Costco stores as role models for Internet-era public libraries (caveats ahead)

The rage is to compare everything in creation to a business. But be careful when doing so with America's public libraries. They are civic and service institutions, not profit-making corporations. A major caveat!

Just the same, in a library context, I was intrigued when President Obama once again singled out Costco for its success. It's delighted shareholders in recent years while paying hourly workers around $21 per hour on the average. Granted, Costco isn't your typical retail chain. It focuses on upscale markets (and bulk purchases). By contrast, public libraries need to serve everyone, especially the poor. That's yet another caveat.

Still, in Costco, I see a few lessons for public libraries in the digital era:

Read the full article here.

Pew Study: Many Technophiles Also Love Libraries

In its latest study, Pew set out to determine what types of people use and value public libraries. It compared highly engaged, "library lovers" and "information omnivores" to those who have never used a library, people dubbed "distant admirers" and "off the grid." According to Pew, 30 percent of Americans are in those first two categories. Another 39 percent are considered to have "medium engagement" with libraries, even though only half of those have used a library in the past year.

Full piece on NPR

Careless Weeding or Something Else?

From The East Bay Express (Alameda Cty, CA):

Library administrators are discarding older books in bulk, prompting a backlash from longtime staff members.

Library administrators have ordered staff to discard books in bulk. With increased funding for materials this fiscal year, managers are making room for newer books and as a result have been trashing older ones in mass quantities, staff members said. The practice, they said, has been rushed and haphazard — and not in line with the standard guidelines for "weeding," the term librarians use to describe the process of moving books out of collections. In Albany, thousands of good books that could be donated or given away are instead ending up in the trash, the employees said. They noted that while this policy is especially widespread at their branch, it appears that this careless discarding is happening across the Alameda County Library system.

"Everyone is amazed by the amount of stuff going to the garbage bins," said Dan Hess, a children's librarian in Albany. He has worked at that branch for four years and has been an employee of Alameda County Library for fourteen years. "It's like forty years and forty different brains thinking what should be in the library [are being] swept away in two months," he said. "We're having this infusion of new money and materials that are coming very fast into the library. It's pushing us to change the criteria for what we are discarding." Hess said that managers have directed staffers to effectively remove most books bought before 2001, with little regard to the content, condition, or other factors librarians would typically take into consideration. "All you have left is the new. To me, that is not a library."

Time Again for...Library Cats

Via Mental Floss.

The Generousity of a New Yorker Who Loved to Read

Simply because she loved to read, Lotte Fields bequeathed $6 million to the New York Public Library after her death, the library announced on Wednesday.

Mrs. Fields, a New Yorker who died last summer at 89, inherited her wealth from her husband’s family, who were wool merchants.

“One of her great joys was spending the weekend reading with her husband,” said Irwin Cantor, Ms. Fields’s executor, in a statement. “Her donation shows just how much Lotte loved books and how important she felt it was to support her fellow book lovers.” Because Ms. Fields had been a modest – though regular – donor to the library in the past, Tony Marx, the library’s president, said the library was “astounded” by her bequest.

“But we are deeply honored to pick up her mantle and promote the joy of reading,” he added. At Ms. Fields’ request, the library will evenly divide the funds between its branch libraries and the Stephen A. Schwarzman Building on 42nd Street.

Let's hope they don't apply the donation to destroying the classic Bryant Park Main Library.

New Tech City Story on South by Southwest & Google Glass

Listen to host Manoush Zomorodi* of NPR determine people's opinions about Google Glass (affordability, issues of privacy). Have you tried it out? What do you think? I saw a few folks wearing Glass at ALA-MW.

Here's New Tech City's website and here's South by Southwest's website.

(*Finally figured out how Ms. Zomorodi's name is spelled).

Libraries and Broadband: Urgency and Impact; Public Hearing

There is an announcement in the March 11, Federal Register for - Notice of public hearing; request
for comments.

The U.S. Institute of Museum and Library Services is holding a public hearing, ‘‘Libraries and Broadband: Urgency and Impact,’’ to examine the need for high speed broadband in America’s libraries. The Institute of Museum and Library Services is charged with advising the President and Congress about the library, museum and
information service needs of the American public.

DATES: Public Hearing: April 17, 2014,
9:00 a.m.—12:00 p.m. Requests to
Participate: Submit requests to
participate at the meeting by March 24,
2014. Written Comments: Written
comments received by May 1, 2014 will
be part of the record.

