Young Adults

Viet Nam’s publishers neglect teen readers

A Column From Viet Nam News says Vietnamese writers and publishers fo-cused on books for young children have forgotten readers aged between 13 and 19, according to industry insiders.

"While some 800,000 kids’ comic books roll off domestic presses every week, our publishing house puts out no more than 100 literary titles for teens each year," said poet Cao Xuan Son, head of the HCM City branch of Kim Dong, a leading children’s publisher.

The Power of Knowledge

The Cortez Journal - Cortez,CO has This Report on The Power Library Project, a program sponsored by the Colorado State Library in Denver, according to Bonnie McClure, the library community programs consultant for the Colorado State Library.

“The Power Library Project is an initiative to encourage quality school library programs,†McClure said.

The project, which has recognized school achievements for eight years, rose out of several studies conducted in Colorado and Pennsylvania, McClure said.

Libraries using Web to snare teens

The Boston Globe Reports teenagers can be a hard group to connect with, the Southeastern Massachusetts Regional Library System's staff has found, so they decided to try where they are most likely to be found. And, as any parent of a teenager knows, that place is online.
After two years of effort, the website myowncafe.org is up and running and attracting interest from teenagers and librarians across the 86-library network.

Maryland Superintendent To Reconsider Ban Of Young Adult Novel

More News on The Carroll County, Maryland, superintendent, who initially deemed a popular, critically acclaimed novel for young adults inappropriate for school libraries because of language and sexual content, will read the entire book before making a final decision, a school official said Wednesday.Students have organized a petition drive to save the book, which has won several awards, including being named the 2004 Michael L. Printz Honor Book by the Yougn Adult Library Services Association.

"Part of this process has really been educational for kids," Johnson said. "Our students really get to understand and really get to talk about issues like censorship, like First Amendment rights, like ways to voice their concerns when they don't agree with something."

Norwegian children's books to cross Atlantic

Norwegian children's literature celebrates its 200th anniversary this year. An exhibit opening at the Capital Children's Museum (CCM) in Washington, D.C., will give children and adults a chance to walk through those eras and get to know the stories and characters created by authors and illustrators from this little northern country of 4.5 million people. News of Norway has more.

Teen Slams SUV Into School Library

Not Many Details on this one, but a Ford Explorer driven by the boy slammed into Rivera Middle School, in California, at 7200 Citronell Avenue around 11:30 last night, said Sgt. Richard Shear of the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department's Pico Rivera Station.
The boy then fled, only to return a few minutes later, when he was arrested, Shear said.

The vehicle broke through a wall of the school's library, causing "a couple thousand dollars of damage," Shear said.

New policy to make library safer for kids

Some interesting happenings down at the Midland County TX public library. The Commissioners' Court approved Johnson's request to enact a policy that would allow library staff to prohibit adults not accompanied by children from loitering in the children's section of the library. Johnson said there would be exceptions for adults picking up books for their children or researching children's literature.

"All I'm asking is if there is an adult acting differently, we can ask them to sit elsewhere," Johnson said.

Logic books puzzlingly popular among kids

Wayne Gould is the 60-year-old former judge credited with popularizing Sudoku puzzles in the Western world. He shared the addictive game with students at Little Harbour School Friday and was swarmed by the young fans wanting his autograph. Sea Coast Online explains just what Sudoku is all about. "You either love it or you hate it, and I love it," said fourth-grader Jenny DiPietro.

Graphic novels are drawing in kids, with positive results in more ways than one

An interesting article on graphic novels from the Seattle Post-Intelligencer:

"Not only are comics the hottest thing in teen and adult publishing, they're getting a whole lot of love from librarians, who are scrambling to flesh out their graphic-novel collections and understand the market."

"So it was inevitable that the comics craze would extend down to the original, but long-forgotten, part of the fan base: kids."

Award for the library that lent support to a plague of drunken youngsters

I believe this is the first story I've posted that contained information on "plagues of drunken youngsters." Sighthill Library (in Scotland) has one of four top prizes in the Scottish Executive's Standing Up To Antisocial Behaviour scheme.
Two years ago, the library was plagued by a host of problems, including gang fights, under-age drinking and vandalism, both inside and outside the building.

The library staff were nominated for the award by the police after lifting a ban on youngsters involved in the trouble and instead urging them to use the library's computers and other facilities.

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