Blogging

New Site From Gary Price and Shirl Kennedy INFOdocket.com

This is Gary Price and Shirl Kennedy saying hello from Washington, DC and St. Petersburg, FL.
We have some news and a few URLs to share.

URL: http://INFOdocket.com/
Twitter: http://twitter.com/INFOdocket
RSS: http://infodocket.com/feed/

When we began ResourceShelf (just about a decade ago) and DocuTicker (two years later) our goal was, and has always been, to share info industry news, happenings in the library world, and supply a non-stop stream of new web-based resources to our loyal readers. Since we began, we've been very fortunate that so many of you have found what we do to be useful.

We would like to say thank you very much for your interest and support. We've also been happy to see that our websites are of interest to a wide variety of readers outside of the library community, including journalists and educators.

Today, we have a bit of news to share.

We (Gary and Shirl) are NO LONGER affiliated with ResourceShelf and DocuTicker. However, that doesn't mean it's time to say goodbye. Hardly. In fact, the same spirit that has compelled us to scour the Internet for interesting resources is also what’s motivating us to jump right back in again. That’s right – as of today, we’re back online.

While we’re still taking baby steps, and both sites are in the process of development, we thought it was best to begin posting the types of materials you've come to expect from us during the past decade as we construct our new sites. We also feel comfortable saying that we have several new features in the works. -- Read More

The LISNews Blogs To Read in 2011

If you're like me (and you know you want to be) you'll find this year's list surprisingly unterrible when compared to the vast majority of librarian blogs. I started the "10 Blogs To Read This Year" way back in 2006 to help highlight the wide range of people writing in the many different areas of librarianship. Each year we've attempted to point out a group of librarians whose writing helps increase our understanding of the profession and its place in our rapidly changing world. Again this year we tried to choose 10 writers who cover very different aspects of our profession, 10 sites that inform, educate and maybe amuse. By following these blogs I think you'll frequently find something new and interesting to read, and a place to gain better understanding of parts of librarianship that are outside of your area. We all have much to learn from each other, and these bloggers are working hard to share their knowledge and experiences with you. The lists from 2006, 2007, 2008,2009 and 2010. See also: How The List Is Made and Why This List Matters. -- Read More

  1. All These Birds With Teeth [Feed]
  2. Forgotten Bookmarks [Feed]
  3. Hack Library School. [Feed]
  4. InkDroid [Feed]
  5. The LSW Friendfeed Room [Feed]
  6. Musings about librarianship [Feed]
  7. Pegasus Librarian [Feed]
  8. SearchReSearch [Feed]
  9. Screwy Decimal [Feed]
  10. The Undergraduate Science Librarian [Feed]

A Stealth Librarian Manifesto (from Confessions of a Science Librarian)

"Stealth librarianship is a way of being...the principles of stealth librarianship apply to all branches of the profession, each in particular ways...the core is the same: to thrive and survive in a challenging environment, we must subtly and not-so-subtly insinuate ourselves into the lives of our patrons. We must concentrate on becoming part of their world, part of their landscape..." *

A timely and very thought-provoking list from John Dupuis via Confessions of a Science Librarian.

*Included with permission from the author.

AOL Buys Huffington Post

In a stunning move, BBC News reports that AOL is buying the Huffington Post. The Media Network blog at Radio Netherlands Worldwide notes that Arianna Huffington will move from being editor of a center-left group blog to heading up AOL's content division including properties like TechCrunch, Engadget, Moviefone, Mapquest, and more. The LA Times reported that this is AOL's largest acquisition since it was divorced from Time Warner. Advertising Age reports that the content properties will be merged into the "Huffington Post Media Group". The Tatler, the group blog of center-right media group Pajamas Media, also weighed in on the acquisition.

Library Christmas Carol

From The Wikiman Blog, a "Library Christmas Carol", a seasonal look at changes in libraryland. The story has the classic characters of Scrooge and Marley, but is updated to include online subscriptions, social media, the Ghosts of Libraries Past and other Library 2.0 stuff.

