Technology

Plea for help from Horowhenua Library Trust

Plea for help from Horowhenua Library Trust
Horowhenua Library Trust is the birth place of Koha and the longest serving member of the Koha community. Back in 1999 when we were working on Koha, the idea that 12 years later we would be having to write an email like this never crossed our minds. It is with tremendous sadness that we must write this plea for help to you, the other members of the Koha community.

The situation we find ourselves in, is that after over a year of battling against it, PTFS/Liblime have managed to have their application for a Trademark on Koha in New Zealand accepted. We now have 3 months to object, but to do so involves lawyers and money. We are a small semi rural Library in New Zealand and have no cash spare in our operational budget to afford this, but we do feel it is something we must fight.

[Thanks to Brett for the link!]

Where Things Stand With SOPA

Matt Cutts has a great summary of what's happening with SOPA: Progress against SOPA:

He has a list of things you can do:

- Sign up at American Censorship to send a note to Congress and get updates.
- Call your congressperson with Tumblr’s easy web page.
- I believe anyone inside or outside the United States can sign this White House petition. If you’re outside the United States, you can also sign this petition.
- Follow groups like the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) on Twitter.
- Sign up with United Republic, a new organization dedicated to the larger problem of money in politics.
- Sign up to have Senator Ron Wyden read your name on the Senate floor when he filibusters against this legislation.

Google Reader Is Not About Reading News It Is About Curation

Google Reader Is Not About Reading News It Is About Curation
"The core of my concern is that curators need tools to find those stories that may not be as popular as others. Otherwise, all news comes from a few select sites that are read by the masses. Obviously, this is not what we want to have happen. I hope Google finds a way to continue to provide tools for curators, or works with some other tools to allow for easy integration with Google+."

Roger McNamee: Six ways to save the internet

The next big shift is now, and it’s not what you think: Facebook is the new Windows; Google must be sacrificed. At TEDxSantaCruz, tech investor Roger McNamee presents 6 bold ways to prepare for the next internet.

What we learned from 5 million books

Blake posted a link to this video in early October. I missed it then so I wanted to repost for any others that may not have caught it the first time. -- Read More

Cory Doctorow Reports on Planned Fab Lab

Boing Boing reports on the installation of a new 'hackerspace' at the Fayetteville (NY) Free Library. It's being installed in a former furniture factory.

Video tour and story...check it out.

Do Androids Dream of Electric Authors?

Article about a publisher that uses software to create books on thousands of topics. The quality of the books is suspect. Article specifically mentions librarians and how they have to be on the lookout for these books so they do not waste acquisitions money on low quality information.

The Loss of a Valuable Journalistic Tool

For years, health care reporters have employed a government database called the National Practitioner Data Bank, containing information on malpractice payouts. The public version of the database hides the names of physicians, but after a reporter was able to identify an anonymous doctor, the public database was taken offline. Bob talks to Charles Ornstein of the Association of Health Care Journalists about why the database is important, and attempts by journalists to regain access to it.

Transcript here

MP3 file here:
http://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/otm/otm100711c.mp3

RIP Steve Jobs

Unaired Apple ad from 1997

Wikipedia Unveils Probably the Coolest QR Thingy Ever Made

Wikipedia today introduced a program called QRPedia, a QR code creation service that lets users snap a picture of a QR code and be automatically directed to a linked mobile Wikipedia entry in whatever written language their phone uses. If there's no article in their language for the designated topic, the program directs them to the most relevant related article that is available in that language. If you don't have a QR reader on your phone, I use the Google iPhone app, myself.

I dare you to find a cooler example of QR codes in action than QRPedia. Originally built at England's Derby Museum and Gallery (by the museum's Wikipedian in Residence!) the service is now available to anyone online. Multiple museums around the world have already put it to use, posting QR codes on the wall next to items on display. That's what the Internet is for, people, for taking the reality we're standing in front of and exploding it with a world of additional information available on demand.

Full piece at ReadWriteWeb

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