New library has only a handful of books

The Miami Herald reports on the lack of books at a local library.


A new library has been built at Carol City Elementary after three years of construction. But it is missing one important component: books.

The Carol City Elementary School Parent Teacher Association said in a press release that bookshelves at the new library ``stand 80 to 90 percent empty.\'\'

``The library\'s lack of materials is so stark as to be shocking for anyone entering for the first time,\'\' the PTA said.

The group is holding an emergency meeting at the school at 7 tonight to plan strategy for getting books into the library. -- Read More

The funny side of censorship

I\'ve been waiting a long time for a story from The Onion.com

Nation\'s Teens Disappointed by Banned Books

Huckleberry Finn, Slaughterhouse Five, and The Catcher In The Rye are just a few of the many banned books to which U.S. teens are reacting with disappointment, the American Library Association reported Monday.

\"I was really psyched to read Huck Finn when my English teacher told me it was banned, because I figured, you know, it would be dirty,\" said Joshua Appel, a sophomore at Rocky Mount (VA) High School and one of 14,000 teenagers recently surveyed by the ALA. \"But it was totally lame: There was no sex or violence or anything. They say \'nigger\' in it, but I can hear that on half my CDs.\"

Utah State Senate approves filtering

USA Today reported yesterday that the Utah State Senate unanimously voted to withhold state funding from libraries that did not shield childeren under 18 from Web sites featuring obscene material.

The senate also approved a measure to ban from prisons, jails and juvenile detention centers magazines and other materials that \"features nudity\".

The bills now go to Governor Mike Leavitt.

Strike called off in T.O.

TORONTO (CP) - A tentative deal was reached late Monday between the city\'s public library and its workers.
The 2,500 library workers had set a weekend strike deadline, but the Canadian Union of Public Employees Local 416 and city officials agreed to keep talking.

The main issues in the dispute were wages, job security, hours of work and shift premiums.

A strike would have closed 98 libraries.

The agreement is subject to ratification by both the board and the union.

StopDrLaura.com

Salon has a story here on two new web sites.
StopDrLaura.com, and DrLaura.org. These 2 sites are anti-Dr. Laura sites. Remember the kind words she had for the ALA, and librarians, not long ago? StopDrLaura.com, is a very well designed site, not the average protest site to say the least.


As of 18:15gmt drlaura.org is not up yet, The Salon article does say they are to be launched today March 1, 2000.

John Aravosis, president of the Internet consulting firm Wired Strategies, is the firebrand behind the site. \"She\'s outrageous. She\'s beyond the pale of \'I\'m a Christian, I don\'t like gay people,\'\" says Aravosis.

Police say they caught library cat burglar

This story from The Times in Indiana

A 22-year-old man was arrested early Tuesday after he allegedly entered the Hobart branch of the Lake County Public Library through its roof.
The Hobart man was apprehended during police surveillance of the library.
Det. Corp. Steve Houck and Officer David Grissom were sitting in the darkened library about 1:15 a.m. Tuesday when they saw a man scuttle across the library floor on his hands and knees, Finnerty said.

\"He was a cat burglar, pure and simple. ... He (moved) like a little spider, \" Finnerty said. \"The waiting paid off. The surprise was on him, for a change.\"

E-Authors Make a Killing

Wired has this interesting Story on how authors are using the Web and DIY to start a career.

Publishers are paying more than attention to promotion-savvy e-authors who are building readership one chapter at a time. They\'re paying sizable advances -- especially to authors of fantastic tales.
The Internet is proving to be the milieu of choice for authors to post their serialized fiction

Maybe 13 is too young

Not everyone is happy about the video rental policy in MA, Story Here.

An Easthampton woman whose 13-year-old son recently came home from the library with several R-rated videos is mounting a campaign to give parents a say in what their children can check out from the library\'s collection.
Bennett, however, was not so happy. She and \"quite a few\" supporters plan to petition the library\'s executive board at its monthly meeting March 13 to set up a card system for library patrons under the age of 17 that will allow parents to indicate whether their children should be allowed to check out R-rated videos.

\"I\'m not (trying to) take away anybody\'s freedom,\" Bennett said yesterday, stressing that it should be up to parents to decide for their own children under age 17 whether they should have access to films that the movie industry has deemed suitable only for those aged 17 and above.

battlegrounds for Internet filter fights

The Citizen Times has a story on how filtering is become as issue in NC.

At issue is whether government-funded public library systems should install Internet \"filters\" designed to stop computer users from visiting sites deemed obscene or offensive, and if so, whether such filters unconstitutionally censor material.

For some library users, such as Art Joseph of Asheville, the question has a clear-cut answer. \"You need some type of filter. You can access anything on the Internet and I don\'t think the library is the place for that.\" -- Read More

Clone the library cat

Texas-based Genetic Savings and Clone last week opened its doors to pet lovers who want to store the DNA of a cherished animal companion in the hopes that one day they will be cloned.
The research effort expects to successfully clone Missy, a mongrel adopted from a dog pound, within three months to a year.

At least two dozen surrogate canine mothers have been implanted with clone embryos and the researchers are waiting to see which, if any, develop into pregnancies.

E-Pubs gaining speed

Someone suggested these 2 stories on epubs.


This one from Salon.In three years\' time, electronic-book devices will weigh less than a pound, run eight hours and cost as little as $99. By 2009, expect e-books to outsell the traditional paper variety in many categories, and in 2020, Webster\'s dictionary will alter the definition of \"book\" to include titles read onscreen. In typical Microsoft style, Hill figures that if Redmond puts its weight behind the idea, it can move mountains. \"It\'s one thing for a small device-manufacturer to go to a publisher and ask them to put titles in electronic form. It\'s quite another for Microsoft to do it,\" he says.


and this one from the gomez advisors

Visitors to Borders.com can click on links to three unrelated sites, each of which offer a selection of e-books and technologies to read them. In addition to giving customers variety, the plan will also allow Borders to learn more about which technologies and formats its customers prefer.

