Small bomb damages library book drop in Iowa

YIKES!
The Wapello County Sheriff's Office is investigating the explosion of small bomb in a library book drop in the small southeast Iowa community of Blakesburg.

Librarian Rebecca Brittain says the ``homemade bomb'' was found in the Blakesburg Public Library's book drop on Wednesday morning.

Wapello County Chief Deputy Don Phillips says the explosion was caused by a chemical reaction inside a Gatorade bottle.

Today’s Computer Commons is Tomorrow’s Card Catalog

http://acrlog.org/2013/07/29/todays-computer-commons-is-tomorrows-card-catalog/
Perhaps the best thing we can do, in planning for onsite library computing today, is to aim for maximum flexibility. Students may express a demand for desktops today, but it’s hard to imagine that will be our future. When we gaze out upon our fields of computers we should, in our mind’s eye, envisions it as a room that holds nothing but an enormous, as far-as-the-eye-can see card catalog. Because, ultimately, as the next generations of students make it to our doors, it is less likely they will expect us to provide them with computers, and it may be that they would consider such amenities laughable and a waste of their tuition dollars. It is a bit premature perhaps, but not unreasonable, for us to begin thinking about how we will use all the space currently devoted to desktop and laptop-loan computers. My crystal ball is less clear on this matter, although I suspect we can always improve things by expanding the café.

An Unexpected Price War Is Making Amazon Book Prices Lower Than Ever

Amazon appears to have slashed the prices of its books, thanks to an Overstock.com promo in which it priced all of its books at least 10 percent below Amazon.

The aggressive pricing strategy has been enough to see Bezos & Co. cut the prices of hardcover book by between 50 percent and 65 percent compared to the usual cover price. Those kinds of discounts have never been seen on Amazon before; typically, it knocks around 40 to 50 percent off as a maximum.
http://gizmodo.com/an-unexpected-price-war-is-making-amazon-book-prices-lo-948777676

Digital Repositories workshop at the NYLA Annual Conference

Digital Repositories workshop at the NYLA Annual Conference, Wednesday, September 25, 2013, Niagara Falls, NY

Sponsor: Academic and Special Libraries Section
Half Day PM Program 2:00 PM – 5:00 PM
This workshop addresses key issues surrounding the creation, maintenance, and cultivation of digital repositories. Drawing on the latest literature, case studies, and personal experiences, speakers lead a discussion that covers planning the digital repository, selecting a methodology for its establishment, populating it with content, marketing it to the library's constituencies, and meeting the various challenges and questions along the way. Participants have the opportunity to bring their own experiences to bear, as well as engage in group discussions regarding how to get the most out of a digital repository.

Presenters:
Jim DelRosso is the Digital Projects Coordinator for Cornell University's Hospitality, Labor, and Management Library, where he is responsible for such projects as DigitalCommons@ILR, the digital repository for Cornell's ILR School. A digital librarian since 2009, Jim is also the President for the Upstate New York Chapter of the Special Libraries Association, and has served as the Communication & Social Media Chair for the SLA's Academic Division.

Amy Buckland is the eScholarship, ePublishing & Digitization Coordinator at McGill University Library, where she is responsible for scholarly communication, publishing initiatives, and making rare items from special collections available to the world through digitization. She loves information almost as much as Fluevog shoes, and thinks academic libraryland is ripe for a revolution. You can find her online at informingthoughts.com and in most social networks as Jambina. -- Read More

Librarian / Wikipedia t-shirt

T-shirt that references Wikipedia citations that I think many librarians will enjoy.

Content owners warn Congress of "fair use creep" draw ridicule

Groups representing the movie, music and photography industry testified before Congress on Thursday, and called on the government to consider changing laws to do more to address piracy and file-sharing.

