No Librarian, But Lawrence School Library Still In Use

Of all the school staff cuts announced last spring, the elimination of the Lawrence School’s librarian raised the largest public outcry. At the time, principal Mary W. Gans vowed she and her staff would devise a plan for keeping the library open for student use. “The library is not closing,” she said.

At the start of the school year, a solution was found in moving the in-school suspension assistant Angela T. Woodward into the library. The library is now Ms. Woodward’s office. She sits at the circulation desk while she manages school discipline paperwork and scheduling.

Ms. Woodward was trained in the library’s computer and catalogue system at the start of the year by the librarian from the Morse Pond School. She checks out books, hands out late notices, arranges display books and manages scheduling for teachers to bring classes in for research.

“It’s not ideal, because we don’t have a certified librarian,” Ms. Gans said. “But it’s working well. It’s open all day; kids are checking out books.”

http://www.capenews.net/falmouth/no-librarian-but-lawrence-school-library-still-in-use/artic...

The Doomsday Librarian Preparing Our Reading for the Apocalypse

The average internet user who happens upon Survivor Library, a collection of about 7,000 books in PDF format that teach people how to rebuild civilization after the proverbial Collapse, may think it’s just another fear mongering, doomsday prepper site.

“What happens AFTER the Solar Flare that destroys the electrical grid and all electronics?" asked the site's About Us page. "AFTER the other 90% of the population has died from starvation, dehydration and disease. AFTER the roving gangs and raiders are eliminated and local communities form to provide security and relative peace. What Then?”

It’s easy to imagine that people who use this site are the ones that have homemade bunkers and have stocked enough canned goods to feed a family for weeks. But Survivor Library’s founder and administrator, who calls himself “The Librarian,” doesn’t identify himself that way.

http://motherboard.vice.com/read/survivor-library

Now on View at the Library of Congress, One of the Four Surviving Copies of the Magna Carta

Via the Washington Post: A yellowing piece of parchment covered in Latin, the Magna Carta now on view at the Library of Congress is as charming as a tax form. Hey, no one ever said cornerstones of constitutional law and civil liberty had to be pretty.

Magna Carta (experts drop the preceding “the”) got off to a rough start. When King John signed the “Great Charter” in 1215, on a field near London, he had no intention of appeasing its authors, barons who chafed at too-high taxes. But because they’d captured London, the king had no choice, says Nathan Dorn, curator of “Magna Carta: Muse and Mentor,” a new exhibit at the Library of Congress.

The barons made at least 41 copies and sent them to every county in England. The document on view is one of four surviving copies; the original is lost.

Picking The Locks: Redefining Copyright Law In The Digital Age

Information wants to be free. At least that's what Internet activists and many consumers say in support of free online content.

But when we stream a new film online or listen to music on Spotify, we don't always consider — or care about — the artists who are losing out.

The debates over intellectual property, copyright and traditional ideas of enforcement have been hot topics of late. The fall of Napster in the late '90s and the current battle between publisher Hachette and Amazon show that copyright law needs to be rewritten to fit digital standards.

In his new book, Information Doesn't Want To Be Free: Laws For The Internet Age, author Cory Doctorow argues that creators can make money even when their content is available online free of charge. For creators to succeed in the digital age, he says, copyright law must be reformed to reflect an age in which tech platforms control content.

Full piece here: http://www.npr.org/2014/11/03/360196476/picking-the-locks-redefining-copyright-law-in-the-di...

Note: In addition to additional text there is a 7 minute audio piece at the NPR site.

Product placement in ebooks?

Sweet 'N Low has sponsored an ebook. The sugar substitute has been worked into the story line in a few places.

More details here.

Roger Ebert's 4 Star Movie Guide and Serendipity

A post on found books, serendipity, and Roger Ebert.

Seattle Sorts Library Books Faster than New York? Fuhgeddaboudit

In the fourth annual “battle of the book sorters,” the giant mechanical sorter shared by the New York Public Library and the Brooklyn Public Library sorted 12,570 items in an hour, while a similar behemoth belonging to the King County Library System in Washington state sorted a mere 11,868.

Full article: http://artsbeat.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/10/29/seattle-sorts-library-books...

The Architecture of American Literacy

Article from CityLab about Washington, DC's Spy Library proposed additions to the classic Carnegie Library. The request however was denied by District preservationists.

Across the nation, the libraries that Andrew Carnegie built have been transformed and reused as historical museums, city halls, art centers, and even bars and restaurants, sometimes by dramatic means.

It is a testament to Carnegie's philanthropic investment in cities—the largest in U.S. history—that so many of these buildings are still in use. Yet no one can say exactly how many are standing now.

"As far as I'm aware, the last person to conduct an inventory of Carnegie libraries was Theodore Jones, back in 1997," says Ron Sexton, librarian for the Carnegie Corporation of New York. Almost 20 years later, Jones's book, Carnegie Libraries Across America: A Public Legacy, still offers the best estimate to a question that may not have an exact answer.

