Ebooks

Bi-Literate Reading

Paper or screen? There's a battle in your brain. The more you read on screens, the more your brain adapts to the "non-linear" kind of reading we do on computers and phones. Your eyes dart around, you stop half way through a paragraph to check a link or a read a text message. Then, when you go back to good old fashioned paper, it can be

harder to concentrate. "The human brain is almost adapting too well to the particular attributes or characteristics of internet reading," says Maryanne Wolf of Tufts University. She says we have to develop a 'bi-literate' brain if we want to be able to switch from the scattered skimming typical of screen reading to the deeper, slow reading that we associate with books on paper. It is possible. It just takes work. One person who has done it well is Maria Popova, founder of Brainpickings.org. In this episode, Manoush visits her home, marvels at the piles of books everywhere, and learns how Maria manages to read about a dozen books a week and still retain the information, organize ideas around a myriad of themes, and churn out multiple smart, insightful, original posts every day. She does it using a mix of digital and analog tools and techniques to help her read better. Story from NPR's New Tech City and their delightfully peppy host, Manoush Zomorodi.

Aiming to Be the Netflix of Books

Monthly subscription services from Amazon, Oyster and Scribd offer access to unlimited e-books, but many newer books aren’t yet available.

NYT article

Librarians, Media React to Launch of Kindle Unlimited

Excerpt: “I’m enough of a realist to assume that consumers will gravitate to the cheapest, most convenient source of content, whether that’s Amazon or the public library,” said Jimmy Thomas, executive director of Colorado’s Marmot Library Network. “Amazon continues to set a high standard of convenience libraries should attend to. And every time this huge corporation does something on a massive scale, libraries should be reminded to approach services differently. Competing with Amazon on its own terms is not a good direction for libraries. But thinking about how to complement Amazon is worthwhile.”Full piece

Subscriptions are in the news this week

Subscriptions for ebooks are certainly in the news this week. Amazon just announced their Kindle Unlimited offering, taking its place beside Oyster and Scribd as a “one price for all you can eat” Netflix- or Spotify-for-ebooks program. And the Book Industry Study Group has released a lengthy and fact-filled report from Ted Hill and Kate Lara covering subscriptions across publishing segments.

It is hard to quarrel with the report’s contention that “subscriptions are here to stay”. The report makes clear, and documents extensively, that there are a great variety of ways subscriptions can be offered and that tools making it easier to manage them are becoming cheaper, better, and more ubiquitous. The report suggests that subscriptions could occur for as narrow an offering as one author’s works. As technology enables subscription offers to be economically viable with less and less revenue, the tendency for more and more publishers to want to “own” their customers, combined with the tendency for publishers to build up their intellectual property inventory in an audience-centric (vertical) way, either organically or by acquisition, it is easy to see how they could proliferate.

Full piece

With eBooks Still Pricey, Illinois Libraries Flex Their Marketing Muscle

It’s a rare thing in a free market when a customer is refused the ability to buy a company’s product and is told its money is no good here.

- Maureen Sullivan, 9/28/2012 – An Open Letter to America’s Publishers

When Sullivan penned this letter as President of the American Library Association, she was worried about the future of libraries. The ALA sought public support over a dispute between libraries and Big 5 publishers in much the same way that Hachette Book Group is currently enlisting authors in its fight over book pricing with Amazon. The problem was simple. Library patrons were reading more and more eBooks.

Full story here.

thoughts on region restrictions in ebook DRM

http://www.antipope.org/charlie/blog-static/2014/07/some-rambling-thoughts-on-regi.html

In principle, I oppose region restrictions. As a reader, they make me itch. But in practice, the way book distribution works across international borders is worse than imperfect: it's broken. If I sell world English language rights to one of my books to a publisher, that publisher can't just print and distribute the book everywhere in the English-speaking world. Publishers used to be regional, not global, players. And even in the wake of the wave of takeovers that resulted in the Big Six Five owning about 70% of the business, mergers between publishing houses are incredibly slow and complicated due to contractual encumbrances.

E-Readers Are Dying. What Does That Mean for Book Sales?

The E-Reader Death Watch Begins

Tech writers have begun rolling out their eulogies for the humble e-reader, which Mashable has deemed “the next iPod.” As in, it’s the next revolutionary, single-purpose device that's on the verge of being replaced by smartphones and tablet computers. Barnes & Noble is spinning off its Nook division. Amazon just debuted its own smartphone, which some are taking as a tacit admission that more people are reading books on their phone these days, to the detriment of the Kindle. The analysts at Forrester, meanwhile, expect that U.S. e-reader sales will tumble to 7 million per year by 2017, down from 25 million in 2012.

http://www.slate.com/blogs/moneybox/2014/06/27/death_of_e_readers_what_does_that_mean_for_bo...

Amazon exec on Hachette dispute: “It’s all about ebook pricing”

An Amazon executive finally spoke out on the ongoing Hachette contract negotiations, saying that they are in the customer’s long-term interest.

Full piece at gigaoam

How Amazon is holding Hachette hostage

Corey Doctorow argues that the overuse of DRM is harming Hachette in their negotiations/fight with Amazon. Full piece here.

Why It’s Difficult For Your Library to Lend Ebooks

Story at Boston.com about program to increase ebook lending in the state and discussion about the problems relating to ebook lending and libraries.

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