Publishing

A New World: Scheduling E-Books

Dan Brown’s fans have waited six long years for "The Lost Symbol",
his follow-up to the megablockbuster novel “The Da Vinci Code” that is being published in hardcover on Sept. 15.

Will those who want to read it in e-book form wait a little longer?

It is a question that Mr. Brown’s publisher, the Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, is weighing as it plans the rollout of what it hopes will be a book-selling sensation. The publisher has announced a first hardcover run of five million copies, but Suzanne Herz, a spokeswoman for Knopf Doubleday, said the publisher had not decided when to release an electronic version.

Article looks at how publishers are timing the release of their ebook editions so they don't cannibalize hardcover sales.

Full story in the NYT

How Book Publishing Is Changing...For the Better, or Not? {Bits of Destruction}

More on digitization etc.

"Bits of destruction" is a phrase Fred Wilson uses to describe the destructive part of "creative destruction" brought on by digitization. We hear a lot about the destruction wrought on the newspaper business. A more interesting and nuanced wave is now hitting the book publishing business. Actually, it is three waves: the digitization of back catalogs, e-books, and print on demand. However this plays out, a lot of people will be affected, but the way in which it will play out is not at all obvious.

His blog discusses 'the dragon' Amazon.com, POD, acceptance of e-books and how these and other technologies relate to the state of the industry.

Thanks to Peter Scott for the tip.

Reality changes more slowly than I like to think

Blog post by Mike Shatzkin, publishing industry consulatant:

I did a panel yesterday at NYU as part of the summer publishing program on “New Visions” for publishing. The group was put together by Leslie Schnur. I shared the stage with four very articulate co-presenters who gave very diverse views of the future. Our audience was a full room of about 50-100 (I wasn’t counting; I didn’t know I’d be writing this piece) very attentive 20-somethings with a serious interest in publishing.

Blog post continued here.

Science moves from the stacks to the Web; print too pricey

If information isn't online, it may as well not exist. In the latest sign that the world of traditional print has become a world of hurt, the American Chemical Society is reported to be planning to switch to an online-only publishing model for its journals.

This Is Your Country on Drugs

Interesting sounding book just out: This Is Your Country on Drugs: The Secret History of Getting High in America by Ryan Grim (Wiley, $24.95, 0470167394/9780470167397, June 29, 2009).

Book review by Debra Ginsberg from Shelf-Awareness who calls it "a truly compelling and enlightening read."

Salinger Wins as Judge Blocks Publication of 60 Years Later

NEWS FLASH! from Publishers Weekly.

HarperCollins Buys Series from James Frey

He submitted it anonymously.

But then HC found out the author of the Y.A. novel "I Am Number Four" was James Frey, the notorious author of “A Million Little Pieces”. Do you think that helped him get the contract?

Here's the story from the NYTimes.

A 'Restored' Edition of Hemingway's "A Moveable Feast" by His Grandson

What happens to a book published posthumously? It seems a life can be written, edited, rewritten and reedited long after the author's death.

This is what's transpiring with Hemingway's posthumous memoir of his early days in Paris, “A Moveable Feast." Along with portraits of other famous ex-pats (F. Scott Fitzgerald and Gertrude Stein), it provides a heart-wrenching depiction of marital betrayal.

Much married, Hemingway's fourth and final wife Mary was the one who edited the first edition of “A Moveable Feast,” published by Scribner in 1964 (she became his widow upon the authors death in July 1961). She created a final chapter that dealt with the dissolution of Hemingway’s first marriage to Hadley and the beginning of his relationship with his second wife, Pauline, building some of it from parts of the book he had indicated he did not want included.

Early next month, Scribner, now an imprint of Simon & Schuster, is publishing a new edition of the book, what it is calling “the restored edition,” and this time it is edited by Seán Hemingway, a grandson of Hemingway and Pauline. Among the changes he has made is removing part of that final chapter from the main body of the book and placing it in an appendix, adding back passages from Hemingway’s manuscript that Seán believes paint his grandmother in a more sympathetic light. -- Read More

They Publish Books and Give Them Away for Free

Not the Watchtower....but Concord Free Press, and yes, I guess they are getting a bit of free publicity from their endeavor. Check it out.

$25 offer a mistake, admits Reed Elsevier

Reed Elsevier officials have admitted that it was a mistake for the STM publisher's marketing division to offer $25 (£15) Amazon gift cards to anyone who would give a new textbook five stars in a review posted on Amazon or Barnes & Noble.

More here.

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