See full notice here.

Colleges Need Free Speech More Than Trademarks

Colleges Need Free Speech More Than Trademarks
http://chronicle.com/article/Colleges-Need-Free-Speech-More/144907/
Registrations and rights-claiming of this sort are unwarranted in higher education. Trademarks are meant to be vehicles for reducing consumer confusion, not rewards for brand-building. Because trademark registrations signify rights to commercial uses of words, rights holders and the public often mistakenly think they confer ownership of words themselves. This misperception tends to promote risk aversion and stifle otherwise fair expression. Determining when a mark is confusingly similar to another, or distinguishing impermissible commercial uses of a term from fair uses of it, is complicated.

NYS launches DaybyDayNY to help library staff further enhance and expand their early literacy services and programs

New York State Librarian, Bernard A. Margolis, announced today the soft launch of DaybyDayNY (http://daybydayny.org/), an early literacy website designed to engage families and very young children in reading, learning and public libraries.

DaybyDayNY is an important component of Ready to Read at New York Libraries, a new statewide program from the New York State Library designed to help library staff further enhance and expand their early literacy services and programs.

DaybyDayNY is a virtual calendar with content that changes every day. This unique setup gives families with young children numerous daily activities and a story to read together. The story, provided each day by One More Story (http://www.onemorestory.com/), is in the form of an eBook that includes original music and sound effects, produced by former Sesame Street Music Director, Robby Merkin. In addition, the website includes monthly activities, storytelling and nursery rhyme videos, rhymes for young children, craft activities for children and their caregivers, a link to “Find Your Public Library,” a New York State map of museums with activities for young families, health information, and reading lists. The website is designed to help parents and caregivers increase their young child’s cognitive skills and have fun together at the same time.

We hope libraries and systems will promote the use of this website to all young families and caregivers. Information about linking from your library or system website to DaybyDayNY and promoting the website with community members and partners is available at (http://daybydayny.org/) and scroll to the bottom of the page to click on “Share This Site.” -- Read More

Students, faculty decry Penn plan to cut math and science libraries

Students, faculty decry Penn plan to cut math and science libraries

A plan by the University of Pennsylvania to cut back on two of its branch libraries - one for engineering and the other for math, physics, and astronomy - has yielded an outcry from students and professors who say the books are critical to their studies and research.

Read more at:
philly.com/philly/education/20140311_Students__faculty_decry_Penn_plan_to_cut_math_and_science_libraries.html

Philadelphia Mayor Nutter apologizes for cutting library funds, plans to reinstate $2.5 million

"Calling library closings the "absolute worst decision" in his 20 years in elected office, Mayor Nutter took time in his budget address Thursday to apologize for the cuts he made in 2008.

City Council "was right on this issue . . . and I've been determined to correct my mistake ever since," Nutter said after proposing a $2.5 million increase for the Free Library.

The new funding would let the library system hire 43 people and keep all neighborhood libraries open six days a week. Since the 2008 budget cuts, most of the branch libraries have been open only five days."

http://articles.philly.com/2014-03-08/news/48009426_1_library-closings-free-library-library-...

Women's Library to reopen doors at London School of Economics

http://www.theguardian.com/books/2014/mar/10/womens-library-reopen-london-school-economics-lse

The Women's Library, the oldest and most extensive collection on women's history in Europe, is about to open its doors again in what campaigners hope will be a permanent home, after almost a century of repeatedly having to pack up and move a unique archive of books, letters, diaries, magazines, protest banners, pamphlets and photographs.

Although the London School of Economics, whose founders shared many of the radical ideals of the women who started the library, has pledged to care for the collection and keep it open to members of the public as well as academics, the move was bitterly contentious to some.

India's Plan To Resurrect Ghost Libraries

http://www.telegraphindia.com/1140310/jsp/nation/story_18064282.jsp

"You have come across them in your city, town or village — cramped, dusty and poorly lit buildings with racks of tattered, hard-bound books no one seems interested in. Short of staff and new publications, these public libraries can count themselves lucky if they can attract a handful of readers looking for the day’s newspapers. The Union culture ministry now plans to upgrade at least the top 10 per cent among the country’s 54,000-odd public libraries, most of which seem to be on their deathbed. First, it wants to start a nationwide survey of about 5,000 of these libraries — the bigger and better ones."