The testimony, which took place before the House Judiciary Subcommittee on Intellectual Property, is part of a larger review by Congress of America’s copyright policy. The review is significant because it will help shape the rules for culture and creativity on the internet in coming decades.

http://gigaom.com/2013/07/26/content-owners-warn-congress-of-fair-use-creep-draw-ridicule/

The Onion Declares Print Dead At 1,803

Sources close to print, the method of applying ink to paper in order to convey information to a mass audience, have confirmed that the declining medium passed away early Thursday morning.

The influential means of communication was 1,803.

Print, which had for nearly two millennia worked tirelessly to spread knowledge around the globe in the form of books, newspapers, magazines, pamphlets, and numerous other textual materials, reportedly succumbed to its long battle with ill health, leaving behind legions of readers who had for years benefited from the dissemination of ideas made possible by the advent of printed materials.

Fourth quadrant: Librarians?

Pop-Up Library Serves The Needs Of Book Worms On The Beach

Pop-Up Library Serves The Needs Of Book Worms On The Beach
Beaches are usually loaded with ice cream stands, bars for cold drinks and parasol rental services, but buying or renting a book on the beach can be though. To fill this gap, French architect Matali Crasset came up with this pop-up beach library. The simple structure, that consists of tarpaulin draped over a steel frame, offers beach-goers a collection of over 350 books that are selected by Crasset herself.

Read more

How Google Rediscovered the 19th Century

When we read the past, we acknowledge that we stand not only, as Isaac Newton put it, on the shoulders of giants, but also on those of scholars of smaller stature who were no less passionate about their subjects and determined in their own way to contribute to the intellectual conversation. The 12th-century philosopher and educator Bernard of Chartres is said to have observed that we are all dwarfs when we attempt to climb atop gargantuan flesh. I am glad to have met more of them online, and to have profited from their vantage point.

History Group Slams Open Access

In a stunning demonstration of Poe's law, the American Historical Association has released a policy statement favoring the restriction digital theses ("with access being provided only on that campus") for fears that open access versions could be read. The basis for this argument is FUD about a tenure system that apparently cannot be changed. See Inside Higher Ed and The Chronicle for more coverage.

Say Goodbye to the Tech Sounds You’ll Never Hear Again

The Typewriter
Skipping CDs
The Payphone
The CRT Television
Blowing on a Nintendo Cartridge
The Telephone Slam
The Modem
The Dot Matrix Printer
Tape Hiss
Advancing Film in a Camera
Friction-Shifting a Bike
http://www.wired.com/gadgetlab/2013/07/tech-sounds/?viewall=true

We Need To Rethink The Web Because of Ads and Apps

A really interesting read from Matthew Butterick: The Bomb in the Garden: "Because a lot of you, maybe most of you, are going to spend most of your design career putting things on screen, and on the web. Not on paper. So again, going back to my first point—my major point today is that I hope you feel invested in this struggle, because whatever happens, it’s going to affect you for a long time. As I said at the beginning—designers have always been vital to the web, in terms of exploring its capabilities and sharing those possibilities."

It's about design and ads and apps and money, but if you live on the web, it's worth the read. The quote that caught me:

"" But we’re ready to take off the training wheels. And now that the web has competition, we really have no choice. The costs of delay are getting more severe. Think about those ads popping up for apps—“use this, instead of using the web.”"

Hoopla wants to be a free Netflix for library users

Hoopla wants to be a free Netflix for library users:
Hoopla, a new streaming service for libraries, lets patrons borrow digital movies, TV shows, audiobooks and music. The selection isn’t comparable to Netflix, but it is free if you have a card at participating library. Hoopla is based in Holland, Ohio, and is owned by library distributor Midwest Tape.
https://www.hoopladigital.com/

Books Stolen by Librarian Who Committed Suicide Return to Sweden

Two rare volumes stolen by an employee from Sweden’s Royal Library will be returned today in New York after the antique book seller in Baltimore who purchased them agreed to hand them over to the FBI.

The chief of the Royal Library’s Manuscript Department, Anders Burius, stole at least 56 rare or one-of-a-kind books in his 10 years of employment, the U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York said in a statement stamped July 17. The books to be returned “contain early depictions of the United States by explorers,” the attorney’s office said.

http://www.businessweek.com/news/2013-07-24/books-stolen-by-librarian-who-committed-suicide-...

