SCREEN OR PAGE?

This Story from Phillynews on UPenn going digital.

Aided by a $218,000 grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, Penn\'s library has begun publishing online every new history work that Oxford University Press produces over five years, roughly 1,500 titles.
Sixty-four complete digital replicas of printed books already are available for free to members of the Penn community through the library\'s digital books Web site. Penn librarians were briefed on the project last week. Those outside Penn can sample three books from the public portion of the site, HERE.\"For a long time I have been interested in books online and how they might impact the future of publishing,\" Barry said.
Mosher recalled: \"We were talking about the fact that the world seems to be divided into people who believe that in 10 years all books will be digital, and people who say, \'Never during our lifetimes will that happen! Who wants to read a bloody digital book?\'
\"What we thought was that there was too much emotion and not enough empirical evidence about the behavior of people reading [digital] books.\" -- Read More

At the library -- porno and porno seekers

This Editorial from Michigan Live provides another view from MI.

I\'m a First Amendment kind of guy and I
value the freedom of the press and
freedom of speech, but I think what is going on here
doesn\'t have anything to do with the freedom of anything
except the freedom to look at people involved in carnal
pleasures. The fact of the matter is that there is an
abundance of adults who are intrigued by pornography,
and they want to take a peek at it every so often. -- Read More

library restores Internet link

This Story from Hudsonville, MI.

The Gary Byker Memorial Library\'s Internet computers, which
had been unplugged since December, will fire up once again
after a city commission decision Wednesday to repeal an
Internet filter ordinance.
The city commission voted 6-1 in favor of an ordinance
submitted by about 80 Hudsonville residents asking that an
ordinance to filter all but one computer be repealed. -- Read More

AFA may try again for filters at library

This story leads me to believe the battle is not over in MI.

The American Family Association could return with another proposal to install Internet filters at Herrick District if local officials fail to address the organization\'s concerns, members say.\"If working with the mayor, City Council and the Library Board don\'t produce satisfactory results, it remains an option to Holland citizens to place it on the ballot again,\" Gary Glenn, the state AFA director, said Wednesday.

Glenn, who predicts a different outcome in a second vote, said enough signatures could be gathered by an Aug. 15 deadline to put the issue back before voters in November.

\"Obviously, a win would have been a greater help, but our resolve to take this to communities across the state is not deterred,\" Glenn said.

His comments did not sit well with filter foes. -- Read More

Library System Sued for Banning Bible

A story from the Conservative news on bible trouble in GA.

A public library system in Georgia faces a lawsuit for banning the display and distribution of small paperback Bibles in designated \"free literature\" areas.
Stuart J. Roth, an attorney with the ACLJ.

\"The law is very clear about this issue: if a library permits the display and distribution of other materials, it cannot legally exclude the Bible because the material is religious in nature.\"
The complaint said library officials allow other materials to be distributed in that area, including newspapers such as The South Georgia Business Journal and religious publications including the National Jewish Voice and The Testimony of Truth.

enterprise application integration with XML and LDAP

Someone suggested this rather technical article from IEMagazine on some new uses for XML and LDAP.

The slogan for enterprise application integration (EAI) projects ought to be: “The difficult we do immediately, the impossible takes a little longer.” The need for enterprise application integration is greater than ever. A lot of application integration is still done the old-fashioned way, with batch file transfers under manual control. However, the last few years have brought several important technologies adapted for EAI: object orientation, application servers, and now lightweight directory access protocol (LDAP) and extensible markup language (XML). -- Read More

The future of the book

Someone sent in This Story from the desertnews, it takes a good
look at ebooks.

