Technology

Computers Have Had Little Impact in College Classrooms

The Chronicle of Higher Ed. has A Story on the large investment that American education has made in computers and technology -- and the reasons that those innovations have been underutilized in the classroom.

Oversold and Underused is the book by Larry Cuban they discuss.

See Also: small story on Clifford Stoll and a speech he gave up in Buffalo.

Cyber-sleuths demand new powers

James Nimmo passed along This Story from over at Findlaw on the seizure of a suspect\'s personal computer for the purpose of dissecting the hard drive for possible clues or motives.

FBI agents did just that in the days after the September 11 plane hijack attacks on America, when they confiscated two computers from a Delray Beach, Florida public library that were allegedly used by suspects.

Technology : advancement in libraries

linda writes \"Today technology is moving very fast in trying to make it easier for library users to aquire information.This therefore means librarians in libraries should make sure that they catch up with it as it runs.I\'ve attended a conference where a presentation was conducted about WIRELESS INNOPAC this is a device which looks like a cell phone and one can access a library anywhere in the world by operating the device eg. If one likes to check a book,using title ,author etc

This is possible with this device, this means you communiucate with the library even when in bed. Iam having a fear that at the end of the day as the time goes few librarians will be needed to run the library because most of the task will be done by such devices.\"

Very interesting stuff, though I can\'t find anything on \"Wireless Innopac\" on Google or innopacusers.org, wireless in libraries turned up some good results, including LibWireless:Wireless and Libraries group.

So what do you think, is wireless more of a threat to librarians than the Web?

Project Aims to Make Cuneiform Collections Available

jen writes \"Assyriology going hi-tech -
The Cuneiform Digital Library Initiative, a joint venture of
the University of California at Los Angeles and the Max Planck
Institute for the History of Science, in Berlin, will provide scholars
with access to an enormous database of cuneiform inscriptions.
With more than 200,000 tablets scattered throughout museums in
several countries (not counting the steady flow of black-market
items trickling out of Iraq and onto eBay), the world\'s 400
professional Assyriologists have been struggling to keep from being
buried alive by primary documents. The online library promises to
be the single-largest, most organized, and best cataloged repository
of cuneiform inscriptions in the world, according to its director,
Robert K. Englund, a professor of Near Eastern languages and
culture at UCLA.
Full Story from The Chronicle of Higher Ed\"

SSSCA Down for the Count?

The Electronic Frontier Foundation reports:

Senate Commerce Committee hearings relating to the Security Systems Standards and Certification Act (SSSCA), originally set for October 25, have been postponed in the face of mounting opposition from the technology community.

The SSSCA would require that all future digital technologies include federally-mandated \"digital rights management\" (DRM) technologies that will enable Hollywood to restrict how consumers can use digital content. Response to the draft bill, which was authored by Senator Fritz Hollings (D-SC), has been largely negative. EFF announced its opposition to the bill several weeks ago and encouraged its members to express their concerns to Senator Hollings. IBM, Intel, Microsoft, and others have since announced their opposition, as well.

Senator Hollings has not re-scheduled the hearings, and has indicated that he would consider modifying the bill.

Music Labels Target CD Ripping

jen writes \"N\'Sync\'s new CD can\'t be played or copied onto PCs.
While I\'m not necessarily crying about not being able to listen to N\'Sync at work [I am! says Blake], if I can make mix tapes, why not mix CDs?
\"Labels are reluctant to talk about their copy protection plans for fear consumers will be annoyed with any new restrictions. However, they\'re
already experimenting with copy-protection technology. \"

Full PCworld.com Story \"

A New Approach to Filtering

From Phil Agre of Red Rock Eater Digest fame:

Community Web filtering seems like a good idea, and it\'s time to explore automated tools to support it. In this article I will suggest a design for a Web-based filtering tool. I cannot participate in building such a tool, but I would be happy to try out any prototypes
that others might construct. I have established a discussion list for people who might be interested in working on a tool . . .

Here, then, is my proposed design. I am sure that people who design Web-based services for a living can do better, but I also hope that any designers will listen to my rationales, which are based on years of experience running a community Web filtering service by hand.

The \"webfilter\", as I\'ll call it, is a cross between a discussion list, a weblog, and a bookmark file. It is not just a weblog, since it includes numerous functionalities to deal with long lists of URL\'s. Nor is it just a discussion list, since the goal is to produce a
reasonably clean and orderly presentation of the URL\'s. Nor is it just a bookmark file, because of its community nature . . .

More with thanks to wood s lot

On Digital Library Standards: From Yours and Mine to Ours

From the new issue of CLIR Issues:

If you ask people in research libraries to identify the most significant digital library challenge facing them, it is likely that most will respond with the same answer: the absence of standards. These people are not referring to the formal standards emerging from the International Standards Organization (ISO) or the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C). Such standards are plentiful. Instead, they are bemoaning the lack of a consensus about when and how to apply those formal standards in a digital library.

More with thanks to the Scholarly Electronic Publishing Weblog.

National Library of Scotland to close science reading room

Charles Davis writes \"The National Library of Scotland today announced plans to develop an
electronically-based general information service for scientific and business
researchers. As a consequence, the Library will close its specialist science
reading room and reduce its binding operations.
The full text of this press release is available
Here \"

Amazon Dumps Windows, Saves Millions with Linux

In a move that could potentially spell disaster for the folks at Microsoft, online retail giant, Amazon.com has dumped the Windows operating system for Linux. In all of its open sourceness, could Linux possibly become the new kinder, gentler wizard of OS? more...

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