Library 2.0

1TB of free online media storage via Oosah

Need someplace to store the massive number of pictures, videos, and other media files that have accumulated on your computer? You can always use a service like Flickr or YouTube, but wouldn't it be nice to have it all in one place? A relatively new player in the media storage game, Oosah, offers 1TB for media storage. Yes, 1TB. Here's the limits on what you can upload:

There are some limitations. You can only upload videos that are 200MB or smaller, images that are 50MB or less, and MP3 files that are 9MB or less. And you can't upload executable files, office documents, or other files.

Here is a word of warning from DownloadSquad though (the above limits also came from DownloadSquad):

One word of warning. When I signed up I had to check a box that said I agreed to Oosah's privacy policy. But there was no clear link to said policy. A quick Google search turned up a list of terms and conditions which also makes mention of a separate privacy policy. But it's nowhere to be found.

Jimmy Wales Interview on Open Licenses

Ellyssa Kroski, who writes at iLibrarian, also teaches a class at San Jose State University on the Open Movement and Libraries (Fall of 2008). As part of the class shes has done interviews with such notable figures as Stephen Downes of the National Research Council in Canada, and Nicole Engard of LibLime. Her guest a couple weeks ago was Jimmy Wales. You can hear the full 10 minutes interview with Jimmy Wales here.

Learn a language from Busuu

There's another new language site out on the web, called Busuu. This one with a little bit of a twist in that it incorporates a social aspect to the site.

Via Lifehacker here's a brief bit of info about it:

Language education site Busuu emphasizes the social side of learning a language. While Busuu has standard components such as vocabulary exercises with audio and writing units to test out your composition, the most interesting aspect is its ability to connect you with both people learning your language and native speakers of your language. You're learning Spanish and someone else is learning English.

A quick look shows it is a relatively simple service and a good way to get an introduction to a new language. By no means is it comprehensive, but with the social aspect theres a chance to connect to others and go beyond the basics.

Best of the best free tools

Via Lifehacker:
A few months back Lifehacker started a section titled "Hive Five" that answers the most frequently asked question: "What's the best tool for the job?" The top tools are chosen by the users and here they present the best of the best from 26 different categories. Many, if not all, of the tools are free. Here is their best of the best.

Google Books now embeddable

Via Lifehacker Google Books are now embeddable on websites, just like YouTube videos! You can view an example here on Google Operating System posting.

The Back Nine Stacks

Jenny Levine takes a look a library fundraiser that raised $10,000 by putting a mini golf course in the stacks. She had the pleasure of talking with Rick Bolton, the guy behind the fundraiser, and learned that he’s taken his original idea and expanded on it to create a 501(c)(3) organization that can work with libraries across the country. The basic idea is that the Library Mini Golf nonprofit group will create a miniature golf course for a library, 80% of which is a standard course. The individual holes are created in such a way that they can be set up and taken down quickly, and they can be folded down for easy storage. LMG plans to work with college design school students to create the other, unique 20% of the course, which might include replicas of local buildings or other items of interest to the community.

Legally, should Libraries NOT be Using Flickr?

Dr. Stephens asks Legally, should Libraries NOT be Using Flickr? "There has to be some new middle ground - blanket photo permissions for public events at the library, posted notices that photos will be taken, etc. I am not well-versed in the law - and that’s why I do appreciate the issue this article addresses, but I need to understand this more and would love to hear from folks out there."

Library Innovation Requires Regularizing the Irregular

Eric Schnell: To move towards a move innovative organization requires experimentation, trial and error, doing new things, and breaking rules. Libraries looking to become more innovative are confronted with reality: it takes 100 crazy ideas to find 10 worth funding experimentally in order to identify 1 project worth pursuing. As it has been said, that it takes a lot of acorns to grow an oak tree.

The challenge is that most library organizations are structured and managed to continue current practices rather for than for innovation.

Free Webinar: Public Computers and 2.0 Tools (Sponsored by MaintainIT and WebJunction)

On September 17th, spend 30 minutes learning about Public Computers and 2.0 Tools. Join Robin Hastings, from the Missouri River Regional Library, as she shares the steps her library has taken to foster a 2.0 friendly environment at their library, both for staff and library users. By setting up a flexible computing environment and creating innovative learning opportunities, this creative professional has helped her community make the most of collaborative technologies. Take 30 minutes out of your day to learn from the experiences of others.

The MaintainIT Project tracks down good ideas so you don't have to reinvent the wheel! Access free articles, cookbooks and other resources to help support public access computing at: http://www.maintainitproject.org.

WHEN: September 17th, 11 AM (Pacific Time Zone)
WHERE: WebJunction's webinar space (Please register on WebJunction.org:

What does Cha Cha have that librarians don't?

On public radio's Marketplace program yesterday, I heard this story about ChaCha, a mobile research service that we've seen discussed here before: [1] [2] [3].

How can librarians compete with this service? Since many users seem to treat it as a joke, do we even need to? Discuss.

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