Nancy Tessman is director of the Salt
Lake City Library, the institution that has become the Utah
focal point of the recent Library of Congress project, the
Center for the Book.
\"There\'s room for it all,\" she says. \"At the library,
we\'re not seeing anything but the traditional book format.
There is absolutely no sign of a lack of devotion to the
book itself. People want access to technological
information, but it is an option. The more access people
have, whether on the Web or on television, the more they
turn to traditional forces. Our book circulation is up -- Read More

Data Preservation in the Digital Age

David Fiander writes \"The folks over at slashdot are getting all excited about a a story about a new paper out of UMich that talks about the problems of data preservation in the digital age. As if it\'s a new problem, and not just a seriously exacerbated one \"

From Slashdot\"Recently there was an Ask Slashdot about the the problem of preserving digital material. The basic idea was that we are creating a massive wealth of digital information, but have no clear plan for preserving it. What happens to all of those poems I write when I try to access them for my grandkids? What about the pictures of my kids I took with that digital camera? Can I still get to them in time to embarrass them in the future?

Librarians set to book out as talks stall

Librarians in Toronto, Canada, are set to strike.

Talks to avert a strike that would close the city\'s 98 libraries at midnight tonight are on the verge of collapse, a union official said yesterday.

The city\'s 2,500 librarians will walk if a deal isn\'t reached by the strike deadline. \"We haven\'t had the major issues dealt with at this point,\" said Toronto Civic Employees\' Union Local 416 president Brian Cochrane. -- Read More

new limit for R-rated films is age 12

A story from Philadelphia shows kids
where to get R-Rated movies.


UPDATEA Report on the lack of protests.

Most favor
the Philadelphia system\'s decision to open access for
children as young as 12, down from 14.


Last year, the Free Library of Philadelphia got into a flap
over its policy of letting children as young as 14 borrow
R-rated movies.

Yesterday, library president Elliot L. Shelkrot acknowledged
that the policy had been changed. Now borrowers as young as
12 have access to all material, including videos.

\"The change in age is in response to the public,\" Shelkrot
said.
Only in four systems surveyed, including Detroit and San
Diego, were borrowers required to be 18 or older to take -- Read More

Minneapolis library out of answers

I\'m posting this one because it is so full of great quotes.
It\'s from Techserver.com

The pictures of child molestation, bestiality and other hardcore pornography were as shocking as they were graphic. But just as shocking was the place they were found - on computers at the downtown Minneapolis Public Library.

\"You\'d think a library would be a safe place, but I won\'t bring my daughter back there.\"

They have heard of related acts of sex and violence that have occurred in the library. They have heard that anyone walking through the library can see pornography on computers.

Some librarians wonder if their rights are being violated. Forty-seven of the approximately 140 downtown library employees signed a public letter of protest saying they feel \"harassed and intimidated by working in a public environment\" where they might \"be exposed to degrading or pornographic pictures.\"

Click on read more for a few more... -- Read More

Old computers threat to records

The BBC has a story on how computers will start to decompose with important records.


Vital archaeological records could be
lost forever because the computers
they are stored on become quickly
obsolete.

The physical site is nearly always
completely destroyed during a dig,
but archaeologists claim the
knowledge they glean from the
ground is then available for posterity.\"The irony is that archaeological
information held in magnetic format
is decaying faster than it ever did in
the ground,\" warns William Kilbride of
the Archaeology Data Service (ADS)
at the University of York. -- Read More

Public peeved about S.F. library

A story on the new library in San Francisco, CA.


A city-commissioned report calling for $28 million in fixes to the 3-year-old Main Library received its first public airing.

The $240,000 report was commissioned to find solutions to a shortage of library shelf space and to complaints that books were difficult to find. But several of the nearly 60 people who attended Thursday night\'s meeting were disabled and worried the direction of the study would exclude them from the library\'s services.
\"Get a little sense,\" said the 54-year-old San Francisco resident as he addressed the commissioners and the team of library experts that worked on the study. \"I can\'t believe the commission paid to have this survey done.\" -- Read More

The end of News Groups?

News.com is running a story on how MSN is dropping support for newsgroups. We are removing newsgroups from MSN servers because we now have a better communication vehicle provided by MSN Web Communities--including chat, message boards, email and Web pages,\" the representative wrote in an email. While newsgroups will no longer be supported on MSN.com, they will still be available at the company\'s corporate Web site, Microsoft.com.

