When It Comes To Presidential Libraries "Size Matters"

http://www.npr.org/2014/04/11/301749061/when-it-comes-to-presidential-libraries-size-matters

PRESIDENT GEORGE W. BUSH: Former presidents compare their libraries the way other men may compare their - well...

Where Are America’s Librarians? And Other Interesting Stats

http://fivethirtyeight.com/datalab/where-are-americas-librarians/

Rather than solely looking at change over time, it’s worth zooming in to a finer level of detail. For each metropolitan area, the BLS calculates a “job quotient,” which measures the number of librarians relative to population. On that basis, with 2.1 librarians for every 1,000 people, Owensboro, Ky., is the Silicon Valley of librarians.

Louisiana To Pick Official State Book. It's the King James Bible

The New Orleans Picayune reports on state legislators choice of an official state book.

Representative Thomas Carmody (R-Shreveport), originally filed a bill to declare a specific copy of a Bible, found in the Louisiana State Museum system, the official state book. But by the time he presented the proposal to the committee, he changed language in his legislation to make the generic King James version of the Bible, a text used worldwide, the official state book.

Michael Weil, who heads up the Jewish Federation of Greater New Orleans, said his organization -- which is cultural and not religious in nature -- hasn't take a stance on the bill. But the legislation gives him some personal pause. "I think the state should consider a text that is not religious," he said.

Another story on the same subject from NPR. And opinion from the ACLU: The bill "represents the use of religion to discriminate against Louisianians of minority faiths or who do not adhere to that particular book as part of their belief system. The bill will create more problems than it will solve by telling some Louisianians that their belief system is not full equal," the state ACLU says.

Chicago Public Library Unveils its New Website

What do you think of the new website ? Here's the old one.

You can comment below or on their Help Us Improve Our Website page.

Book News: What Are The World's Best New Novels? Libraries Weigh In

Book News on NPR

Inside the Metropolitan Opera's Library

Here's an insiders glimpse inside this special music library.

There is always more going on at the Metropolitan Opera House than meets the eye: wig fittings, dance rehearsals, orchestral rehearsals. One particularly busy corner of the Met can be found by descending two stories below the stage level to the music library. Met 2nd violinist Sarah Vonsattel recently visited the library and spoke with Chief Librarian Robert Sutherland and Assistant Librarian Melissa Robason.

When I ask Assistant Librarian Melissa Robason to describe a typical day at the Met, she laughs and replies, “I don’t think you can say there’s a ‘typical’ day, because every day is different and changing.” Chief Librarian Robert Sutherland adds, “The only thing that’s typical about any given day is that usually the day is clobbered by about 9:45am. Then we are just simply trying to stay alive and cover all the bases until about 3, at which point we tend to focus on what we really need to do, which is getting things ready for tonight, tomorrow, next week, next month, next season, the season after.”

Lurid Library Laughs

Even though it's not Friday, Tasha Saecker's Sites and Soundbytes blog has a small sample of some funny-bone crushing 1950's style dime novel covers with a library bent.

"I just can’t stop giggling at these fifties-style paperback covers converted to library humor. There are things here for everyone who has worked in a library."

The whole collection is here.

New Book: Visual Tour Of America's Most Fascinating Public Libraries

Via Fast Company: In 1994, photographer Robert Dawson began an odds-and-ends project. Whenever he traveled, he'd take pictures of public libraries. Then, a handful of years ago, he started taking trips across the United States just for the libraries--like the shed that served a one-person county in Nebraska, or the Texas library that housed a "petroleum room" with all sorts of George Bush-themed collectibles. He documented everything from a library found in a suburban strip mall to the the air-conditioned institution that functioned more like a refugee camp in sweltering Detroit July.

All told, Dawson journeyed through 48 states, fascinated and inspired by the common role libraries played in society. Libraries, he found, didn't only serve as a refuge for the poor who didn't have any place else to go, but gateways that opened up all corners of the world to anyone inquisitive enough to take a stroll among the shelves. The result is his new book: The Public Library, A Photographic Essay, published by Princeton Architectural Press. ISBN 978-1-61689-217-3. The book includes 150 photos, plus essays by Bill Moyers, Ann Patchett, Anne Lamott, Amy Tan, Barbara Kingsolver, and many more.

Nice slideshow on the author's website.

NPR Pulled a Brilliant April Fools' Prank On People Who Don't Read

NPR Pulled a Brilliant April Fools' Prank On People Who Don't Read

Story here.

Elementary School Libraries: Should They Open Over Summer Vacation?

From Boise, ID : The Idaho Commission for Libraries (ICfL) is working with Boise State University Literacy Professor Dr. Roger Stewart to research whether opening school libraries over the summer, along with using a “Book Fair” model of providing free books toward the end of the school year, can maintain or increase children’s literacy skills over the summer months.

The Commission will work with Horizon Elementary School in Jerome ID and its public library partners on a “full-court press” approach, providing $1,500 in funds for personnel to keep school libraries open as well as up to $9,000 in paperback books for all K-2 grade students. Three additional schools will try a “zone” approach, with the Commission providing $1,500 for personnel to keep those school libraries open during the summer, but without the additional books. All six schools serve populations where at least 60 percent of students come from low-income homes.

