Books

What of Old Books?

Here\'s a short but sweet Story from Feedmag on our love / hate relationship with \"Old Books\". They call the LOC plan to digitize all it\'s books a \"fit of visionary enthusiasm\", and raise some interesting questions on the rush to digitize everything.

\"How much difference is there, really, between revering old books simply because they\'re old and ignoring them for the same reason?\"

Freedom from choice

Bob Cox sent in This Story from Salon on all those \"best of\" books. You know the ones, \"Best Short Stories\", \"Best Long Stories\", \"Best Boring Stories\".....


\"Preselection is one of those organizing principles -- like Oedipal conflict or right-wing conspiracy -- that seem, the minute you hear them, to make disparate phenomena fall into an understandable pattern. Oprah\'s Book Club, for instance, has had more influence on American literature than Lionel Trilling and Ralph Waldo Emerson combined. It\'s so popular because Winfrey is saying, \"This is a good book. Go and read it.\" \"

Best Books Of 2000

One of my favorite things at the end of the year is all the lists. This One comes from the The LA Times and is made up of their best books of the year.

The list includes The Best Children\'s Books of 2000 and the The Best Nonfiction of 2000

Don\'t worry, Harry Potter is on there.

Our Great Addiction

It\'s not as sexy as Herion, as much fun as crack or as trendy as X...The Detroit Metro Times calls book buying a \"great addiction\". I think more than a few of us suffer from this addiction, and This Article takes a look at it.
If you or someone you love suffers with this addiction, Don\'t miss the Tips for compulsive book collectors

“When I go into a bookstore, the smell of a bookstore, or a library, really gets to me,” says Joy, a 30-something Wayne State English student. “I get excited about the idea of something new to read.”

Gutenberg goes Webby

The British Library has put the The Gutenberg Bible online digital facsimile. If you\'ve never seen the real thing, check this virtual copy out. They say there are only 48 left and The British Library has two complete copies. They discovered 3 interesting things while producing The digital images.

1.It was first envisaged that rubrics should be printed in red. This was soon abandoned, perhaps to save time.
2.It was decided to increase the number of lines per page, presumably to save paper.
3.It was decided to increase the print-run, but as some sheets had already been printed in the number first envisaged, these pages had to be printed again. This is the best explanation for why a number of the pages exist in two different versions.

Bring out the Reading Mobile

The Baltimore Sun has this story about a bookmobile that promotes reading by find those that don\'t go to the library.\"Harford County Public Library officials have rolled out their latest effort to reach children sometimes left on the sidelines when it comes to library use, launching a $135,000 vehicle dubbed \"Rolling Reader\" and packed with computers, Internet connections and more than 3,000 books.\" -- Read More

The National Book Award winners

Publishers Weekly has the The National Book Award winners.

They include
In America by Susan Sontag
and In the Heart of the Sea by Nathaniel Philbrick.

Antiquarian bookstores try to survive

Bob Cox sent in this Story
from SF Gate
on antiquarian bookstores in San Francisco. They
interview store owners on the effects of the internet, and
the crazy real estate market in SF and how things in the
old book market are going.

\"It\'s not the quantity
of books sold, it\'s the quality. We\'re not about turnover.
\"

The internet is driving them out of business
indirectly, due to high rent prices.

Plant Sprouts Tomorrow

The fourth part of the serial novel \"The Plant\" will
be posted on King\'s Web
site Monday. Further installments up to part 8 will be
available for $2 each, but the whole thing will still cost
you $13.00. He had said he would stop with the last
installment if people paying for the download dropped
below 75 percent. Anyone out there read it? Is it any
good?

The conglomeration of American publishing

Feedmag has an Interview with André Schiffrin, Dave Eggers, and John Donatich on the state of publishing, and the impact emerging technologies might have upon it. They talk about how Amazon.com, ebooks, and print-on-demand will change the role of the editor, and if large corporations will change fundamentally the way we read and what books are available to us.

\"More people are literate, college educated, and book buying than ever before. We have a greater number of publishers in business, and stats released just last week revealed that independent presses produce seventy percent of the books in a U.S. market that generates more than forty billion dollars in sales annually. \"

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