Book Mobiles

Librarian Laurence Copel Earns Lemony Snicket 'Noble Librarians' Recognition

Laurence Copel, youth outreach librarian and founder of the Lower Ninth Ward Street Library in New Orleans, is the inaugural recipient of the Lemony Snicket Prize for Noble Librarians Faced with Adversity. On June 29, Daniel Handler (aka Lemony Snicket) will present her with a $3,000 check, $1,000 travel expenses, a certificate and "an odd object from Handler's private collection" during the American Library Association's Conference & Exhibition in Las Vegas.

"Copel is recognized for her extraordinary efforts to provide books to young readers of the Ninth Ward," said ALA president Barbara Stripling, adding that she "is a brilliant example of how librarians can serve as change agents. Her leadership and commitment show the vital role that librarians and libraries play in energizing and engaging the communities that they serve."

Known to the children in the Lower Ninth Ward as the Book Lady, Copel moved to New Orleans from New York City in 2010 and opened a library in her home through self-funding and small donations while living on $350 a week. She also converted her bicycle to a mobile book carrier allowing her to reach children and families that could not travel to her home. Story via Shelf-Awareness.com.

Once Forbidden, Books Become A Lifeline For A Young Migrant Worker

Growing up moving from farm to farm, Storm Reyes had to pack light. That meant no books. She felt hopeless about the future, until a bookmobile appeared in the fields and changed her life.

storycorps piece at NPR

Historical Photos of Early Bookmobiles

from Laughing Squid.

Here's a real oldie via Bennington College's Crossett Library:

Books on Bikes Attract Seattle Millenials

From NPR, a new program to deliver books to Seattlites via bike.

By the loading dock of Seattle's downtown library, librarian Jared Mills checks his tire pressure, secures his iPads and locks down about 100 books to an aluminum trailer the size of a steamer trunk. The scene is reminiscent of something you'd see in an action movie, when the hero is gearing up for a big fight, but Mills is gearing up for something very different.

"If you're not prepared and don't have a lot of experience hauling a trailer, it can be kind of dangerous," Mills says, especially when you're going downhill. "The trailer can hold up to 500 pounds."

Mills is part of Seattle Public Library's Books on Bikes program, which aims to keep the library nimble and relevant by sending librarians and their bicycles to popular community events around Seattle.

After a hilly, 5-mile bike ride to a local farmers market, Mills sets up shop among the fruit and vegetable booths. The bright orange trailer is custom-made with bookshelves and an umbrella holder (it is Seattle, after all).

Malena Harrang, in her early 20s, is visiting the market with a friend. She says Mills' book station is "like [a] carbon-neutral library on wheels — doesn't get better than that."

Food trucks inspire mobile bookstore

Combine a bookmobile with a food truck and what do you get? The Penguin Book Truck — and for good measure, the Penguin Book Pushcart.

By combining the concepts of bookmobile and food truck, book-publisher Penguin Group (USA) recently introduced its first mobile bookstore. And just like a good book, there’s a bonus inside: the Penguin Book Pushcart, which rolls out of the truck and down a ramp to make books even more accessible.

From The Detroit News: http://www.detroitnews.com/article/20130711/AUTO03/307110040

The Billy Pilgrim Traveling Library Goes West

Recently, the Houston-based Billy Pilgrim Traveling Library (previously) traveled to Odessa to debut the bookmobile-for-hire component of its services, and to help the Ector County Library celebrate its 75th anniversary.  This blog post details the different stops they made on their two-day trip and provides some analysis on the successes and shortcomings of the venture.

Rural WASHINGTON library patrons lose bookmobile, replace it with express branch

"I was concerned that there wasn't going to be any library service," said Kysar, who lives in Yacolt. "I called to see what the plan was, and there wasn't any plan."

At the same time Kysar was talking to representatives from the library district, other community members began talking to Jeff Carothers, then a mayoral candidate and now mayor, about opening a library branch in the rural community just north of Battle Ground, which reported a population of 1,556 in the 2010 census.

[That's Washington, NOT Oregon...oops]

Reinventing the bookmobile in Texas with The Billy Pilgrim Traveling Library

The Billy Pilgrim Traveling Library is a Houston-area bookmobile created by two recent library school graduates, hitting the streets in 2013. It will be a traveling library built from personal libraries and donations, based on a rent/barter/trade system AND a physical resource maintained by professionals that is open to partnerships and collaborations with organizations like schools, libraries, museums, nonprofits, and local artists.

For more information and ways to get involved, check out the Boing Boing Library Lab write-up, the BTPL IndieGoGo campaign, the BPTL's blog, and the BPTL's social channels (@thebptl on Twitter and fb.me/theBPTL on Facebook).

School Bus Driver Honored for creating a "Library on Wheels"

Books on board - Learning in progress! That's the mantra of one Prince William County school bus driver who turned the bus into a "library on wheels." Ric Clark was voted the "Education Support Professional of the Year by the Virginia Education Association for his efforts in creating a learning and interactive experience for kids.

Book Bus is driven by literacy

Book-loving Tampa, Fla., resident Jennifer Frances stopped at locations in Buffalo on Tuesday to read aloud to children and distribute free books to kids ranging in age from babies to teenagers.

"Bess the Book Bus" a literacy-themed volunteer project that Frances began in Florida 10 years ago, made its second stop in Western New York this week, after a first visit to the region last year.

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