Books

Bring out the Reading Mobile

The Baltimore Sun has this story about a bookmobile that promotes reading by find those that don\'t go to the library.\"Harford County Public Library officials have rolled out their latest effort to reach children sometimes left on the sidelines when it comes to library use, launching a $135,000 vehicle dubbed \"Rolling Reader\" and packed with computers, Internet connections and more than 3,000 books.\" -- Read More

The National Book Award winners

Publishers Weekly has the The National Book Award winners.

They include
In America by Susan Sontag
and In the Heart of the Sea by Nathaniel Philbrick.

Antiquarian bookstores try to survive

Bob Cox sent in this Story
from SF Gate
on antiquarian bookstores in San Francisco. They
interview store owners on the effects of the internet, and
the crazy real estate market in SF and how things in the
old book market are going.

\"It\'s not the quantity
of books sold, it\'s the quality. We\'re not about turnover.
\"

The internet is driving them out of business
indirectly, due to high rent prices.

Plant Sprouts Tomorrow

The fourth part of the serial novel \"The Plant\" will
be posted on King\'s Web
site Monday. Further installments up to part 8 will be
available for $2 each, but the whole thing will still cost
you $13.00. He had said he would stop with the last
installment if people paying for the download dropped
below 75 percent. Anyone out there read it? Is it any
good?

The conglomeration of American publishing

Feedmag has an Interview with André Schiffrin, Dave Eggers, and John Donatich on the state of publishing, and the impact emerging technologies might have upon it. They talk about how Amazon.com, ebooks, and print-on-demand will change the role of the editor, and if large corporations will change fundamentally the way we read and what books are available to us.

\"More people are literate, college educated, and book buying than ever before. We have a greater number of publishers in business, and stats released just last week revealed that independent presses produce seventy percent of the books in a U.S. market that generates more than forty billion dollars in sales annually. \"

Book Can Survive in Electronic Age

The world\'s largest book fair is going on in Frankfurt, Germany, and in an Interview in Upside German Publishers and Booksellers Association President Roland Ulmer said the printed word will be just fine.

\"Gutenberg\'s printed paper book will continue to hold its own, .... \"But when it comes to fiction, buyers and readers are more inclined to hold back and over the coming years, we will continue to read our novels and short stories in printed versions,\"

Of course being president of a booksellers assoc. might just give him a slanted view on this.

Literary Magazines Take on the Book Publishing Industry

The Village Voice has an interesting Story on several literary magazines that have optimistically expanded into a new arena: book publishing. The alternative presses continue to grow.

\"The literary magazine presses seem like nothing so much as a return to Epstein\'s cottage industry; in both their structure and their sense of responsibility to the writer, there is something profoundly nostalgic about these publishing projects, while their attempts to draw around them a creative community seem haunted by memories of other, now extinct New York bohemias.\"

Do Open-Source Books Work?

Ben Crowell has written an excellent article on Open Source Books.

How will the internet change book publishing? This article examines a new crop of math and science textbooks that are available for free over the internet, and discusses what they have to tell us about whether the open-source software model can be translated into book publishing. -- Read More

Mom buys books for prision

Here is an interesting article from the New Press. A mother of a prisioned man has bought 50 books for a section of the jail that is without them.\"Rocky Graziano, a spokesman for the Lee County Sheriff’s Office, said mentally ill inmates are kept out of the jail’s general population for safety reasons.

Unfortunately, isolation meant to protect them also keeps those inmates out of the jail’s library, said Bette Scruggs, an education program coordinator at the jail.\" -- Read More

Book Ratings?!

Here is an interesting article from SF Gate. School trustees may want to put ratings on required reading, which will inform parents about their contents.\" Several trustees say they want to do a better job of alerting parents to content that they might find inappropriate for their children. They are also reviewing how the Fairfield- Suisun school district selects required reading and responds to community challenges to books on the list.\" -- Read More

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