Today\'s e-mail is dead on arrival,\" said FireDrop co-founder Brian Axe. \"It\'s current when it\'s sent, but not when it\'s read. We want to change that.\"

The system, called Zaplets, incorporates programming hooks that request updated information from FireDrop\'s central server once a user opens his or her e-mail. The information requests make it possible for the reader to see the original message, along with all the replies to that message, in a single screen. \" -- Read More

Harry\'s doing what?

Someone suggested this story from the Australian Paper The Age

\"J.K. Rowling, discussing the next instalment in her bestselling Harry Potter series, said last week that sex is about to enter her young hero\'s life. \"He\'s 14 now and has started to realise that girls are quite interesting. I tend to think that if someone is sufficiently engaged in one of the books, he\'s not going to be too disappointed if, at some point, his hero holds hands with a little girl.\" -- Read More

Web-based Research Tutorial.

Debbie Cardinal writes:Librarians from the UW campuses have completed a web-based Research Tutorial. You can check it out at
www.wils.wisc.edu/tutorial.


The working group, appointed by library directors at University of
Wisconsin campus libraries, began their work in March 1999.
Their charge, defined by members of the Council of Wisconsin
Libraries Distance Education Committee, was to develop a web-
based tutorial intended for new users of university-level libraries.
These freshmen, sophomores or returning adults would be
taking one or more courses at a distance. The tutorial is intended
to provide library research assistance to students who do not
have easy and immediate access to traditional bibliographic
instruction. -- Read More

Task Force To Create E-book Standards

Publishers Weekly reports that The Association of American Publishers\' has developed an \"action plan\" with regard to e-books that could be implemented by an association task force. The memberships goal in backing the study was to help the publishing industry \"seize the initiative\" in dealing with the fledgling e-book market, thereby preventing an outside entity from imposing its own standards on publishers.


Has the ALA started something like this? DO we as librarians need something like this? Are libraries ready for this future? -- Read More

Programming languages covered by First Amendment

News.com is reporting on an interesting court ruling in CA.

\"A federal appeals court today cleared the way for a law professor to post previously banned encryption software on the Internet, finding that computer code qualifies as speech protected by the First Amendment.

The decision hands the U.S. government yet another defeat in its efforts to keep intact federal rules limiting the export of encryption software. Academics and civil liberties groups have mounted several attacks on the regulations, winning a similar result before an appeals court in California, a decision currently under review.\" -- Read More

First Amendment lawyers take on DVD cracking case

Cnet is reporting on legal moves in the DeCSS battle.

\"Free speech lawyers have appealed a preliminary injunction granted against
72 Web site operators accused of stealing trade secrets by circulating a
program online that lets people crack the security on DVDs.


The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF)
submitted its appeal this week following the January order issued by a
Santa Clara County Superior Court judge in California.

-- Read More

Memorable Canadians

Marcel Larocque writes:\"Memorable Canadians www.nlc-bnc.ca/bioindex is the new Web-based biographical index available through National Library of Canada\'s Web site . You can now search a growing database of over 200 eminent Canadian personalities using any of four efficient indexes: name, subject, endeavour and electronic resource. Memorable Canadians provides quick and direct access to biographical information on important Canadians who have contributed to the Canadian cultural landscape. If you are looking for Canadian biography, start here!\" -- Read More

Online Bookstore Targets Librarians

A new company focused on meeting the needs of librarians at the nation\'s colleges and universities for used, rare, out-of-print and antiquarian books, is opening up for business at 21northmain.com. The site includes the inventories of more than 2,500 used-book dealers nationwide, for a total online inventory of more than 10 million titles.

Check out 21northmain.com. -- Read More

America\'s most popular poem

Two years ago, poet laureate Robert Pinsky launched a campaign to discover American\'s favorite poem. He received nearly 18,000 written, videotaped and recorded suggestions, and has found the most popular one -- Robert Frost\'s \"The Road Not Taken.\"

Pinsky presented some of the results from his project Monday to the Library of Congress for its archives: 100 video and audio recordings of Americans from all walks of life reading their favorite verses. -- Read More

Read up on Microsoft

Unless you\'ve been on Mars, you know that the U.S. District Court Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson says that Microsoft is doing \"violence\" to the competitive process. He has ruled Microsoft \"maintained its monopoly power by anti-competitive means and attempted to monopolize the Web browser market\". You can read the entire ruling At the usdoj.gov. The best story I found was from Jon Katz at Slashdot. He takes a rather interesting outlook on Microsoft and the place it holds on the industry.

\"The Microsoft Age began to unravel when programmers all over the earth connected and demonstrated that they could create a viable, ethical alternative operating system, sharing freely what was costing everybody else billions. It was accelerated by Bill Gates\' profound and distinctly non-visionary arrogance.\"Read on for a few more stories that may be of interest. -- Read More

Rewriting the book on library funding

A special commission here in NY is calling for a rethinking of the way libraries across the state are paid for. New York should contribute far more state funds to local libraries and base the allocation on need, according to the Regents Commission on Library Services, which for the last 18 months has been looking at ways of improving the state\'s vast library system. Read the story at The Times Union, Albany. -- Read More

Future of the net

cnsnews.com has an interview with Vint Cerf he\'s one of the two engineers who invented what has become the Internet. He said the future will see waves of advances in many areas because of the system.

\"

In the not too distant future consumers may receive an email at work from their refrigerator at home letting them know that the orange juice is getting low or the milk is so old it\'s about to walk out on its own - such a concept isn\'t just a television commercial, in fact, Internet-ready refrigerator prototypes are already being tested in some parts of the world said one of the inventors of the computer system that has helped make the world a smaller place.\" -- Read More

Job Search Advice

Library Juice lives
up to its\' usual level of excellence with the Job Search Supplement. An unbeatable
guide to resources and advice on finding a job in the
dog eat dog world of librarians. -- Read More

Battling Censorware

The Standard has a great round up on the battle between Mattel and two hackers, Eddy Jansson of Sweden and Matthew Skala of Canada who wrote CPHack, a program that lets people see a list of the sites that Cyber Patrol blocks. This is a very important case, it has issues in The DMCA, the freedom to link, copyright law, the First Amendment, and other info science interests.

\"The argument rests upon the anticircumvention provision of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act. The DMCA prohibits trafficking in devices whose primary purpose is to circumvent a technology meant to protect copyrighted works. CPHack would constitute such a device; mirroring it, as the law has been interpreted, would constitute a violation of the DMCA. So Mattel could prevail against distributors of CPHack whether or not the program itself was a violation of Mattel\'s copyright.\" -- Read More

Syndicate content Syndicate content