Books

Canadian Heritage Committee Issues Report on Book

Cabot writes \"The Heritage Committee of the Canadian House of Commons has issued its report on the book industry. Of note is the chapter on libraries, preservation and access. Among the recommendations are:

- the Department of Canadian Heritage develop and fund a set of comprehensive tools for measuring the activities of libraries in the form of valid and up-to-date statistics relating to library funding, library spending and library usage by Canadians, including print-disabled Canadians.

- Government of Canada, in conjunction with the provinces and in discussion with the
library community, Canada\'s publishers, wholesalers and booksellers, offer incentives for Canadian libraries to purchase more of their books from Canadian suppliers.

- Government of Canada provide additional funding to the National Library of Canada, beginning in the fiscal year 2000-2001, so that its AMICUS services (the union catalogue) may be provided at no cost to its users.

The Report can be found on-line at:
parl.gc.ca \"

Books Unbound, Life Unraveled

John Updike has written a fantastic op-ed piece for the New York Times about the sanctity of books what he would miss if they cease to exist.\"...already much of the written communication that used to be handled by letters, newspapers and magazines has shifted to computer screens and to the vast digital library available over the Internet. If the worst comes true, and the paper book joins the papyrus scroll and parchment codex in extinction, we will miss, I predict, a number of things about it.\" -- Read More

Anal Retentive? Or Just a Love of Books

When I first started serious reading, I would always wash my hands before I would pick up my current book. I would also flex out the pages so as not to create a crease in the spine, and dog-eared pages....don\'t get me started. After reading this article from the Chicago Tribune, I felt at ease in knowing that I was not the only one.
\"I am the sort who reads a paperback at about 120 degrees open, rather than a flat-out 180. I wash my hands before I pick up any book other than a mass market paperback that I am merely toying with. And, as I am sure my grade-school librarians, Mrs. DeMers and Mrs. Hjelmseth, would be delighted to learn, I have never forgotten to carefully break in a new book.\" -- Read More

world\'s tiniest book

Mass Live has a cool littel Story on the world\'d tiniest book. Finally a book that a librarian can use to keep track of the tiny salary he/she makes!


It measures 1/2-inch by 5/16-inch, and is most likely the smallest hand-bound book in the world. Don\'t keep it in Ready Reference. -- Read More

Holy MP3

You can now download an MP3 version of The Bible online. You can get it at Audiotreasure.com.

Wired has an Interview with the guy who did it.

Limits on books in prison upheld

The Milwaukee Journal Sentinal published this article about the amount of books that inmates in segregation are allowed to have with them at one time. The inmates said that the rule (which said that they can only have three) violated their first amendment rights. They won the case, but the appeals court disagreed, and it was over-ruled.
\"The center\'s inmates, who are segregated for violating prison disciplinary rules, can only have three state-issued paperback books in addition to their own religious book, such as a Bible or Qur\'an.\" -- Read More

Barney has Been a Bad Dinosaur

Librarians and Parents beware. As this article from the New York Post states, Barney the Dinosaur books have been found in New York which contain hidden pornography.
\"The discoveries in Putnam County and on Staten Island are similar to that of a Long Island tot who found a picture of a topless woman and steamy massage instructions in French underneath an electronic music box glued to the book.\" -- Read More

Books on Tape - Mind Candy or Enrichment?

The Los Angeles Times has this interesting article on books on tape. Its critics say that they are \"mind-candy\" which does not assist in making better readers.
\"That\'s the feeling of Willy Ackerman, an English teacher at Kennedy High School in Granada Hills. Although she may read a few passages of a book out loud to her students, Ackerman said the best way to master reading is to read. \"Difficult reading helps us to become better readers,\" she said. \"Easy reading helps us to become faster readers. That\'s how you improve.\"
The article also discusses audio books in schools. -- Read More

Small Booksellers Seek Browsers Online

The New York Times carried this article on independant booksellers\' quests to compete in the online world.
\"Nearly half the independent booksellers have disappeared since 1994, according to the American Booksellers Association. Now the Internet, the site of so much recent loss for the independents, will take on greater importance as a battleground in the next two months.\" -- Read More

Spurned by wife, man gives up pulp fiction library

The Times of India has this article about a man who had to choose between his laundry and his 25,000 Pulp Fiction book collection.
\"My wife gave me an ultimatum,\" he recalls. \"She said, \'I can\'t get to the washer and dryer. You have to make a decision between the books and clean clothes.\" The books are now at the University at Buffalo\'s Lockwood Library. Five years after Kelley donated them to his alma mater, librarians have catalogued each volume.\" -- Read More

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