Architecture Anarchy and How to Survive It

Enterprise Systems Journal has an interesting Article on Data Warehousing. They examine the alternative architectures available, some of the market forces that are shaping the current and future BI architecture environment, and factors to consider when choosing your architectural path. -- Read More

Judge rules two library books are child pornography

The Union Tribune ,in San Diego, is Reporting Judge William Kennedy, at the conclusion of a one-day, nonjury trial, ruled that the photographs depicting naked young girls in provocative poses constituted child pornography. Bruce Johnson, the arts, music and recreation supervisor at the library, said police at times have requested to see the slips to determine who is viewing books of this genre, but the library has always refused to share the information.

\"It\'s a private transaction,\" he said. -- Read More

LOC to not digitize its book collection?

Kip DeGraaf writes \"James Billington, the Librarian of Congress gave a speech to the National Press Club (transcript available at http://www.loc.gov/today/transcripts/041400-npc.html on April 14th about the role of the LOC in the Information Age.

http://www.techlawjournal.com/educ/20000415.htm contains some tidbits from the question and answer session conducted after his address. \"

Privacy and Librarians

Thomas J. Hennen Jr. writes \"The Washington Post talks about the 10th Conference on Computers, Freedom and Privacy saying, \"Neal Stephenson, a revered figure among the techie set for such works as \"Snow Crash\" and \"Cryptonomicon\" – books infused not just with science and technology, but also with wit and insightful social commentary.\" The whole story is at:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A24833-2000Apr6.html

Today\'s technology cover story on Salon.com titled \"The Twilight of the Cryptogeeks\" mentions that \"Librarians everywhere\" were given an EFF Pioneer award.

The message: Privacy? Big Brother? Get over it.

It was a heretical point to make at the conference – known as CFP – which has long been the kind of place where online counterculture, cyber-cops and corporate suits all come together to discuss such issues as encryption, the First Amendment and hacking. Earlier in the day, attendees had heard a presentation by Commissioner Mozelle W. Thompson of the privacy-minded Federal Trade Commission; she spoke after a session entitled \"Privacy Commissioners: Powermongers, Pragmatists or Patsies?\"
The whole story is at:
http://www.salon.com/tech/feature/2000/04/13/libertarians/index.html

datcalmguy

Thomas J. Hennen Jr.
http://www.haplr-index.com
6014 Spring Street
Racine,WI 53406
Voice: 414-886-1625 Fax: 414-886-5424
thennen@haplr-index.com
\"

Expert Soup

Today on Traffick I offer this overview of services dispensing expert advice on the Internet. They now come in many different flavors. I\'m sure this only scratches the surface, so if you have other suggestions, please add a comment. -- Read More

Online Classes and the Library

Newsweek has an Article on the new online programs digital diploma mills and online education in general. Libraries and Librarians need to be aware of the push to go online with classes. Are they sacrificing education in the name of profit?

\"Online schools say the instructional faculty (who have day jobs) are better able to connect with working adult students. But traditionalists say full-time faculty are as essential to a university as its library. To fight the practice, the American Association of University Professors is trying to prevent online colleges from winning accreditation.\" -- Read More

Great time to be a librarian

Thomas J. Hennen Jr. writes:It may be a still be a great time to be a publisher or a librarian, despite all the problems, it seems.

Jason Epstein has a fascinating article that parallels the recent \'Great Time to Be a Librarian\' thread on PubLib (see digests 1233 to 1236 at http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/PubLib/

Epstein\'s article is on the future of the book publishing business and it is titled \'The Rattle of Pebbles.\'It can be found in the New York Review of Books; Volume XLVII, Number 7; Cover Date: April 27, 2000. It is on also the web at:
http://www.nybooks.com/nyrev/index.html
Says Epstein: \"Twenty years ago when my children and their friends came of age I advised them to shun the publishing business. Today I would offer young people, the opposite advice. The transformation that awaits them foreshadows cultural ramifications that can hardly be imagined but that promise a lifetime of creative adventure...\" -- Read More

3M Announces $1 Million for schools

3M, in partnership with the American Association of School Librarians, will donate 3M Detection Systems to up to 100 school library media centers in 2000.
Deadline for applications is May 31, 2000
In an effort to help school libraries maintain their valuable resources, 3M, a leader in library security, announces today the launch of \"3M Salute to Schools,\" a program providing up to $1 million in 3M? Detection Systems to school library media centers in the United States. -- Read More

Search Engines have a long way to go.

I found This Funny Page on Slashdot today.
Someone did an \"Interview\" with the search
engine AskJeeves
asking VERY simple questions, questions any librarian
would be able to answer. The answers are
outstanding. It shows how far computers (And the web)
need to go to replace librarians.

UpdateAsk Jeeves if He\'s Gay! -- Read More

Public libraries learning to promote themselves

The Nando Times has yet another great library Story.This one on how in the past few years, libraries have become more aggressive about promoting themselves.

