Publishing

Smarter Metadata — Aiding Discovery in Next Generation E-book and E-journal Gateways

From the Scholarly Kitchen Blog

With the recent surge in library e-book sales, serials aggregators are racing to add e-books to their platforms. ProQuest’s recent acquisition of ebrary and JSTOR’s expansion into current journals and e-books signal a shift from standalone e-book and e-journal aggregator platforms to mixed content gateways, with e-books and e-journals living cheek by jowl in the same aggregation..... Read more.

Tools of Change Conference

The (O'Reilly)Tools of Change in Publishing Conference is happening right now in New York; the event is sold out, but there are a lot of streaming events and sessions that you can take in on line, for example, the Future of e-books Technology and Copyright, Intellectual Property Rights, and Licensing Issues in the Digital Era. Check them out here.

Information technology and economic change: The impact of the printing press

Information technology and economic change: The impact of the printing press
Historians argue that the printing press was among the most revolutionary inventions in human history, responsible for a diffusion of knowledge and ideas, “dwarfing in scale anything which had occurred since the invention of writing” (Roberts 1996, p. 220). Yet economists have struggled to find any evidence of this information technology revolution in measures of aggregate productivity or per capita income (Clark 2001, Mokyr 2005). The historical data thus present us with a puzzle analogous to the famous Solow productivity paradox – that, until the mid-1990s, the data on macroeconomic productivity showed no effect of innovations in computer-based information technology.

Don't miss Figure 1. The diffusion of the printing press

What Scientists Think about Open Access Publishing

The SOAP (Study of Open Access Publishing) project has run a large-scale survey of the attitudes of researchers on, and the experiences with, open access publishing. Around forty thousands answers were collected across disciplines and around the world, showing an overwhelming support for the idea of open access, while highlighting funding and (perceived) quality as the main barriers to publishing in open access journals. This article serves as an introduction to the survey and presents this and other highlights from a preliminary analysis of the survey responses. To allow a maximal re-use of the information collected by this survey, the data are hereby released under a CC0 waiver, so to allow libraries, publishers, funding agencies and academics to further analyse risks and opportunities, drivers and barriers, in the transition to open access publishing.

More at arXiv.org.

Do libraries help or hurt publishing?

Do libraries help or hurt publishing?
With libraries around the world in such financial jeopardy, a couple of questions come to mind:
•What purpose (if any) has a library served for you?
•If libraries ceased to exist, what would the ramifications be?
•Do libraries help or hurt publishing?

The Mark Twain Controversy Continues, and Nancy Pearl Weighs In

As we've heard recently, in NewSouth Book's new edition of Huckleberry Finn, they will replace the "n-word" and "injun" with the word slave. More on the forthcoming edition from The New York Times.

Nancy Pearl, just named Librarian of the Year says "I think it's a mistake, because books are written at a particular time in history, and we need to read them with the knowledge that they're written at those times. This is the way the world was then, and this is the way the world is now, when that kind of language isn't acceptable."

Pearl told KIRO Radio's Frank Shiers that if readers are offended by the use of such language in the book they simply don't get it (below).


More audio at MyNorthwest.com

Translation as Literary Ambassador

Hoping to increase their tiny share of the American book market, foreign governments and foundations are plunging into the publishing fray in the United States.

Full article

How Publishers Are Tackling the App Question

At Publisher's Weekly

Are apps marketing devices for authors and books, or a new revenue stream? This is just one of many questions publishers are asking as they develop apps from their content. When PW approached large and midsize publishers to find out about their app programs, we discovered that many houses don't have "programs" per se. Questions loom about what content is best suited for apps—though overwhelmingly it seems that reference and children's are sweet spots—and how best to look at apps.

Full article

Rainforest Action Network Issues Guides to Forest-Friendly Books/Publishers

The Rainforest Action Network has issued a report and consumer guide aimed at encouraging holiday shoppers to buy children's books from publishers that have paper policies that commit them to phase out buying Indonesian paper and pulp from controversial suppliers.

Full article here

Postcards from Penguin: One Hundred Book Covers in One Box

Postcards from Penguin: One Hundred Book Covers in One Box

This is a collection of 100 postcards, each featuring a different and iconic Penguin book jacket. From classics to crime, here are over seventy years of quintessentially British design in one box. In 1935 Allen Lane stood on a platform at Exeter railway station, looking for a good book for the journey to London. His disappointment at the poor range of paperbacks on offer led him to found Penguin Books. The quality paperback had arrived. Declaring that 'good design is no more expensive than bad', Lane was adamant that his Penguin paperbacks should cost no more than a packet of cigarettes, but that they should always look distinctive. Ever since then, from their original - now world-famous - look featuring three bold horizontal stripes, through many different stylish, inventive and iconic cover designs, Penguin's paperback jackets have been a constantly evolving part of Britain's culture. And whether they're for classics, crime, reference or prize-winning novels, they still follow Allen Lane's original design mantra. Sometimes, you definitely should judge a book by its cover.

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