Library Of Congress

Former Library of Congress Auditor Says He was Fired for Being Gay

From The Washington Post: Peter TerVeer was an up-and-coming auditor for the Library of Congress’s inspector general’s office. His boss liked him so much he tried to set him up with his single daughter, TerVeer says.

But when the boss discovered TerVeer was gay after learning from his daughter TerVeer “Liked” a Facebook page for same-sex parents, the supervisor harassed him with religious-based homophobia — and eventually got him fired, TerVeer alleges in a federal lawsuit.

The lawsuit, filed Aug. 3 in U.S. District Court in Washington, claims that TerVeer, 30, suffered discrimination based on sex stereotyping and his religious beliefs in violation of Title VII of the U.S. Civil Rights Act.

It charges that TerVeer was subjected to a hostile work environment for more than a year by his supervisor, John Mech, who quoted biblical passages to him condemning homosexuality.

Additional details in The Washington Blade.

Unknown Civil War Soldier Portrait at LOC Identified

His face has been printed in books and used in films, but for decades, no one knew the name of the fierce-eyed Civil War soldier in the portrait, known only as “unidentified.”


But a chance encounter between an avid Civil War photography collector and Villa Rica, Ga., resident Patricia Mullinax at last allowed the Library of Congress, which has the portrait, to identify her great-great grandfather, Stephen Pollard.

Pollard was a Confederate soldier from Georgia with a thin moustache, wearing an old-fashioned tie, with a brace of pistols in his belt and an 1855 muzzle-loading pistol, with stock, in his two hands, according to the Washington Post. The young soldier went on to survive the Civil War — and eventually have his image featured in Ken Burns’s famous film on the conflict, becoming famous, but still unknown.

Seth MacFarlane Donates Boxes of Carl Sagan's Papers to the Library of Congress

From the article:

The creator of the hit animated series "Family Guy" has donated a vast trove of the late astronomer Carl Sagan's papers to the Library of Congress, officials announced today (June 27).

Writer, producer and director Seth MacFarlane gave the U.S. Library of Congress — the largest library in the world — about 800 boxes of material documenting Sagan's life and work. The papers include book drafts, "idea files" on various subjects and Sagan's extensive correspondence.

More from Space.com.

Library of Congress Digital Library Pioneer Retiring: Laura Campbell

Digital Preservation Pioneer: Laura Campbell

June 14th, 2012 by Mike Ashenfelder

Twenty years ago, Dr. James Billington hired Laura Campbell to join the Library of Congress as director of Library Distribution Services. Through Campbell’s previous consultation work with the Library, he recognized her great talent.

http://blogs.loc.gov/digitalpreservation/2012/06/digital-preservation-pioneer-laura-campbell/

New Poet Laureate Appointed At LC

The Office of Communications at the Library of Congress announced that Mississippi Poet Laureate Natasha Trethewey was named 19th US Poet Laureate. Trethwey will hold the positions concurrently. Poets.org has a profile posted of the new appointee. Huffington Post and the New York Times have more on the appointment as well.

Waste charges rattle Library of Congress

Management at the Library of Congress, the world’s largest storehouse of knowledge, has a poor memory. For a decade, problems of overspending, no-bid contracts, and improper care for some of mankind’s rarest books and artifacts have been brought to upper-level attention—but problems have only worsened.

For more see http://www.govexec.com/contracting/2012/06/waste-charges-rattle-library-congress/56163/?oref...

Interested in an Internship at Library of Congress This Summer?

Here's an opportunity for talented college-age students headed for the field of LIS:

This summer the Library of Congress once again is offering special 10-week paid internships to college students. For a stipend of $3,000, the 2011 class of Junior Fellows Summer Interns will work full-time from May 29 through Aug. 3, 2012, with Library specialists and curators to inventory, describe and explore collection holdings and to assist with digital-preservation outreach activities throughout the Library.

In addition to the stipend (paid in bi-weekly segments), interns will be eligible to take part in programs offered at the Library. Applications will be accepted online only at usajobs.gov , keyword: 308129000, from Friday, Jan. 27 through midnight, Monday, Feb. 27. For more details about the program and information on how to apply, visit www.loc.gov/hr/jrfellows/. Questions about the program may be sent to interns2012@loc.gov.

The Library of Congress is an equal-opportunity employer. Women, minorities and persons with disabilities who meet eligibility requirements are strongly encouraged to apply. [ed. note: not positive about transgendered individuals, see previous story on LISNews.] -- Read More

Henry Rollins Speaks On His Consciousness-Expanding Trip to the Library of Congress

Henry Rollins Speaks On His Consciousness-Expanding Trip to the Library of Congress
Yes, THAT Henry Rollins. Like Kendra Said "It's like every old school hardcore kid turned librarian's wet dream".

"I know that collector types can be a pain in the neck and seem perpetually frozen in time -- or at least in their parents' basement -- but someone has to look out for the past, lest it slip away forever. It was amazing to be around people who are dedicated to making sure there is a trail, who work with painstaking care to maintain the integrity of what came before. I was told I was doing the right thing by diligently saving fliers in acid-free protectors and transferring my analog sources to digital, and to keep up the good work."

Librarian of Congress has no Plans to Retire

How many government employees in Washington have been there since the Reagan years? Not too many, but one of them is James Billington, Librarian of Congress.

He moves a little more slowly now, at 82, and gets more questions about whether he’s thinking of retiring, but that seems to be the last thing on James Billington’s mind as he begins his 25th year as the Librarian of Congress (however, he is not credentialed as a librarian).

“I have no plans at this point — sorry to disappoint you,” a reflective Billington said during an hourlong interview with The Hill. “The Lord’s been very kind, and I’m in the middle of a lot of interesting things. And of course, it’s a time when all cultural institutions are facing lots of challenges.”

Billington, who was sworn in as the 13th Librarian of Congress on Sept. 14, 1987, outlined some of those challenges when asked about the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11th terrorist attacks, given that the Library was the first to publish Osama bin Laden’s autobiography and the first to discover papers that raised concerns about terrorists hijacking airliners.

“Speaking as an American, like all other Americans I share in the horror and outrage and the deep concern and expressions of sympathy, and in the way in which the country was suddenly conscious of fragility when we all thought we were secure,” he said. -- Read More

Earthquake Shakes Up the East Coast

Did you feel it? Any books fall off the shelves? A 5.9-Magnitude (corrected to 5.8) earthquake struck the Eastern US shortly before 2:00 pm EST, centered in Virginia, but it was felt from the Carolinas to Toronto. Lots of libraries and other buildings were evacuated (some on Wall Street in NYC); here's a story from Spartanburg County, SC:

Spartanburg County Emergency Management Coordinator Doug Bryson was attending a state emergency managers’ meeting in Columbia discussing Hurricane Irene when the room began shaking. “It was a weird feeling,” Bryson said. “The floor and chairs were all shaking. Apparently, it’s affected the whole East Coast.” Bryson said he began getting calls about the quake but had not heard of any damage so far in Spartanburg County. The quake shook the shelves at the Spartanburg County Headquarters Library, which was briefly evacuated.

More reports from Patchogue NY, the campus of Virginia Tech in Blacksburg VA, and the Nation's Capital, where the Library of Congress was evacuated.

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