Books

Leisure reading on the decline, say surveys

The Straits Times of Singapore reports that various sources show books may be losing out to videos. One factoid about the US says that \"in 1998, the number of videos rented each day was double the number of library books checked out.\" Well, sure -- it takes more than 90 minutes to read a book.

\"Research into reading habits in Japan shows children are reading fewer books each year. In the US, people are twice as likely to [rent] a video than borrow a book from the library.\"

Dead authors write to Amazon

Bob Cox suggested this.The Register has a spooky Story on long dead authors leaving comments on their books.

\"Einstein has revealed that he got it wrong about quantum mechanics and God does play with dice. And Fyodor Dostoyevskywrites that he still likes his work even though he\'s dead.\"

They call them \"an amusing fake author posting\", I think they are real! The dead speak to us through the web. -- Read More

Dictionary Publishers Going Digital

The NY Times has a Story on plans from Houghton Mifflin, Merriam-Webster and Microsoft, and Oxford University Press (The OED Folks) to sell electronic versions of their dictionaries, in one form or another.

\"Stifled for years by low margins and flat sales, publishers are salivating over digital licensing as a new source of revenue growth and promoting new features like audible pronunciations. But word scholars worry that the new pressures of the online market may end up favoring well-connected or well-positioned dictionaries -- some sniffingly cite Microsoft\'s Encarta -- over more authoritative lexicons. \" -- Read More

Bibliotherapy in England

Studio B Buzz suggested this One from CNN on \"Bibliotherapy\". It hasn\'t caught on in The States yet, but I bet people in California have something like this, don\'t they?


\"So where can you -- the average depressed, stressed-out, anxiety-ridden American -- find a good bibliotherapist in this country? Sorry, but you probably won\'t find one at all. Officials at the American Library Association (ALA) say that librarians in the United States aren\'t accustomed to handing out prescriptions for literary medicine. \" -- Read More

New words (and a few odd ones too) in the new dictionary

This article from the Columbus Dispatch describes a few new words and phrases that will appear in a revision of the Random House Webster\'s College Dictionary. Included are \"Arm Candy\", \"Eye Candy\", \"Senior Moment\", and \"DWB\" (Driving While Black)\"DWB (driving while black) was added as a reference to racial profiling. The term is used sarcastically to describe the reason why police have stopped black motorists. Merriam-Webster added big time (something done on a large scale) this year. ATV (all-terrain vehicle) and smoothie (a creamy drink) also were added.\" -- Read More

The wonderfuld world of pop-ups

Bob Cox has sent in many a link over these past few
months, but this has got to be the coolest. North TX U
Library
has an online display of Pop-Up and
Moveable books.
Check out the website
, the images move, just like
the
books. They go back as far as 1811, many fine
examples.

Science Group Bemoans Book Quality

Reginald A writes :

I just read the ED Week July 12 Article \"Science Group Bemoans Quality of
Biology Textbooks\"
and was thinking that
the findings of the AAAS Project 2061 were spot on: that textbooks and the
general math and science curricula were \"a mile wide and an inch deep.\"


Clearly this is an area where a library could work in partnership with a
school system. Of course, policy drives this sort of thing...that\'s why the
curricula and the textbooks are in the shape they are. Still, those school
systems - or individual teachers - who are willing and able to draw on the
expertise of the library, could add some sorely-needed depth to a math and
science program. -- Read More

Technology Shrinks Library

School libraries are in a quandry these days as budgets have not been increased, yet they are expected to buy books and computers. The solution is not an easy one. Check out this article by the Shreeveport Times.\"The push by school administrators to buy technology is leaving many of the nation’s school libraries with thin and outdated book inventories.\" -- Read More

Reading habit has declined in Sri Lanka

This Story tells us reading is declining in Sri Lanka due to lack of interest in reading and leisure. Is this happening in other countries?

\"The survey was conducted under the direction of Cultural and Religious Affairs Ministry. The report on the survey says that 63.7 per cent admitted that their reading habit has dropped. Most Sri Lankans are monolingual. Their principal language of communication is Sinhala, only 16.1 percent of them could read English and 0.9 percent Tamil. Of those who consider Tamil as their principle language of communication 35.4 percent could read Sinhala and 4.8 percent English. -- Read More

The Throwaway Libraries

Asia Week has this nice story on schools in the Philippines that get second and third hand books sent to them from America. The students love it, and so do I. Way to go!!\"In DDU schools, all the students have to read are worn-out books and mimeographed materials, with hardly any pictures or color. The library is a single, dilapidated shelf in a poorly lit room, and the several dozen books in it are under lock and key.\" -- Read More

Syndicate content