Technology

CD Eating Fungus

Here\'s A Short story on a fungus that eats compact discs.

Nicholson Baker may have a bigger point than many had thought. They discovered a fungus in Belize that was steadily eating through the supposedly indestructible disc. The fungus had burrowed into the CD from the outer edge, then devoured the thin aluminium layer and some of the data-storing polycarbonate resin.

Nation\'s First 24-Hour Virtual Help Desk

The first of its kind in the nation, this 24-hour virtual help desk, located at the Cleveland Ohio Public Library, hopes to attract new clients. [more...] from The Columbus Dispatch. To visit the virtual help desk, Click Here.

EInk Now In Colour

Slashdot told me about another cool story. This time NewScientist is running a Story on EInk. They say they have succeeded in making electronic paper work in full color. They say Laptops, palmtops and cellphones with rigid electronic paper screens will be on the market within the next two years.

Coming soon, eNewsPapers, eFoldUpBooks, ePaper?

See Also.

The Center for Studying Plagiarism

The Center for Studying PlagiarismThe goal of this web site is to help reduce the impact of plagiarism on education and educational institutions. At present, it distributes free software
to detect plagiarism and is gathering information on peoples’ experiences with plagiarism. The site’s author is Lou Bloomfield, Professor of Physics,
University of Virginia


Part One: Anonymous Survey of Personal Experiences with Plagiarism

Part Two: Software to detect plagiarism

Academic Libraries a Key Target and a Tough Sell

Today\'s Chronicle has a very good Look At the dicey relationship between academic libraries and all the new for-profit cybraries.

Professors are afraid they make it too easy for students to plagiarize and the sparten collections and impending dot-doom that hovers over them leaves academic librarians uneasy about using them.
This is the best look at this topic I\'ve read to date, check it out if this area is of interest.

\"Library users, he says, like being able to look online to see what an e-book offers. But many apparently looked only long enough to decide if it was worth walking to the library to do what students and professors have traditionally done -- check out a good, old-fashioned book\"

Emerging Technologies That Will Change Public Libraries

John Guscott says his report you may have seen here
before was updated on May
1 and has doubled in length.
Read the full report for an interesting look
into the future. They\'ve selected crucial technologies
that public library administrators, trustees, managers
and professionals should be watching.
Teleservice
Next Generation Online Publishing
Language and Translation Software
And several more.

Some Thoughts on the Digital Divide

As the growth of the online population continues upward, the digital divide is narrowing and reasons for being outside of the e-arena may now be more a result of choosing to remain there. [more...] from The Columbus Dispatch.

What is MyLibrary

MyLibrary is A Model for Implementing a User-centered, Customizable Interface to a Library\'s Collection of Information Resources.


Read All About It in this paper by Eric Lease Morgan.

It integrates principles of librarianship (collection, organziation, dissemination, and evaluation) with globably networked computing resources creating a dynamic, customer-driven front-end to any library\'s set of materials.
Possible Conference coming soon.

Future for Questia a question mark

Chron.com has a sad, yet not suprising Story on the state of Questia. After almost 3 years, more than $110 million in VC, and a 300-person staff, they have yet to hit even 1,000 paying subscribers. That\'s not a mistake, not even One Thousand.

They had hoped to have 50,000 titles by February, but only have about 35,000 and another 5,000 of them not completely cleared of copyright restrictions.

A Look at Changes On Questia

T. G. McFadden Writes:

\"Questia has recently made changes to its search-and-retrieval interface (in response to suggestions from users, according to the marketing side) that represent a pretty fair misunderstanding of how the typical undergraduate will want (or need) to use the database.


Prior to this change, the initial search screen (“Quick Search”) presented the standard author, title-word, and subject options. More advanced variations on these basic themes were available in the “Power Search” mode. Now, however, the initial search screen (still “Quick Search”) combines by default all of these search types into a single search statement. This has the following result, when the search concept is the rationalist philosopher Descartes.
\"

Much More -- Read More

Syndicate content