Technology

Public Records Research

LLRX writes \"Lynn Peterson\'s Public Records \"To the Ends of the Earth\" Part 2 is now up.
Risa Sacks continues her interview with public records research expert Lynn Peterson, as reprinted from the book, Super Searchers Go To The Source. Topics covered include asset searching, missing persons, competitive intelligence, and super searcher tips.\"

Hearing Text, Not Tunes, on Your MP3 Player

Ender, The Duke_Of_URL passed along this NYTimes Story that says the winds of change are blowing in the field known as text-to-speech.

New programs do more than simply read text out loud: they can also turn it into MP3 files, which let you listen to your documents — e-mail, Web pages, reports, manuals, electronic books, or anything else you can type or download — as you commute, work out or work outside.

Library helps the blind enjoy graphics

Bob Cox sent over This One on a new device installed earlier this month at the Osaka Prefectural Central Library allows blind PC users to read graphic information via a tactile display that can approximate an image on a Windows screen using 3,072 pop-up plastic pins, each 1.6 mm in diameter. At a cost of 5 million yen (That\'s about $40,000 USD) I\'m not sure we\'ll be seeing them very often.

\"\"By using the (tactile) display, the blind can understand the visual information contained in books and Web sites, which was impossible before,\" said librarian Masayuki Sugita, who is blind.\"

Minneapolis grapples with evolving tech. in planning new library

From the Pioneer Press:

When Minneapolis tears down its 41-year-old library this fall to build a new one, some artifacts that have defined the feel, the smell, the muffled sounds of that public space will go away.

The old card catalog, that wooden, bedrawered box on sturdy legs — gone. And the rickety old conveyor belt, laden with buckets in which books are delivered to patrons? Forget about it.

It will be out with the old. But no one knows for sure what will constitute the new . . .

More. More information about the new Central Public Library can be found here.

Family Privacy Protection Act would Segregate Porn Sites

New legislation has been introduced into the Senate that would place adult Web sites into a special \"red-light district.\" According to Newsbytes, \"the law would instruct the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) to set up a new domain name - such as “dot-prn” - for pornographic Web sites. Owners of adult sites would have 12 months to move their businesses following the creation of the new domain. The bill, dubbed the “Family Privacy Protection Act” also would require e-mail advertisements that include explicit content to be clearly labeled as containing sexually oriented material.\" The bill would not infringe upon free speech, because it would still allow access, but would simply place the material into a specific area. More

More Security Flaws Discovered in IE Browser & MS Office for Mac

A Swedish Engineering student has found yat another major security flaw in the IE browser. According to Andreas Sandblad, the security settings can be bypassed when users hit the back buttons, allowing for malicious code to be automatically embedded into the site\'s URL, and opening the user up to a potential hack attack. More

...And, if you\'re running a MS Office on a MAC, you may have a few more security problems of your own. More

Reading and Writing on Sci-Fi Computer Screens.

Despite an enduring love for paper, most of my reading these days is done
on computer screens.  The sci-fi computer screen of tomorrow teases
my imagination.  Hold it, bend it, maybe even turn it\'s pages? 
Mark it up, then save your highlighting and notes right (write?-) on the
computer screen, and then with a magic shake, like an old etch-a-sketch,
make all your notes disappear so you can read the original document, yet
still have those notes saved somewhere in the ether?

\"Sneak
Peek: The Computer Screen of the Future,
\" from NewsFactor.com
looks at LEP, light-emitting
polymer
[google], that \"because it can be made on flexible plastic
substrates, it not only could be extremely difficult to break, but also
could be molded  into different shapes and contours.\"

ZDNet\'s \"Are
we ready for digital paper,
\" takes a look at a pen
and paper combo that copies what\'s written as a digital picture.

E-Ink [google]
has had a lot of investment and technological advancements the past few
years from various corporations and is promising to be a viable paper-like
[google] reading experience.

LISNews:->Keywords
bookdigital
books
E-Ink.
>Archives:  \"New
Video Screen Is Like Paper.
\"  \"SCREEN
OR PAGE?
\"

-Hermit ;-) -- Read More

Free Software for Your Office

LLRX writes \"
Sheryl Cramer suggests dozens of software applications that will enable you and your office to be productive and efficient without breaking the bank. She covers firewall/virus protestion, utilities for e-mail, chat, faxing, graphics, MAC utilities, entertainment and lots more. In the April 1, 2002 issue of LLRX.com at Technology For Tightwads, Part II \"

Public libraries to test digital service

CNET Has A Story on a new service called \"ebrarian\", that lets people read articles and books online for free but charges them to copy text or print pages.
EBrary will announce The Bibliographical Center for Research, which serves the western United States; Palinet, which serves the mid-Atlantic region; New England-based Nelinet; the Michigan Library Consortium; Wisconsin Library Services; and Ohio\'s Ohionet. Ebrary said the networks will distribute its online research service to 6,000 libraries in the United States, beginning with a 30-day trial in April.

\"There\'s a vulnerability for all of these (online research) companies to be financially successful,\" said Marti Harris, research director for Gartner. \"These digital content providers and relationships are very important and essential for research as part of the whole library collection, (but) they\'re not going to be replacing the traditional libraries...We\'re a long way off from having a totally online library.\"

Bleak future looms if you don\'t take a stand

Bleak future looms if you don\'t take a stand.

1. Do you care if a few giant companies control virtually all entertainment and information?

2. Do you care if they decide what kinds of technological innovations will reach the marketplace?

3. Would you be concerned if they used their power to compile detailed dossiers on everything you read, listen to, view and buy?

4. Would you find it acceptable if they could decide whether what you write and say could be seen and heard by others?\"

You think filters are bad?
It\'s Only getting Worse.

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