Related article on Transylvania rare books theft

Catherine Lavallée-Welch writes "Article on rare books thefts in libraries, following the event at Transylvania University. Snitch.com Has The Story"

Are too many choices narrowing our view?

Librmt writes "The Seattle Post-Intelligencer reviews familiar new technologies from a user perspective--including libraries and the King County Library System's new downloadable audiobooks. Story here."

100 Best Scottish Books of All Time

This Thursday, to coincide with World Book Day, culture minister Patricia Ferguson will begin the hunt. At a glittering ceremony, the minister will unveil a guide compiled with the Scottish Book Trust and the List magazine to the 100 Best Scottish Books of All Time and invite the public to start voting for their favourite work from the list.
But the campaign has run into controversy just days before it has begun after a draft list obtained by Scotland On Sunday shows a number of peculiar omissions and inclusions.
The winner will be announced at the Edinburgh International Book Festival in August but if you think the arguments will end there, forget it – with only one book allowed per author, the tome in question might not even be on Maley’s list. Who’s to say that Welsh’s Marabou Stork Nightmares won’t be preferred to Trainspotting? And who can discount the Harry Potter factor? Barry Didcock Says There could be a few red faces in Charlotte Square come August.

Pinter picks poetry, politics over plays

slashgirl writes "' Harold Pinter, one of the U.K.'s greatest living dramatists, is turning away from playwriting to focus on politics and poetry.

"I think I've stopped writing plays now, but I haven't stopped writing poems," Pinter, the man behind such works as The Homecoming, The Caretaker and No Man's Land, told the BBC this week.'

The rest of the story is here."

Fancy sitting down with a good book? You'll be lucky

Anonymous Patron writes "Finding room to read at the British Library is no mean feat for established users, as seats are increasingly filled by twittering students fiddling with their phones, says John Sutherland @EducationGuardian.co.uk"

Students really using libraries!

Cortez writes "Demonstrating the possibilties of new technology and historic records, students bring the past alive: http://www.common-place.org/vol-05/no-03/school/
"The high-school students in the extracurricular Project Apprentice to History (PATH) in Beverly, Massachusetts, are not your typical honors students, yet their achievements are extraordinary.""

Florida College Students Concerned about Library Hours

Anonymous Patron writes "students at the University of South Florida are not happy with the very reduced hours at the university's library. More here from The Oracle."

Jazz Discovery at Library of Congress

gsandler writes "

Here is a
story from the New York Times on the discovery by the Library of Congress of a
previously unknown recording of the Thelonious Monk Quartet with John Coltrane.
There are very few recordings of this period of John Coltrane's career. "During this period, Coltrane fully collected himself as an improviser, challenged by Monk and the discipline of his unusual harmonic sense. Thus began the 10-year sprint during which he changed jazz completely, before his death in 1967."
(Registration at the NY Times web site is required.)

"

Controversy colors teen book

Anonymous Patron writes "USATODAY.com Rainbow Party, aimed at the teen market (ages 14 and up), has some booksellers and librarians wondering whether author Paul Ruditis sensationalizes the subject — and, more significantly, whether they should carry it on their shelves."

The People's do-it-yourself library

Cortez writes "With the eroding financial support from government entities, the folks in Boston's Papercut: http://www.baamboston.org/papercut/ might be on to something: http://www.bostonphoenix.com/boston/news_features/ this_just_in/documents/04701066.asp
"It’s Tuesday afternoon, three days after the Papercut ’Zine Library opened, and Mothra, the bullet-belted punk-rock librarian on duty, is sitting in a comfy chair explaining what inspired the venture: a pile of ’zines collecting dust on her best friend’s floor. "I was like, ‘Isn’t there some way to let other people use these?""

Too soon to let computers replace university libraries

Anonymous Patron writes "The Japan Times Online has one that looks at The University of Texas (UT) at Austin's decision to remove almost all the books from its undergraduate library to provide space for a digital learning center, where students can use computers to access a wide variety of information. University officials are proud to be leading a trend.
It is good to see academia catching up with technology. But what are the repercussions of this shift? I am thinking about this from various perspectives: Teacher, researcher, author and reader.

Note from RH: The article mistakenly identifies the library as being in Houston. It's at the UT-Austin."

Ohio Budget Bill Remains Pending

AshtabulaGuy writes "Ohio House Bill 66 currently weighs in at twenty megabytes which is a tall order to be viewed over dial-up. The bill remains in the Ohio Senate Finance and Financial Institutions Committee for now. A four megabyte doc
ument is available in Adobe Acrobat format that highlights differences between the Senate's present version and what the House passed
. These are primary documents that cannot be just ignored as we get closer to the Ohio state budget deadline of July 1."

Why has Uncle Tom's Cabin survived—and thrived?

