Books

Great time to be a librarian

Thomas J. Hennen Jr. writes:It may be a still be a great time to be a publisher or a librarian, despite all the problems, it seems.

Jason Epstein has a fascinating article that parallels the recent \'Great Time to Be a Librarian\' thread on PubLib (see digests 1233 to 1236 at http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/PubLib/

Epstein\'s article is on the future of the book publishing business and it is titled \'The Rattle of Pebbles.\'It can be found in the New York Review of Books; Volume XLVII, Number 7; Cover Date: April 27, 2000. It is on also the web at:
http://www.nybooks.com/nyrev/index.html
Says Epstein: \"Twenty years ago when my children and their friends came of age I advised them to shun the publishing business. Today I would offer young people, the opposite advice. The transformation that awaits them foreshadows cultural ramifications that can hardly be imagined but that promise a lifetime of creative adventure...\" -- Read More

Book clubs coming back

A Story from the Binghamton Press has good things to say about book clubs.

\"This week is Turn Off TV Week. Reading is something where everyone can use their life experiences and enjoy an alternative to television,\" said Melanie Battoe, library director at the Guernsey Memorial Library in Norwich. Battoe started a book review group at the library Friday with a noon brown-bag discussion of Memoirs of a Geisha . This fall, she plans a monthly mystery book group. -- Read More

Books on Demand

Yahoo News picked up This Story on Bookstores where customers pick out titles and have them printed in minutes. It would be like having an unlimited number of books in stock. Combine this with an E-Book reader and your library could put together an impressive collection in no time! -- Read More

Annual Who Reads What? Celebrity Reading List

The Gardiner Public Library has published their \"Who Reads What?\" survey of celebrity book picks.Gary J. Remal, Faith Hill, Christina Ricci, Nolan Ryan and others are on the list. -- Read More

Internet kills off oldest bookshop

The Times
UK
is reporting in a Very Short Story
that the worlds oldest bookstore, JOHN Smith & Son in
Glasgow\'s West End is closing thanks to competition
from online giants such as Amazon and BN.com.

The firm was founded in 1751 by John Smith, the
youngest son of the Laird of Craigend, who opened a
shop on Trongate selling books, snuff and coffee to
Glasgow\'s tobacco merchants. -- Read More

First e-ditions of e-books

Thomas J. Hennen Jr. writes \"Three things have made the news lately that brought parts of the web to a halt:
the hacker attacks on Yahoo,
Brittanica\'s launch as a free online encyclopedia,
and Stephen King\'s e-book \"Riding the Dollar - oops I mean- Bullet.\"

Isn\'t it nice, in a way, that two of the three were book related?

But I have a serious concern! :-)

What will happen to collectors? How does one get a first edition of an e-book? King may have missed an historic chance here! Why didn\'t he and the publishers issue a first edition for e-book collectors? -- Read More

OED is online

If you have $800us (US$550 at home) to burn you can now subscribe to the Oxford English Dictionary Online.

They do have The Word of the Day for free. Today is RELIC. They promise to add an incredible number of new words to the online version.

Foyle\'s huge private book collection up for auction

Don\'t you wish you had the money to acquire this extraordinary collection? Read about it here. From Yahoo UK.

One of the largest British book collections in private hands, comprising more than 4,000 volumes and with works by Shakespeare, Chaucer and Dickens, is to go to auction from July 11-13, Christie\'s has said.

The private library of William Foyle, the founder of London\'s famous Foyles bookstore who died in 1963, is expected to realise more than six million pounds, the auctioneers said.

Free expression vs. religious sensitivity

Foxnews has this story from ATHENS, Greece

It began with a small fire. About 200 religious zealots and ultra-conservatives fed the flames in January with copies of a book they call blasphemous because of passages about the possible sexual longings of Jesus Christ.

The book burning, however, was just kindling for a bigger confrontation. Political leaders, clergymen and scholars have been drawn onto the unstable ground between the nation\'s commitment to free expression and the Orthodox Christian heritage that figures strongly in Greece\'s ethnic identity. -- Read More

The last of the great salt-trading people

The NYTimes has a nice\"Story on a woman in Africa who still deals books the old fashioned way.

Oddly enough, there can still be romance in being a bookseller, an embattled yet ennobled calling these days. More accurately, let\'s say there can be passion and adventure in trafficking in books: buying, selling and bartering them, rather like dealing for salt along the old trade routes. A woman who owns a bookstore in Cape Town, South Africa, does just that. She bargains in books and jokingly refers to herself as \"the last of the great salt-trading people.\" -- Read More

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