Arizona HB 2439 - unnecessary legislation that will hurt Arizona libraries

Library districts need to adapt to the needs of their communities. A one-size-fits-all tax levy simply will not work. The library districts in Arizona have never been accused of abusing their authority, and, what’s more, they provide valuable service to all of the libraries in their geographic areas.

Read more from The Hipster Librarian.

Reimagining the book - The End Of Passive

http://aenism.com/end-of-passive/
"Now imagine that a reader can choose to be any character in the story. At any point in the book, the events are premeditated by the prior decisions of an instance of a character played by another reader and your actions is going to determine how another reader’s story will play out. With each juncture, your story is matched with someone else’s so your fates intertwines. With a tree like this, there will be multiple endings and not every branch will lead to an ending. Some unfortunately lead to the demise of a character. Perhaps only a few branches for each character will lead it to one of its favorable endings. Like how you may still be fatally struck by lightning in real life despite living healthily, your encounters are out of your control so you will never have ultimate control of your fate."

This is how Google is killing the Web

http://pando.com/2014/01/27/this-is-how-google-is-killing-the-web/
But you won’t find these great sites on the first page of Google results—you might not find them on the first 10. As a result, these services, some of them genuinely life-changing, get lost in the dark recesses of the Internet. Even when you find these gems, you probably won’t think to access them the next time you log on. Their biggest challenge is finding a large enough audience to create a habit around their product.

Creating a habit around a product is limited by the way we browse the Web.

Take a moment and think about the browser user experience. It hasn’t changed much in the past 20 years and since the days of Netscape, we’ve been confined to a search box. We need to know exactly what we’re looking for, either through a search or by typing in the exact web address.

Queens Library president gets $390G salary, luxe office makeover while shedding 130 jobs

http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/queens/queens-library-president-390g-shedding-130-jobs-a...

Last year, Queens Library President Thomas Galante was paid more than the mayor or the MTA chairman, and spent $140,000 to renovate his offices at the Central Library. Meanwhile, Galante eliminated nearly 130 library jobs through layoffs and attrition over the past five years.

11th Annual BookFinder.com Report Out-of-print and in demand

http://www.bookfinder.com/books/bookfinder_report/BookFinder_Report_2013.mhtml

In this the 11th annual BookFinder.com Report we publish a list of the top 100 most searched for out of print book titles from the previous 12 months. The books featured in this 2013 edition of the report run the gambit of publishing from true to life memoirs to science fiction, cookery to crochet, and firearms to photography.

Most of the books published over the course of history are out of print today. For hundreds of years the lifecycle for the vast majority of books has been the same: a book is written, it is published, many people buy and enjoy it, the book begins to fall out of favor and then publishers stop printing copies and the book falls out of print. This happens to exceptional books, average books and books that perhaps should never have seen the light of day in the first place. This lifecycle remained the same from the days Gutenberg walked the earth until the very recent past; a book being out of print meant it was a dead book. Once a book was dead the only way you were going to read a copy was to find someone to lend, give or sell it to you, or convince a publisher that issuing a new pressing was going to be financially viable.

Subterranean trove of books, papers at risk in NYS Education Building

http://www.timesunion.com/local/article/State-Library-s-tough-calls-on-what-to-save-what-515...

It is an eerie bibliophile's netherworld, accessible by cramped cages of creaky service elevators, dark and cool and redolent of mildew, old leather bindings and sloughing paper that litters the floor like snowflakes. There is no climate control among miles of metal shelves, and accessing the hundreds of thousands of volumes is an arduous task. From the time a patron requests a book at the State Library, it typically takes two days to retrieve. A clerk drives a van four blocks around the Plaza, descends into the stacks, hunts among the haphazard holdings and drives back with the book.

[Thanks Elaine!]

Library cuts trigger fears of Canadian knowledge drain

http://www.ottawacitizen.com/news/Library+cuts+trigger+fears+knowledge+drain/9432991/story.html
“With libraries closing, there’s content … that’s no longer available to the users be they researchers, members of the public, people who are developing policy in government departments and that’s always worrying,” said Marie DeYoung, president of the Canadian Library Association and librarian at Saint Mary’s University in Halifax.

Google Tips and Tricks Every Student Should Know

http://lifehacker.com/google-tips-and-tricks-every-student-should-know-1508121671

Whether you're a student in college (or earlier) or a lifelong learner, Google is an essential tool for learning. Here are a few tips for using Google search and other apps more effectively to further your education.

Many of these tips you've no doubt learned before from our previous Google coverage, but every worthwhile subject is worth reviewing now and again, and today we're looking specifically at the best Google tricks for students. So here we go!

The Library of the Future Is Here

http://www.theatlanticcities.com/design/2014/01/library-future-here/8193/

The library of the 21st century still has books, but it also has 3-D printers, laser cutters, sewing machines, and spaces for conducting business meetings. It offers computer coding classes. It has advanced video- and audio-production software. All things that might and individual may find too expensive but can still benefit from using.

Cat Abandons Fish Truck for Brooklyn Public Library

http://www.wnyc.org/story/cat-abandons-fish-truck-library-residency/?.com

Rosie, a Long Island cat that went missing after stowing away on a fish truck nearly eight months ago, resurfaced this week, after a brief residency in the basement of the Brooklyn Public Library.

Rosie’s owner, Stephanie Villani, said the curious cat sneaked aboard her husband’s fish truck last Memorial Day weekend, hitching a ride to the farmer’s market at Grand Army Plaza where the couple has been selling fish for more than 20 years. When Villani’s husband opened the doors of the truck, Rosie surprised him by leaping out and sprinting into nearby Prospect Park.

libraries, facing an increasingly diverse clientele, bring communities together

http://www.nationaljournal.com/next-america/perspectives/libraries-as-america-s-techno-glue-...
At a time when more information is moving online and into digital formats, our patrons highly value free access to books and the range of resources and programs available at the library. To accommodate the high demand for digital services, we added several Internet-equipped computers to the computer lab and expanded library space for laptop users. As a library director, I see students, parents, and readers turn to the library when they need homework help, children's books, historical information, or research assistance.