Borders has lagged behind its competitors in using the Web to help create customer loyalty. But now bibliophiles will have direct links to Peanut Press, which offers titles that can be read on a Palm Pilot; ION Systems, which provides technology to read books on personal computers; and SoftBook Press, which offers a dedicated hand-held device for electronic reading.

SCREEN OR PAGE?

This Story from Phillynews on UPenn going digital.

Aided by a $218,000 grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, Penn\'s library has begun publishing online every new history work that Oxford University Press produces over five years, roughly 1,500 titles.
Sixty-four complete digital replicas of printed books already are available for free to members of the Penn community through the library\'s digital books Web site. Penn librarians were briefed on the project last week. Those outside Penn can sample three books from the public portion of the site, HERE.\"For a long time I have been interested in books online and how they might impact the future of publishing,\" Barry said.
Mosher recalled: \"We were talking about the fact that the world seems to be divided into people who believe that in 10 years all books will be digital, and people who say, \'Never during our lifetimes will that happen! Who wants to read a bloody digital book?\'
\"What we thought was that there was too much emotion and not enough empirical evidence about the behavior of people reading [digital] books.\" -- Read More

At the library -- porno and porno seekers

This Editorial from Michigan Live provides another view from MI.

I\'m a First Amendment kind of guy and I
value the freedom of the press and
freedom of speech, but I think what is going on here
doesn\'t have anything to do with the freedom of anything
except the freedom to look at people involved in carnal
pleasures. The fact of the matter is that there is an
abundance of adults who are intrigued by pornography,
and they want to take a peek at it every so often. -- Read More

library restores Internet link

This Story from Hudsonville, MI.

The Gary Byker Memorial Library\'s Internet computers, which
had been unplugged since December, will fire up once again
after a city commission decision Wednesday to repeal an
Internet filter ordinance.
The city commission voted 6-1 in favor of an ordinance
submitted by about 80 Hudsonville residents asking that an
ordinance to filter all but one computer be repealed. -- Read More

AFA may try again for filters at library

This story leads me to believe the battle is not over in MI.

The American Family Association could return with another proposal to install Internet filters at Herrick District if local officials fail to address the organization\'s concerns, members say.\"If working with the mayor, City Council and the Library Board don\'t produce satisfactory results, it remains an option to Holland citizens to place it on the ballot again,\" Gary Glenn, the state AFA director, said Wednesday.

Glenn, who predicts a different outcome in a second vote, said enough signatures could be gathered by an Aug. 15 deadline to put the issue back before voters in November.

\"Obviously, a win would have been a greater help, but our resolve to take this to communities across the state is not deterred,\" Glenn said.

His comments did not sit well with filter foes. -- Read More

Library System Sued for Banning Bible

A story from the Conservative news on bible trouble in GA.

A public library system in Georgia faces a lawsuit for banning the display and distribution of small paperback Bibles in designated \"free literature\" areas.
Stuart J. Roth, an attorney with the ACLJ.

\"The law is very clear about this issue: if a library permits the display and distribution of other materials, it cannot legally exclude the Bible because the material is religious in nature.\"
The complaint said library officials allow other materials to be distributed in that area, including newspapers such as The South Georgia Business Journal and religious publications including the National Jewish Voice and The Testimony of Truth.

enterprise application integration with XML and LDAP

Someone suggested this rather technical article from IEMagazine on some new uses for XML and LDAP.

The slogan for enterprise application integration (EAI) projects ought to be: “The difficult we do immediately, the impossible takes a little longer.” The need for enterprise application integration is greater than ever. A lot of application integration is still done the old-fashioned way, with batch file transfers under manual control. However, the last few years have brought several important technologies adapted for EAI: object orientation, application servers, and now lightweight directory access protocol (LDAP) and extensible markup language (XML). -- Read More

The future of the book

Someone sent in This Story from the desertnews, it takes a good
look at ebooks.

Nancy Tessman is director of the Salt
Lake City Library, the institution that has become the Utah
focal point of the recent Library of Congress project, the
Center for the Book.
\"There\'s room for it all,\" she says. \"At the library,
we\'re not seeing anything but the traditional book format.
There is absolutely no sign of a lack of devotion to the
book itself. People want access to technological
information, but it is an option. The more access people
have, whether on the Web or on television, the more they
turn to traditional forces. Our book circulation is up -- Read More

Data Preservation in the Digital Age

David Fiander writes \"The folks over at slashdot are getting all excited about a a story about a new paper out of UMich that talks about the problems of data preservation in the digital age. As if it\'s a new problem, and not just a seriously exacerbated one \"

From Slashdot\"Recently there was an Ask Slashdot about the the problem of preserving digital material. The basic idea was that we are creating a massive wealth of digital information, but have no clear plan for preserving it. What happens to all of those poems I write when I try to access them for my grandkids? What about the pictures of my kids I took with that digital camera? Can I still get to them in time to embarrass them in the future?

Librarians set to book out as talks stall

Librarians in Toronto, Canada, are set to strike.

Talks to avert a strike that would close the city\'s 98 libraries at midnight tonight are on the verge of collapse, a union official said yesterday.

The city\'s 2,500 librarians will walk if a deal isn\'t reached by the strike deadline. \"We haven\'t had the major issues dealt with at this point,\" said Toronto Civic Employees\' Union Local 416 president Brian Cochrane. -- Read More

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