News.com seems to think this is the begining of the end for newsgroups. What does the LIS community think of this? Most librarians are subscribed to a number of different lists, and use them as a primary source for news and information. Certainly this is not the begining of the end, or is it? -- Read More

Voters reject filters for library computers

Bob Cox sent in this St
ory

Voters on Tuesday rejected a measure that would have
required the city to stop funding the Herrick District
Library unless it installs Internet filters on its
computers.
In unofficial results, voters in Holland rejected the
measure, 4,379 to 3,626.
Thousands cast their ballots on an ordinance that has
divided the conservative west Michigan com

limiting access to Harry Potter books

Harry sure does get in alot of trouble. Full story Here from mlive.com

Zeeland\'s Board of Education stood behind a decision Monday that limits access in the district to the Harry Potter book series.
Superintendent Gary Feenstra issued a memo to staff in November that prohibits Zeeland teachers from reading the books aloud in class.

Checkout of the first three books of the series, written by Scottish author J.K. Rowling, is restricted to fifth- through eighth-graders who show written permission from their parents. Feenstra\'s order also says the district will buy no more installments in the series.\"You can\'t pretend there is no such thing as right and wrong,\" Van Rhee said.

Lisa VanDerKolk said that even though the books are a work of fiction, the witchcraft and wizardry could still give children ideas. \"This stuff is real, and kids can get mixed up in it,\" she said. -- Read More

book kept on the shelf at school

A story out of OH, on the fight over a book.

A book about the devil, demons, the underworld, and the occult is never again going to leave Northwood High School.

In a compromise with two parents who wanted the book removed altogether, school board members have decided to prohibit students from taking the book from the library.

\"They were concerned about students taking it home to use without supervision,\" James Herr holtz, principal, said. \"Now it is to be a reference book, and I think it was a win-win situation.\"
\"I wanted the book out, but I felt that was the most I was going to get,\" Mrs. Richardson added. \"It could be a stepping stone for pursuing more information like this and with all the violence that is going on, we have to realize how influential [children] are.\" -- Read More

library alters its policy on book list

This Story is a follow up on the report we had a few weeks ago on a charge of censorship in a library.

In the aftermath of a charge of censorship, the Schaumburg Township library board has revised its policy on how new materials are added to its collection.
On Monday, the board voted to add an appeals process to the policy. The move came a month after the board denied a request by Hoffman Estates resident Christopher Bollyn to donate a copy of \"Final Judgment\" by Michael Collins Piper to the library.
The library\'s criteria to decide whether to acquire a book, ranges from the reputation or significance of the author to reviews of the material and its cost. -- Read More

The Not So Quiet Librarian

A Super Duper story HERE on the new director of the Detroit Public Library


Maurice Wheeler is the first African-American male to head the 135-year-old institution. At 41, he\'s also the youngest. And while many of the previous directors were bespectacled, the new director\'s glasses are decidedly hip.

\"I think we should be providing services that excite people,\" Wheeler says. \"This is not going to be the library of the past where you had to be afraid that the librarian would shush you. We want the library to be a social place. A place where everyone belongs.\" -- Read More

Win $100

Jamie at Slashdot.org continues his Must Read Filtering Series with this challenge.

Rules for the $100 offer are as follows. Find a search result URL that shows naked people, for a search on \"chocolate chip cookies\" or \"chocolate chip cookie recipes.\" I\'ll accept any variant that an inexperienced Web-surfer might search for. Your result must appear on one of the first five pages of results returned (typically the first 50 results). I\'ll accept any major search engine. Send me the exact query you used; I will only accept queries I can verify to work as claimed. You aren\'t allowed to put up a cookie page, submit it, then change its content; to prevent this, you have until 11:59 PM EST, Wednesday the 23rd. Only the first person gets the money; order is determined by timestamp of Received: headers at my server. I\'ll mail you a check or donate it to your favorite charity. This offer is made by me personally, not Slashdot, Andover.net, or VA Linux. Notify me at jamie@mccarthy.org.

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