Edge is a new management and leadership tool that is helping libraries

http://www.libraryedge.org/

The Edge Initiative was developed by a national coalition of leading library and local government organizations, funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, and led by the Urban Libraries Council. It was created with the vision that all people should have opportunities to enrich and improve their lives through open access to information, communication, and technology services provided by public libraries. Edge is a groundbreaking, first of its kind management and leadership tool, helping libraries create a path for the continuous growth and development of their public technology services.

Through an easy to use suite of tools, Edge supports libraries in making strategic decisions and identifying areas for improvement. The Edge Toolkit gives libraries a look into their local data, from operations to partnerships and programming, to assess how their community is using the technology and how best practices can be put into place to align future growth and services with community priorities. It also provides useful resources to package and showcase the data to other community leaders.

A New Library for Bethlehem NH

From New Hampshire Public Radio. A sweet story of a sister, a brother and a mystery donation.

The Decline of the American Book Lover

From The Atlantic. Subtitle is "and why the downturn might be over".

The Pew Research Center reported last week that nearly a quarter of American adults had not read a single book in the past year. As in, they hadn't cracked a paperback, fired up a Kindle, or even hit play on an audiobook while in the car. The number of non-book-readers has nearly tripled since 1978.

The Zen of Web Discovery

The Zen of Web Discovery: Whether you're just thinking of getting a new resource discovery layer; are starting implementation but are overwhelmed by the number of configuration options for your new product; or already have a site in production that is unfortunately going unacknowledged by coworkers, this article is written for you. It gives an overview of strategies for successfully managing the change that comes with a new web-scale discovery system.

Many libraries have revitalized their role by offering an updated resource discovery layer. This article gives an informal overview of design principles and best practices for implementing a web-scale discovery system. Emphasis is placed on the proper service philosophy of supporting a new technology, with open communications and evidence-based customization.

Porn at libraries: Morris official's advice isn't an ethics violation, state says

An ethics complaint by a self-described "library watchdog" alleging a prominent Morris County official misled local libraries, telling them they have to allow pornography on publicly accessible computers, has been dismissed.

In the complaint, Dan Kleinman, who runs SafeLibraries.Blogspot.com, said Ann Grossi "has materially mislead the communities of Roxbury and Montville into allowing pornography in the public libraries, despite community desires to remove it and despite the law."

http://www.nj.com/morris/index.ssf/2014/01/porn_at_libraries_attorneys_advice_isnt_an_ethics...

The ‘Starbucks effect’ and the changing role of our libraries

“Thirty years ago people primarily came in and checked books out and left,” she said. “Now we have a whole lot of people coming in who want a comfy chair and a place to do their reading.” Patrons today, she said, look at the physical library more like a “third place” outside of home or office, where they can do work, ask for assistance, use wi-fi or computers: “It’s the Starbucks effect.”

http://blogs.kcrw.com/whichwayla/2014/01/the-starbucks-effect-and-the-changing-role-of-our-l...

Health Canada library changes leave scientists scrambling

Health Canada scientists are so concerned about losing access to their research library that they're finding work-arounds, with one squirrelling away journals and books in his basement for colleagues to consult, says a report obtained by CBC News.

The draft report from a consultant hired by the department warned it not to close its library, but the report was rejected as flawed and the advice went unheeded.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/health-canada-library-changes-leave-scientists-scrambling-1....

The awkward copyright collision of Fair Use and Creative Commons

But Fair Use is an exemption from copyright enforcement- it is not a transfer of rights. There is no conceivable reading of Fair Use that allows an image user to then broker permissions for other users. Journal X cannot license my work away from me without my say so. They do not have standing to apply a CC license to my work.

The solution should be easy enough. Journal X could exempt contributed images from their blanket CC-license, and they should ensure the images are not atomized and separated from the rest of the paper. The Fair Use of images depends on their context within the publication, anyway.

http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/compound-eye/2014/01/19/the-awkward-copyright-collision-...

Is The NY Public Library Deceiving the Public?

An interesting facebook post by New York State Assemblyman Micah Z. Kellner about the NYPL:

I am profoundly disturbed that the leadership of the New York Public Library (NYPL) is using misleading and deceptive language in an attempt to trick New Yorkers into supporting its controversial Central Library Plan for the main 42nd Street Branch.

While purporting to expand public access to the 42nd Street Library, the Central Library Plan is instead a half-baked real estate deal that will result in the selling off of the largest and most used lending library in New York City, the Mid-Manhattan branch at East 40th Street, and the gutting of the fabled stacks at the NYPL’s Main Branch, which house the world-class collections of books and research materials that make the world's leading free research library truly unique. Millions of volumes currently available on-site in the stacks will be warehoused in New Jersey, lessening public access to a public resource unparalleled anywhere in the Western Hemisphere.

By issuing a mass appeal yesterday urging New Yorkers to ‘Support … the daily work of NYPL's network of 88 branches (and) a renovated central branch library that provides longer hours, additional public space, and more resources for children, teens, teachers, and job seekers,” the NYPL is claiming that selling off its largest circulating branch and eviscerating the Main Library’s fabled stacks, at an estimated cost to City taxpayers of $150 million, is improving the NYPL for everyday New Yorkers, when the exact opposite is the case. This is truly an example of Orwellian double-speak. The NYPL’s leadership must harbor serious doubts about the merits and practicality of its Central Library plan to employ such a willfully deceptive appeal. -- Read More

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