Wall to separate west Windsor library from school due to security risks

A wall will be built to permanently divide Windsor’s west end library due to the security concerns of its neighbouring elementary school.

The Windsor Public Library board accepted the public school board’s decision on Tuesday.

“This is not the ideal solution, but we understand that safety is a primary concern for parents and the school board,” said Chris Woodrow, the library’s acting CEO.

http://blogs.windsorstar.com/2013/07/23/wall-to-separate-west-windsor-library-from-school-du...

Man Returns Library Book 41 Years Late And Pays $300 Fine

Library book 41 years overdue is finally returned to the Champaign County Library. The library received $299.30 in cash and a handwritten note that read:

"To Champaign County Library: Sorry I've kept this book so long, but I'm a really slow reader! I've enclosed my fine of $299.30 (41 years, 2 cents a day). Once again, my apologies."
http://www.wdtn.com/dpp/news/local/champaign/library-book-returned-41-years-overdue#.Ue_JLaH...

2013 LITA Forum registration open

Registration is available for the 2013 LITA National Forum, “Creation, Collaboration, Community,” held Nov. 7-10, 2013 at the Hyatt Regency Louisville, Ky. Visit the LITA Forum Web page to register.

Keynote Sessions anchor the event and include speakers Travis Good, Nate Hill and Emily Gore. On Friday Travis Good, contributing editor for MAKE Magazine, will kick off the Forum with the Opening General Session, “Making Maker Libraries.Saturday, Nate Hill, assistant director at the Chattanooga (Tenn.) Public Library will present the general session. Emily Gore, director for content at the Digital Public Library of America will close the Forum on Sunday with “The Digital Public Library of America: A Community Effort.”

More than 30 concurrent sessions and a dozen poster sessions will provide a wealth of practical information on a wide range of topics. Two preconference workshops will also be offered.  Starting Thursday afternoon and concluding Friday morning, Rosalyn Metz of Wheaton College will present “Managing ProjectsOr, I’m in charge, now what?” The session covers several aspects of project management, including planning, budgeting and implementing. Also spanning Thursday afternoon and Friday morning will be “IT Security for Librarians,” presented by Blake Carver of LISHost. This workshop will give in-depth coverage of ways to stay safe online, how to secure your browser, PC and other devices you and your patrons use every day, in addition to tackling common security myths, passwords and network security, as well as hardware and PC security. -- Read More

Top Books Derived from 11 "Top 100" Lists

This post has its roots in a post from /r/booklists which linked to a blog post about the "Top 10 Top 100 Book Lists". This post linked to 10+ "Top 100" book lists from sources such as TIME magazine, Entertainment Weekly, Modern Library, etc. They were all in such different formats, and such different ways of being presented that I wanted to amalgamate all of these into one master "list" in order to compare them (thirteen lists in total since I also added in the first 100 of the Reddit's 200 favorite books). I have since thrown this into a pdf file on Scribd if anyone is interested. My next step was to compare each of these and see what books are most recommended in top lists. I omitted two lists (100 most influential books ever written and 100 Major works of creative nonfiction) since there was VERY LITTLE overlap between the other lists which were primarily fiction. I made one giant list that combined 11 "Top 100" Book Lists. The complete table, again available as a PDF on Scribd lists all the books I'm the left hand column and all the lists along the top. An 'X' denotes that the book was included in that list regardless of position. The books are sorted vertically by the number of lists in which the book is included.

The key to cleaning up the internet is tackling the darknets, not letting censorship in by the back door

Simon Bisson
What the UK government should be concentrating on is an effort to break the financial ties that hold the darknets together. Finding who holds the purse strings is a complex task, but it's a technique that's been proven to work time and time again. And perhaps it should also be noted that it's an approach that's well within the capabilities of the powerful surveillance tools that government security agencies have put in place to monitor social connections and financial traffic online as part of their efforts to combat terrorism.

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