That Harvard Book Bound In Human Flesh Isn’t Actually Bound In Human Flesh

http://www.bostonmagazine.com/news/blog/2014/04/03/harvard-book-made-of-human-skin/
But unfortunately for the Internet, as the story started to regain traction officials from the school fleshed out the details of what really wraps at least some of the literature in their collection, and discovered it’s not human skin after all—it’s actually sheepskin. “Baaaaaad news for fans of anthropodermic bibliopegy (binding books in human skin): Recent analyses of a book owned by the [Harvard Law School] Library, long believed but never proven to have been bound in human skin, have conclusively established that the book was bound in sheepskin,” according to a post on the Harvard Library Law School’s blog, dated April 3.

Library book vending machine at George Eliot Hospital

The Warwickshire Libraries have installed a book vending machine at George Eliot Hospital. The following is a short video on how to use the machine. I think you will see several interesting things as you watch the video. In addition to seeing the technology used you also see how this service extends the reach of the library. I see numerous positive things in this video.

Interview with a Librarian for Incarcerated Youth

http://blog.leeandlow.com/2014/04/04/interview-with-a-librarian-for-incarcerated-youth/

Amy Cheney is a librarian and advocate who currently runs the Write to Read Juvenile Hall Literacy Program in Alameda County, CA. She has over 20 years experience with outreach, program design, and creation to serve the underserved, including middle school non-readers, adult literacy students, adult inmates in county and federal facilities, students in juvenile halls, non-traditional library users and people of color.

Cheney was named a Mover and Shaker by Library Journal, has won two National awards for her work, the I Love My Librarian award from the Carnegie Institution and New York Times, and was honored at the White House with a National Arts and Humanities Youth Program Award. Her six word memoir: Navigator of insanity, instigator of enlightenment. Her theme song is Short Skirt, Long Jacket by Cake.

Queens Library Board votes not to suspend big-spending director Thomas Galante

Queens Library Board votes not to suspend big-spending director Thomas Galante
Elected officials called for the library board to shelve Thomas Galante while city and federal investigations probe his eye-popping salary, luxury office renovations and undisclosed side job. Following a five-hour meeting, much of it behind closed doors, the library’s board voted 9-9 not to force him to take a leave of absence. The tie meant the motion to suspend did not carry.

Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/queens/panel-shelve-big-spending-library-director-articl...

Librarian Peenalized for his Peeculiar Behavior

So much for privacy, at Florida Atlantic University anyway.

When Seth Thompson was asked why he decided to shoot videos of men urinating in bathrooms at Florida Atlantic University, he told campus police he launched his strange hobby merely to see if he could get away with it. That personal challenge — coupled with his decision to post 13 of the videos on Internet porn sites — will cost the 40-year-old Lake Worth man a year of his life.

After struggling for nearly a week to decide the appropriate punishment for the man who worked at the Jaffe Center for Book Arts at FAU’s library, Palm Beach County Circuit Judge David Crow on Thursday sentenced Thompson to 364 days in the county jail.

As about 10 friends and family members looked on, silently weeping, Thompson was immediately slapped in handcuffs and taken to jail. He mouthed words of support to his backers as he struggled to hold back tears.

Thousands Of Artifacts Seized At 91-Year-Old Indiana Man's Home

Federal agents, art experts and museum curators descended on the home of a 91-year-old man in central Indiana on Wednesday to take control of a huge collection of artifacts from Native American, Russian, Chinese and other cultures.

Story at NPR

South Carolina librarians could be doubling as bouncers

http://chronicle.augusta.com/latest-news/2014-04-02/sc-librries-get-tough

Lawmakers are moving forward with an effort to create a tougher legal environment for unwelcome library visitors. On Tuesday, the Senate Judiciary Committee voted 19-0 to advance S. 813, which says someone who refuses to leave a public library after previously being warned is guilty of a misdemeanor.

“I’m very concerned about the safety and the operation of our public library system,” said Sen. Marlon Kimpson, D-Charleston.

“Having said that, I’m also concerned that the public has the right to use to library.”

SU Libraries Hosts First Human Library Event

http://news.syr.edu/su-libraries-hosts-first-human-library-event-83601/

The Syracuse University Libraries, in partnership with the School of Information Studies and the Office of Multicultural Affairs, will host its first Human Library on Wednesday, April 9, from 3-6 p.m. in Bird Library. In the Human Library, the books you sign out are real people from the SU campus community representing a variety of cultural backgrounds, areas of expertise and life experiences. The event is intended to encourage diversity and challenge stereotypes and prejudices.

Yum? It's Edible Books Day

Books 2 Eat reminds us that the International Edible Book Festival is held annually "around April 1st". To our knowledge, the following countries have held this festival: Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, China, England, France, Germany, Hong Kong, India, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Luxemburg, Mexico, Morocco, Netherlands, New Zealand, United States of America, Romania, Russia, Singapore, Sweden.

April 1st is the birthday of French gastronome Jean-Anthelme Brillat-Savarin (1755-1826), famous for his book Physiologie du goût, a witty meditation on food. April fools' day is also the perfect day to eat your words and play with them as the "books" are consumed on the day of the event. This ephemeral global banquet, in which anyone can participate, is shared by all on the internet and allows everyone to preserve and discover unique bookish nourishments.

Also, the website needs a webmaster. Anyone game? (or beefy or fishy) enough to sign up?

Sharing Economy: Seed Libraries Open all over the Country

Sharing Economy: Seed Libraries Open all over the Country
https://nonprofitquarterly.org/policysocial-context/23929-sharing-economy-seed-libraries-ope...
These efforts appear to be popping up all over the country. In Cleveland, for instance, the Public Library has four branches participating in its seed library effort; in Fairfield, Connecticut, the Seed to Seed Library is in its fourth year. This article discusses some of the benefits of these kinds of exchanges.

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