Anonymous Patron writes "Over @Slate, Stephen Metcalf asks Uncle Tom's Children - Why has Uncle Tom's Cabin survived—and thrived? We have here an interesting puzzle. How has Uncle Tom's Cabin survived, and thrived, if it proved so offensive to the 20th-century aspirations of the African-Americans it helped liberate in the 19th? Why isn't Uncle Tom's Cabin like Wittgenstein's ladder: Once climbed, it is obsolete, and we ought to throw it away?
The answer, he believes, can be found in an essay from 1978 by Jane Tompkins, a prominent feminist literary critic"

Need for First Amendment Education

Kathleen writes "Judge Marjorie O. Rendell, First Lady of Pennsylvania has stated, "The only way to hold on to our freedom is to give it away -- and liberally -- to those who come after us. In your own sphere of influence, in your own way, I invite you to join with me and give back meaning to the word "citizen." Concerned by a recent study that demonstrates a decline in understandidng of the First Amendment, Judge Rendell advocates citizenship education.

“The Future of the First Amendment,� found that educators are failing to give high school students an appreciation of the First Amendment’s guarantees of free speech and a free press. The study by researchers from the University of Connecticut questioned more than 100,000 high school students, nearly 8,000 teachers, and more than 500 administrators and principals."

Labeling YA books

Suzanne writes "A library trustee in Guilderland, NY, wants to put labels on YA novels that have "racy" content. He says he doesn't object to the descriptions of sex, just that books containing the descriptions are available to young teens.
If all these attempts at library labeling and restrictions continue and are successful, I envision future libraries being made up of lots of little rooms, each with a bouncer at the door. More from the
Times Union. =366220&category=REGION&newsdate=6/2/2005"

Ingram changes the rules

librarydragon1 writes "Just got this from our library system lisserve If your vendor is Ingram, and you're expecting the new HP book to to be out for your patrons this Saturday, don't hold your breath:
"Hi, all. I just had a disturbing conversation with Customer Service at
Ingram Books. Apparently, if you have pre-ordered less than 10 copies of
Harry Potter from them, they will not deliver on time for Saturday's release
date. I was told that they will be shipped on Friday for Monday delivery.
When I mentioned that I have received every other title in the series
early, they said that "this is the way we're doing it this time." Needless
to say, I am quite vexed! I thought I would pass it along for you
information.""

Library Flasher Caught

A man accused of exposing himself to two young girls at Fairfax County (VA) libraries this past week, has been arrested after one of the girls alerted library staff. More here at ABC7 news. Also of interest are the comments that accompany the story.

Because of cell phones, it may be harder for flashers to get away with public activity. This guy's career is definitely over.

Board Member Rebuts Papers "Anti-Library" Campaign

Jay writes "'Rebutting the newspaper's anti-library campaign' is a letter submitted in response to a recent editorial about furnishings for the new library. The article, entitled: "To sit or not to sit: The $329,000 question," appeared in The Daily Dispatch on Wednesday, Sept. 14, 2005.

It's a long article but shows a strong support for a new library renovation project by a member of the Board of Trustees of H. Leslie Perry Memorial Library H. Leslie Perry Memorial Library in Henderson, North Carolina.
Excerpts from the article:

"Another gauge of how important the library is to the community is the astounding level of donations the project has received from our community, again despite the bad press from the Dispatch. When funds were raised to build the YMCA in 1988, contributions totaled approximately $1,600,000."

"My own concerns for the library include that critical issue of jobs, but they cover more ground than that. First, the public library is the only institution I know of in any community that directly serves people of every age in the broadest circumstances. It serves people who are young and old, rich and poor, lying in a sick bed or out and about in the bloom of health, God-fearing or atheist, Democrat or Republican, employed or looking to find a job. Because the library serves people from so many different backgrounds and circumstances, it supports the missions of many other institutions in our community, particularly the schools."

-- Read More

Librarian uses puppets as a teaching tool

Anonymous Patron writes "Here's A Good PR Lesson from a small town paper in the UP of MI. Puppets are helping Lakeview School third graders improve their reading skills.

Lakeview librarian Gina Sorensen, who came up with the puppet project, has assigned six groups of third graders to work together to put on a puppet show. Each show is based on various "fractured" fairy tales. The scripted puppet shows are derived from the classic fairy tales, but a twist has been added to each story.
Includes exciting action photo!"

NS tale slays Atwood giant in Canada Reads

slashgirl writes "'Rockbound, a 1928 novel by little-known author Frank Parker Day, has emerged victorious in CBC's annual Canada Reads book battle.'

'In a classic David-and-Goliath confrontation, Rockbound defeated Margaret Atwood's Oryx and Crake, a heavy-hitter that has been nominated for some of the world's most prestigious literary prizes over the past two years, including the Orange, Booker and Giller prizes. The dystopian novel is also currently competing for the 2005 IMPAC Dublin Literary Award.'

Rest of the story here."

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