Two Important Publishing Facts Everyone Gets Wrong

Two Important Publishing Facts Everyone Gets Wrong

October 27th, 2014 | Hugh C. Howey

Almost everything being said about publishing today is predicated on two facts that are dead wrong. The first is that publishers are somehow being hurt by ebook sales. The second is that independent bookstores are being crushed. The opposite is true in both cases, and without understanding this, most of what everyone says about publishing is complete bollocks.

Full post here: http://www.hughhowey.com/two-important-publishing-facts-everyone-gets-wr...

Example infographic from post:

Is the College Model Ripe for Disruption?

With the rising costs of mounting student debt, education innovators are exploring ways to change the traditional college system. What might college 2.0 look like? WSJ's Jason Bellini has #TheShortAnswer.

Redefining What Discovery Means | Peer to Peer Review

A recent Ithaka report by Roger Schonfeld asks “Does Discovery Still Happen in the Library?” My immediate thought was “did it ever?” quickly followed by “why do we assume it should?”

http://lj.libraryjournal.com/2014/10/opinion/peer-to-peer-review/redefining-what-discovery-m...

A Library Battle in the Cornhusker State

There’s a fight brewing in Omaha, Nebraska of all places. I say “of all places” because from a distance Omaha seems like a calm place. Maybe it’s all those Mutual of Omaha commercials I saw as a child. Omaha is reassuring.

Nevertheless, the mayor is fighting against the library of all places. I say “of all places” because who fights against the library? Do they ever win?

The mayor wants the library to give out the names and addresses of patrons to the police when they ask, which current policy in Omaha and most other public libraries doesn’t allow.

Full post here. (Annoyed Librarian)

Azar Nafisi views American society through its literature

Letter: Make Park Ridge library users pay for the use of the library

Opinion piece in newspaper. Interesting to see the thought process of the public.

Excerpt: I say vote NO on the Park Ridge Public Library referendum!

I counted 28 computers at the library (some may have been for reference data) and not all were in use. To top it off, the library has already purchased iPads with games for use by children. When did the library become a teaching source? That’s what the schools are supposed to do.

Full letter:
http://parkridge.suntimes.com/2014/10/23/letter-make-park-ridge-library-users-pay-use-library/

Woman charged for torching books at Tacoma library

A Tacoma woman is in jail, accused of trying to set a library on fire. It happened on a busy Saturday at the Tacoma Main Library, forcing about 250 people to evacuate.

Library workers don't believe the motive was political. According to court documents, Sailly admitted she had an issue with a library worker earlier in the day and admitted to wanting to burn down the library.

http://www.king5.com/story/news/local/tacoma/2014/10/20/arson-tacoma-public-library/17642481/

Westerville Library Employee Accused of Stealing $20K

WESTERVILLE, Ohio - The deputy fiscal officer of the Westerville Public Library is being accused of embezzling funds.

Continued here:
http://www.10tv.com/content/stories/2014/10/23/westerville-ohio-westerville-library-employee...

Halloween book return

Book return decorated for Halloween at a Omaha Public Library branch.

Blog post about Amazon hiding nonfiction books

Excerpt: The problem with Amazon’s market share isn’t just commercial, it is political. It is a legitimate topic of public concern. If Hachette chooses not to publish a book, even for political reasons, there are four other mammoth publishers and hundreds if not thousands of others that can bring it to the public. If Amazon chooses to bury a title, half the book buyers will not see it when they’re shopping for books. In my opinion, that’s not good for our democracy. I think this is a much more important question than how the pie is divided among author, publisher, and retailer.

http://www.idealog.com/blog/krugman-cites-fact-fit-posited-theory/

Side note: If you are worried about Amazon censoring books be aware they are censoring monster erotica. Link to "On the Media" radio piece about this: http://www.onthemedia.org/story/amazons-war-bigfoot-erotica/

Intertwingled: Information Changes Everything


Intertwingled: Information Changes Everything
This is a book about everything. Or, to be precise, it explores how everything is connected from code to culture. We think we’re designing software, services, and experiences, but we're not. We are intervening in ecosystems. Until we open our minds, we will forever repeat our mistakes. In this spirited tour of information architecture and systems thinking, Peter Morville connects the dots between authority, Buddhism, classification, synesthesia, quantum entanglement, and volleyball. In 1974 when Ted Nelson wrote "everything is deeply intertwingled," he hoped we might realize the true potential of hypertext and cognition. This book follows naturally from that.

Reviews of the book at Goodreads

Amazon strikes deal with Simon & Schuster on e-book prices

Online book retailer Amazon.com Inc (AMZN.O) said on Monday it has signed a multi-year deal with Simon & Schuster Inc, the second Big-Five book publisher, on the future price of e-books.

Amazon, which had been in talks with Simon & Schuster since July over pricing, confirmed the deal first reported by the Business Insider news blog that the two had reached an agreement.

http://in.reuters.com/article/2014/10/21/us-amazon-com-deals-idINKCN0I92A520141021

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