Budget cuts leave about half of L.A. Unified's elementary and middle schools without librarians

Budget cuts leave about half of L.A. Unified's elementary and middle schools without librarians

The crisis has exacerbated educational inequalities across the nation's second-largest system, as some campuses receive extra money for library staff and others don't. It has also sparked a prolonged labor conflict with the California School Employees Assn., which represents library aides.

Since 2011, the union has alleged that L.A. Unified laid off their members, then illegally allowed parent volunteers, instructional aides and others to do their work at nearly four dozen campuses. The district issued a bulletin last year clarifying that library work can be performed only by those with proper credentials, but the union asserts that violations are still occurring. The issue is set for a hearing by the state Public Employment Relations Board in May.

http://www.latimes.com/local/la-me-lausd-libraries-20140224,0,5992443.story#ixzz2vYldq2mO

Sony And Panasonic Announce New 300GB “Archival Disc” Storage Medium

Sony & Panasonic announced that they have formulated "Archival Disc", a new standard for professional-use, next-generation optical discs, with the objective of expanding the market for long-term digital data storage.

Optical discs have excellent properties to protect themselves against the environment, such as dust-resistance and water-resistance, and can also withstand changes in temperature and humidity when stored. They also allow inter-generational compatibility between different formats, ensuring that data can continue to be read even as formats evolve. This makes them robust media for long-term storage of content. Recognizing that optical discs will need to accommodate much larger volumes of storage going forward, particularly given the anticipated future growth in the archive market, Sony and Panasonic have been engaged in the joint development of a standard for professional-use next-generation optical discs.

http://www.sony.net/SonyInfo/News/Press/201403/14-0310E/index.html

What You Think You Know About the Web Is Wrong

If you’re an average reader, I’ve got your attention for 15 seconds, so here goes: We are getting a lot wrong about the web these days. We confuse what people have clicked on for what they’ve read. We mistake sharing for reading. We race towards new trends like native advertising without fixing what was wrong with the old ones and make the same mistakes all over again.
http://time.com/12933/what-you-think-you-know-about-the-web-is-wrong/

‘Seed libraries’ try to save the world’s plants

The circulating-library model might seem like a strange fit with gardening. When you check out books and DVDs, you’re supposed to bring them back so others can use them, but with seeds, there’s a strong chance nothing will come back at all. And, in a world where fruit and vegetable seeds are available for just a few dollars a packet, free seeds aren’t a pressing need most places.

http://www.bostonglobe.com/ideas/2014/03/09/seed-libraries-try-save-world-plants/XnM6HJ8GCfP...

S.F. library proposes new code of conduct with penalties

http://www.sfgate.com/bayarea/article/S-F-library-proposes-new-code-of-conduct-with-5300570.php

The mayor's letter to the commissioners proposed creating a Family and Education Fun Zone around the library and suggested that the first step should be instituting actual penalties for breaking the library's long-standing code of conduct. Previously, most bad behavior was met simply with a warning to stop.

In response, library staff beefed up the Patron Code of Conduct with much harsher penalties than the admonishment, "Uh, that's a sink - not a bathtub." Under the proposals, which will likely be tweaked after community input and voted on by the commissioners this spring, repeat offenses could result in being banned from all the city's public libraries for up to a year.

Anne Rice signs petition to protest bullying of authors on Amazon

Anne Rice has tackled vampires, werewolves and witches in her fiction, but now the bestselling novelist is taking on a real-life enemy: the anonymous "anti-author gangsters" who attack and threaten writers online.

http://www.theguardian.com/books/2014/mar/04/anne-rice-protests-bullying-amazon-petition

The Interview with the Vampire author is a signatory to a new petition, which is rapidly gathering steam, calling on Amazon to remove anonymity from its reviewers in order to prevent the "bullying and harassment" it says is rife on the site. "They've worked their way into the Amazon system as parasites, posting largely under pseudonyms, lecturing, bullying, seeking to discipline authors whom they see as their special prey," Rice told the Guardian. "They're all about power. They clearly organise, use multiple identities and brag about their ability to down vote an author's works if the author doesn't 'behave' as they dictate."

Here's The Petition

Library’s ‘shelfies’ put witty twist on social media photos

http://www.ohio.com/news/library-s-shelfies-put-witty-twist-on-social-media-photos-1.471428

What do you get when bookshelves pose for a picture?

A group shelfie, of course.

Go ahead and groan, but give the Akron-Summit County Public Library credit for a pretty good visual pun.

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