With publishers ever-nervous about the future of reading, libraries offer a large, dependable market. According to the most recent statistics available from the Book Industry Study Group, public libraries bought close to $700 million worth of books in 1997 and are projected to spend almost $900 million by 2002. And because libraries have a mission to buy books that are useful, and not just popular, they accept titles mainstream stores avoid.

\"Publishers depend on libraries for midlist titles,\" said Marcia Purcell, director of Random House\'s department of library promotion. \"The same is true with first-time novelists. Some bookstores are reluctant to take a chance on a first novel. Libraries are willing.\" -- Read More

Put up or pull out, library tells users

ML Live has a Story on a little fight brewing in Michigan. Residents in one School District pay $1.6 Million a year for library services; their neighbors pay nothing. So managers are demanding all residents pay their fair share or possibly lose access to the library.

\"What we have said to them is, \'Look, we don\'t think this is fair. We would like you to join (our) district library.\' If they decide not to do that, we will terminate our contract.\"Sherry Hupp, Cromaine library director, said of the northern district residents. -- Read More

Bills spur debate on filters in Florida

TCPalm.com has this Story on the bill introduced Monday would require public libraries in Florida to install software filters on at least half of their computers that have Internet access.

More and more children are accessing pornography on the Internet,\" Campbell said. \"More and more sexual predators are using libraries to access our children.\"
[Sen. Skip Campbell, D-Tamarac] -- Read More

Inner City Mother Goose Pulled from Shelf

A Story on how the Whitney Point Central School District (NY) has removed Inner City Mother Goose by Eve Merriam from its middle school library after a parent complained about its language and content.The book, The Inner City Mother Goose by Eve Merriam, updates Mother Goose rhymes to make satirical comments on street violence, housing inadequacies, crime and other problems plaguing inner cities. -- Read More

Happy 200th to the LOC

The Nando Times has a nice look at the Library of Congress, in Washington, D.C.

\"On April 24, 1800, President John Adams approved an appropriation of $5,000 to purchase \"such books as may be necessary for the use of Congress.\"

Books - mostly on history, economics and law - were ordered from London. They arrived in 1801 and were shelved in the new U.S. Capitol. The collection consisted of just 740 volumes and three maps.

Next week, on April 24, millions of books and much history later, the Library of Congress celebrates its 200th anniversary as an institution that grew, in the words of one of its biographers, into \"a symbol of American democracy and faith in the power of learning.\" -- Read More

Encyclopedia Fits Into Palm of Hand

Excite News Has this interesting business-side oriented story on how Encyclopaedia Britannica\'s image has seen a dizzying transformation.

\"The new, gizmo-loving side of the august publisher showed through again Monday with the introduction of a software application that gives users of Palm handheld computers access to all 44 million words of the encyclopedia.

\"Britannica now goes wherever you go,\" said Don Yannias, chief executive officer of Britannica.com Inc., the Chicago encyclopedia publisher\'s digital arm.
\" -- Read More

The Wealth Of Knowledge

CIO.com has a nice review of the book Building Wealth By Lester C. Thurow; a book that seeks to define the rules in a Knowledge-Based Economy.

\"Everyone understands what it means to own land or productive equipment and how those rights can be enforced. It is not so clear, however, what it means to own knowledge or how those ownership rights can be enforced\" -- Read More

Libraries boom despite the Web

Finally a Story that admits the web is not going to shut down libraries.

\"It soon became clear that libraries are far from the tar pit - that, in fact, as both Reid and Keith Lance, director of Library Research Services for the Colorado State Library, noted: This idea so many people have, about libraries declining in the age of the Internet, is just wrong. Libraries, in fact, recognized the competition that technology presented and have offered it themselves. -- Read More

The True Library of the Future?

This Story from Digital Mass puts an interesting spin on a new web site that offers to respond to a typed-in question with an answer and an attributed source, usually in as little as a tenth of a second. The Web site is Factcity.com and if they do indeed pull this off, could put a few Reference Librarians out of work. Check it out and let us know what you think. -- Read More

Drew Carey to Compete for $1 Million for Ohio Libraries

I can\'t pass up the opportunity to post a story that Involves Who Wants to Be a Millionare? and Drew Carey!

Carey, who launched his career in 1986 at the Cleveland Comedy Club, has chosen Ohio libraries to receive proceeds from his celebrity appearance on ABC\'s popular television show, Who Wants to be a Millionaire.

Carey will appear on the Millionaire program on May 2 and 3 in a special game show featuring celebrities who will be playing for their favorite charities and causes. Carey has chosen Ohio libraries as recipient of his winnings during \"Celebrity Week\" on the program.

Is he smart enough to win a Million? -- Read More

Internet displacing traditional media

Freedom Forum has a great Story From the prophetic Jon Katz on how quick people have turned to the web for news.

\"The Chicago-based group, a consortium of 3,000 university professors who consult on high-tech startups, found in a nationwide phone survey that the Net has replaced television and newspapers as the top source of key information for young adults, 67% of whom are already online.

In the survey of 1,014 households, nearly 70% of Americans aged 14 to 24 live in households that use the Net to gather important information, compared to a nationwide average of just 46%.\" -- Read More

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