Name Your Favorite New Librarian Blogs - 10 Blogs To Read in 2011

As we quickly march toward the end of 2010, the pressure is mounting to produce the annual list of blogs to read in the coming year. We'll consider any blogs that might be of interest to librarians. They need not be famous or long lived, in fact we're always looking for NEW sites and new writers doing interesting work.
Our past lists:

10 Blogs To Read in 2006
http://www.lisnews.org/node/17775
10 Blogs To Read In 2007
http://www.lisnews.org/node/20341
10 Blogs To Read In 2008
http://lisnews.org/node/28830
10 Blogs To Read In 2009
http://www.lisnews.org/10_librarian_blogs_read_2009
10 Blogs To Read in 2010
http://www.lisnews.org/10_librarian_blogs_read_2010

If It's Shared Online, It's Shared With the Whole World

There is no privacy online. NOT FOR WORK OR THE SQUEAMISH/or OLD FUDDY-DUDDIES.

A vigilant LISNews reader told me about the Duke grad and her powerpoint sex project.

Karen Owen's PowerPoint list is more famous now than she ever could have imagined. Owen, a Duke graduate of 2010, has become an internet sensation after a mock-thesis titled, "An education beyond the classroom: excelling in the realm of horizontal academics," went viral around the internet and propelled her into the mainstream media spotlight.

Since creating the now widely-seen list -- a project rating her sexual conquests during her time at Duke -- Owen has been thrust to the forefront of discussions about sex on college campuses and amongst American youth, including stories on prominent outlets such as CBSNews.com and on NBC's The Today Show, as well as garnering huge attention in the blogosphere.

And from Jezebel, the 42-page presentation (slides 9, 10 about sex in the library). And now the publishers have come to call.

About Those Publishers e-Book Prices...

First reported a few days ago, the pundits are now adding their 2 cents.

This from Dan Gillmor at Salon: When America's book publishers wrested control of e-book prices from Amazon earlier this year, I expected two results. First, prices would go up. Second, I'd buy fewer new Kindle books. I got that part right.

What I didn't expect, however, was that publishers would be so incredibly foolish as to start raising e-book prices to the point that they were close to, and in a few cases above, the hardcover prices. Here's a non-literary term for this policy: nuts.

I've been keeping loose track of this trend for months, and had noticed that some hardcover books were getting close to the Kindle prices. Then the barrier fell, as the New York Times reported this week, when at least two books actually were more costly to read on Kindle devices than the actual physical book.

How did this happen? It's a classic Traditional Media vs. the Digital Age story. The key players are Amazon, the major book publishers and Apple.

When 103-Year Old Dies, Her Reading Circle Mourns

When Elizabeth Goodyear died late last month, at 103, a handful of friends, all more than two generations younger, sat vigil. They toasted her over dark chocolate, the elixir Ms. Goodyear had savored daily since she was 3 years old, and Champagne, a more recent favorite.

Two years ago, a front-page article in The New York Times featured Ms. Goodyear, a lifelong lover of books, and the small group of people who would stop by her apartment, in Murray Hill, to read to her after she lost her sight. Those readers became a family to Ms. Goodyear, who had outlived her relatives and loved ones.

It all began about seven years ago, after Alison West, a yoga instructor who lives in Ms. Goodyear’s building, posted a sign seeking readers in yoga studios downtown and sent an e-mail that was forwarded again and again.

“Liz has no family at all, and all her old friends have died, but she remains eternally positive and cheerful and loves to have people come by to read to her or talk about life, politics, travel — or anything else,” the message read. “She also loves good chocolate!”

Young women in their 20s, many of them Ms. West’s students, started to visit. Read more in the NYTimes blogs.

Another Kind of Ephemera...Bookplates

The latest posting on Confessions Of A Bookplate Junkie (Lewis Jaffe, who has been a collector for thirty years).

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